C++ Books

This is a discussion on C++ Books within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; Greetings. I realize there's another "C++ Books" thread on this page, but I have different questions. Let me introduce myself ...

  1. #1
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    C++ Books

    Greetings. I realize there's another "C++ Books" thread on this page, but I have different questions.

    Let me introduce myself first. I'm currently a high school student. In a year, I'll be studying Computer Science in college, and then in university, to finally, and hopefully, become a game programmer. Currently, I mod and level edit for Star Wars Jedi Knight: Dark Forces 2 (I know it's a really old game, but as soon as I get a new PC, I'll move on). Nevertheless, I wanted to start programming with an independent language. After long researches, I concluded that I will learn those programming languages/APIs (in order of learning) before beginning to program game engines:


    - C++
    - C
    - OpenGL
    - DirectX
    - Visual Basic (learn in college)
    - Java (learn in college)
    - C#


    So I was looking for C++ books to help me learning before I go to college. Unfortunately, I bought "Sam's Teach Yourself in 21 days" some time ago. That was a mistake. However, I'm half way through the book, and I learned some basic C++ features (Functions, classes, loops, pointers, references, overloading, etc.) Now, I'd like to buy better books that explain the language fully. I was considering "C++ Primer Plus", by Stephen Prata, and "The C++ Standard Library" , by Jossutis, to start with.

    Did anyone read those books? Are those good choices for someone like me? If not, please suggest books that you think are good for beginners like me.

    Thanks.

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    Accelerated C++ is always an excellent choice, and as you have started off with the 21 days book, the accelerated nature of the book might be perfect for you. It teaches C++ style C++ (as I said in the other thread) which is important but rare among beginner books. C++ Primer by Lippman, Lajoie and Moo is also a solid choice.

    The C++ Standard Library by Josuttis is an excellent reference, but I'm not sure if it will help you much now in your learning. It is not a language introduction, it only covers a large part of the standard library. You will need it and use it eventually, but probably not so much now. If you want a more advanced book, consider C++ Coding Standards. It is small and easy to read, but will likely be over your head even after you complete your beginner book. However, it is an excellent source because it gives you best practices and references the books that go into detail on why they are best practices.

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    I got the learn C++ in 21 days too. I didnt think it was that bad. Theres no way you could learn in 21 days though But you can skip around a bit. I was actually about done with week one when i dropped it. But i have been feeling recently up for a challenge so im working on it again

    Good luck, im looking for a good book for win32 API now. Id also like to learn some game stuff, so i suppose im game for a good OpenGL book too. I just like to take things one step at a time. IMO the best place to help learn is here. Guys like Daved here are a big help when you get stuck in a tight spot.

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    Demistyfied C++ is good choice.! But it's without GUI
    Sorry for spelling errors, not English!
    xxxrugby: "All Human Race Will Die From My Hand!"
    xxxrugby: "We are all philosophers, when question is about politics!"

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    thinking in c++ by bruce eckel is one i always recommend.. havent looked at them but you cant usually go wrong with oreilly..

    i would suggest finding the pdf or chm version of them and checking them out before you buy.. i hate when i buy a worthless book.. of all the things i could waste my money on. bad books are the least fun..

    im pretty sure i have seen all of these books around the web for download..

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    Registered User xxxrugby's Avatar
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    im pretty sure i have seen all of these books around the web for download..
    Yep. I download them all. lol
    Sorry for spelling errors, not English!
    xxxrugby: "All Human Race Will Die From My Hand!"
    xxxrugby: "We are all philosophers, when question is about politics!"

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    Check out Beginning C++ Game Programming:

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/159...books&v=glance

    Or Ivor Horton's Beginning C++.

  8. #8
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    I have some advice for you.

    Learn Scheme (in addition to everything else).

    You probably won't end up using it for making anything, but you'll be able to approach problems in different ways. Scheme is a simple language and a small investment of time, and uses a style of programming that is sufficiently different from C++ and friends. And having known it may make some comp sci classes easier for you down the road. Variants of Scheme are sometimes used in game development, too. I've found that the way I use C++ has changed (for the better) since doing time with Scheme.

    As an aside, I bet that by the time you get to Visual Basic, you'll just skip it and go to C#. (They're not teaching VB in college, are they? Please tell me they aren't.)

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    semi-colon generator ChaosEngine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Darklighter
    After long researches, I concluded that I will learn those programming languages/APIs (in order of learning) before beginning to program game engines:


    - C++
    - C
    - OpenGL
    - DirectX
    - Visual Basic (learn in college)
    - Java (learn in college)
    - C#
    Presumably since you want to learn DX/OGL you want to make games. I would suggest you start with Python and PyGame. This will give you an insight into developing games without worrying about the gotchas of C++. From there I'd move to directx with C#; this will let you learn about 3D graphics (again without the pain of C++)

    Then I'd learn C++.

    Java is useful, but I can't really see any use for VB over C#.

    In the long run, languages aren't as important as learning good design principles. Once you become competent in one language, you should easily be able to pick up another.
    "I saw a sign that said 'Drink Canada Dry', so I started"
    -- Brendan Behan

    Free Compiler: Visual C++ 2005 Express
    If you program in C++, you need Boost. You should also know how to use the Standard Library (STL). Want to make games? After reading this, I don't like WxWidgets anymore. Want to add some scripting to your App?

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