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C++ Book Recommendations

This is a discussion on C++ Book Recommendations within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; If you're 100% new to programming, you may find Accelerated C++ hard to follow, as I did with some basic ...

  1. #46
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    If you're 100% new to programming, you may find Accelerated C++ hard to follow, as I did with some basic knowledge of the language prior. From the very beginning of the book, you're crammed with new concepts left and right with little room to learn how individual concepts work before they are thrown into a bigger picture. It is a very informative book, no doubt, but I think it works better as a "2nd time through" type of book, where you can learn the basics of C++ again, yet in a cleaner, more proper, and efficient manner than what you might have originally been taught. I'm looking forward to going through the entire book, but right now it's just overwhelming.

    For those just getting their feet wet, much like myself, I'm gonna have to agree with Beene here and suggest SAMS Teach Yourself C++ in 21 Days. Theres tons of examples, and they rarely, if ever, implement multiple foreign concepts into the same example. Also, the author often explains some of the trickier concepts by comparing them to everyday situations that a newbie can understand.

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    Registered User Bassglider's Avatar
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    Accelerated C__

    I have read a beginners book in C so I think I have the foundation concepts in place. As for a first book for C++ would this be a good recommendation? I am fairly quick and intelligent and I read good reviews about this book. Has anyone read this as a first C++ book considering they have had a little experience with programming?




    [QUOTE=Daved;525849]Accelerated C++ by Koenig and Moo: Beginners book that teaches C++ style C++, one of if not the most commonly recommended beginner C++ books. Sli

  3. #48
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    I am using BEGINNING C++ GAME PROGRAMMING It included a CD-ROM with DEV-C++. To me it is great for the absolute beginer(like me), It could probably be more in depth though, it seems too simple. Anyway, good starter book.

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    I discovered Sams Teach yourself C++ in 10 minutes to a wonderful refresher course.

  5. #50
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    A book I am currently using to learn c++ is Ivor Horton's Beginning C++, it's good for beginners.

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    C++ For Dummies

    It sounds like its really lame... and at first it is because it spends about err.. 15 pages on what a variable is and how to declare one (not even going into datatypes)... but after a while it really picks up (infact at the end it goes a mile a minute), and it covers all the basics of every field, if you're a new programmer looking to get started, this is for you. Its also good for anyone who learned a prior language such as QB or VB.

    Special includes:
    .net programming
    a special section on the official microsoft compiler (forget what it is)
    a cd with several out of date (but extremely useful if you get the new versions) programs. Such things include a compiler, debugger, graphics library (I think) and a whole string of other more useless programs. The compiler though is a score, devcpp (or maybe it was devc++.. do a search) it has a whole bunch of built in and really useful functions that come in handy, such as System("pause"), which takes you to a "press any key to continue" type screen, and System("cls"), which clears the screen.

    One drawback (if your a #@$&^ mac user): Most of the programs on the CD are PC only (just like all programs should be.. well except the really bad ones.. oh wait.. that's how it is.. but before I start a mac vs pc debate... the book was good)

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    Beautiful Code edited by Andy Oram & Greg Wilson by O'Reilly Books

    I know I'm a noobie when it comes to programming, but I loved this book. I picked it up at Barnes and Noble a couple weeks ago and it's helped me more than anything else so far. It's a non-language specific book that tries to show the developer how to organize his thoughts to write better code.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Daved View Post
    >> the books of HERBERT SCHILDT
    Schildt's books are notorious for being full of errors and bad practices. I would not recommend them.
    Have you read them? I haven't, but I've heard the same and yet I've never heard it from anyone who's read one of his books.

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    Wow, four pages of book recommendations and not one mention of "The C++ FAQs", by Cline, Lomow, and Girou. Much more material than the online version.

    Also, while not strictly C++, "Refactoring" by Fowler is a must read for any OO programmer, IMO.

    Finally, "Large Scale C++ Software Design", by Lakos.
    Last edited by medievalelks; 04-18-2008 at 02:05 PM.

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    >> I've heard the same and yet I've never heard it from anyone who's read one of his books.

    I have not read a C++ Schildt book, but I have thumbed through several of them and I have seen some of the errors and bad practices that he is notorious for.

    The reason that most people who read his books like them are because they are new to C++ and don't know what are errors and what are bad practices. His writing style and teaching style are good, but that's not why I recommend against his books.

    The only people I know of who have read his books that are not beginners are people who review those books for accu and possibly some who comment on them on comp.c++.lang.moderated.

  11. #56
    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    I have C/C++ Programmer's Reference from him. Osborne, ISBN 0-07-882367-6.

    I bought this book right after I decided to learn C++ a little over 2 years ago, just as Daved mentioned. As a reference material, the book is incredibly badly put together. The very first problem you have with it is the title as Herbert is actually, for all purposes making no distinction between C and C++. The whole notion of C/C++ Programming Language is a mistake. There is no such thing. But here you have a book author with catch phrases in the cover aiming at newbies, making such reference. A reference that goes beyond the title and spills into the book contents.

    Meanwhile there's very little of C++ on the book. The STL is covered in 6 pages. The C++ I/O system deserves only 8 pages and the old C++ header system is mentioned and deserves a comparatively high 6 pages to describe it in the context of the I/O objects and functions. All these three sections are at the end of the book and are frankly insufficient, giving rise for beginners to write C++ code that is heavily based on C objects, types and functions; a common mistake that this author always ignored on any of his books.

    The book also carries a heavy load of errors, bad advise and mistakes. Some of these that I carried on to this board and only here was I able to slowly start correcting them. Some of them I have noted down on the book and will be more than glad to share if anyone is willing to go through one big post.

    All in all, C/C++ Programmer's Reference by Herbert Schildt was the worst book I ever bought on C++. It was my first so I don't consider it a blooper. Still it serves as an example of what kind of stuff this "World-renowned programming author [...] of many best-sellers" (sic) teaches to those starting programming in C++.
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

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    YES

    Quote Originally Posted by JaWiB View Post
    The C++ Standard Library: A Tutorial and Reference by Nicolai M. Josuttis

    Lots of info on the STL. I wouldn't recommend it for beginners, but otherwise it's a great book, especially for reference.
    Josuttis is not only an expert in C++, but also in writing down his knowledge in a clear way. His book (together with Vandevoorde) C++ Templates is an absolute must for everyone who wants to know every small detail but also engineering techniques of templates.

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    I got some:
    The complete reference C++ the Third Edittion
    and
    C++ Annotations Version 7.2.0

  14. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by slickshoes View Post
    For those just getting their feet wet, much like myself, I'm gonna have to agree with Beene here and suggest SAMS Teach Yourself C++ in 21 Days. Theres tons of examples, and they rarely, if ever, implement multiple foreign concepts into the same example. Also, the author often explains some of the trickier concepts by comparing them to everyday situations that a newbie can understand.
    I like the ...in 21 Days books, but the C++ one i think can be discouraging for somebody just getting into programming. He dives into some serious stuff about classes without really discussing all the basic program flow techniques first. Which is important, but can leave a newbie feeling a bit overwhelmed and under informed if they wish to try to program some on their own before finishing all 500 pages of it. It's a great book with lots of information though, good for a beginner familiar with programming, or someone who needs a strong refresher.

    For absolute beginners, i'd say C++ Without Fear is a great starting spot.

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