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C++ Book Recommendations

This is a discussion on C++ Book Recommendations within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; " C++ How to Program , Fifth Edition By Deitel" Don't go for the older editions. Book is lengthy but ...

  1. #16
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    "C++ How to Program, Fifth Edition By Deitel"

    Don't go for the older editions. Book is lengthy but good. Great for Beginners and possibly intermediate programmers.

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    Computing Fundamentals with C++: Object-Oriented Programming & Design. Second Edition. Rick Mercer

    Great book for getting started with C++. Doubles as a good starter and a great reference.

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    Another source (besides ANSI) for The C/C++ Language Standards is The British Standards Institute. At about $75.00 USD each, the price is about 1/4 of the ANSI hard-copy price. (They are available from Amazon.)

    C++ Language Standard (BSI) = ISBN 0470846747
    C Language Standard (BSI) = ISBN: 0470845732

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    Can anyone advise me on a good book which includes GUI programming? I'm learning out of C++ How to Program (5th edition) at the moment which in my amateur opinion is a pretty good book, everything is explained and lots of exercises to do. Unfortunately they have omitted any GUI and event handling. They do have a separate book out for GUI but it was released in 2000 which I assume is a bit out of date.

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    Frequently Quite Prolix dwks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DougDbug
    Programming Windows, by Charles Petzold - This is the book for learning Windows Programming. You need to know standard C or C++ before starting this book.
    Look at some of the books already mentioned.
    dwk

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    Well a must read for all C++ serious programmers is:-
    "The Design and Evolution of C++" by Bjarne Stroustrup (Creator of C++).
    Far from being nasty and boring this books gives the detailed accounts of how many things got incorporated in the C++ and what was the motivation behind such things. So once you know the building blocks and know why were they put, you can be better programmer because you will understand the range of tools and whether your particular project demands such thing or not eg. <<, >> operator appended to cout, cin statement is nothing but one form of operator overloading that is overloading of bitwise operators.

  7. #22
    Just Lurking Dave_Sinkula's Avatar
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    Although I'm not a C++ guy and I don't have any of these, I thought I'd drop my (hopefully) better-late-than-never post:
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Sinkula
    With regard to C++ books, I'll just echo the advice here.
    The following books are recommended; read them in mostly the order listed.
    Proper credit: vawjr, who now has this posted.

    The following is also recommended.
    C++ Coding Standards : 101 Rules, Guidelines, and Best Practices, Herb Sutter, Andrei Alexandrescu
    Quote Originally Posted by Daved
    Consider adding C++ Coding Standards to that list. It is by Sutter and Alexandrescu, and has an excellent compilation and mini-discussion of many of the topics discussed in greater detail in the other books. It is not a coding standards book, but rather a guide to best practices in C++ code and would fit perfectly as an introduction or summary of many of the other books on that list (after Accelerated C++).
    Book reviews can also be found at www.accu.org: Beginner's C++.
    No apologies for duplication with other recommendations in this thread -- consider it a double recommendation for the book!
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    C++ For Dummies - 5th Edition by Stephen Randy Davis

    This is a great book to get started with C++. Teaches all the basic fundementals.

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    C++ Annotations

    This is a book for people who already know C to pick up C++ (thus it is free of the cruft you get in "comprehensive" C++ texts). And it's available on the Intertron.
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  10. #25
    Its hard... But im here swgh's Avatar
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    Teach yourself C++ in 24 hours. Good book but a poor CD. It uses Borland Builder X which
    is a little dated. I still own this book now and use it for cross checking a reference
    I'm just trying to be a better person - My Name Is Earl

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    Quote Originally Posted by lawina
    "C++ How to Program, Fifth Edition By Deitel"

    Don't go for the older editions. Book is lengthy but good. Great for Beginners and possibly intermediate programmers.


    that`s the book wich i take it as a text book in my university but with 4th edition

    it`s relly good and simple to understand

  12. #27
    MFC killed my cat! manutd's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mburt
    C++ For Dummies - 5th Edition by Stephen Randy Davis

    This is a great book to get started with C++. Teaches all the basic fundementals.
    Not really. It teaches C style C++.
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  13. #28
    Its hard... But im here swgh's Avatar
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    that`s the book wich i take it as a text book in my university but with 4th edition
    I had the fourth edition before I bought the fifth. The new one is a lot more spaced out, and they have shortened the chapters down. i know it is pricey ( 30.00 ) but much more of the code has been updated, eg: early classes and tree-lists are also added. I reccomend getting the fifth edition now, and it does away with that dreadful elevator simulation too.
    I'm just trying to be a better person - My Name Is Earl

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    C++ in a Nutshell

    If you don't already own it, and you think of yourself as a C++ programmer, then you probably want to have this excellent book in your arsenal.

    http://www.amazon.com/C%2B%2B-Nutshe...285211-9351077

    :davis:

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    Quote Originally Posted by Frenzied
    Can anyone advise me on a good book which includes GUI programming? I'm learning out of C++ How to Program (5th edition) at the moment which in my amateur opinion is a pretty good book, everything is explained and lots of exercises to do. Unfortunately they have omitted any GUI and event handling. They do have a separate book out for GUI but it was released in 2000 which I assume is a bit out of date.
    Since you do not indicate a platform preference, I'd strongly recommend using Qt as your GUI library so that the programs you write will be more platform independent. Here is a fantastic Qt book, which includes a CD with all of the free versions of Qt for common platforms (Unix, Mac, Windoze)

    http://www.amazon.com/C%2B%2B-GUI-Pr...285211-9351077

    :davis:

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