books for learning c++

This is a discussion on books for learning c++ within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; I've heard Accelerated C++: Practical Programming by Example is good. Is it the best, and are there any other books ...

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    books for learning c++

    I've heard Accelerated C++: Practical Programming by Example is good. Is it the best, and are there any other books I might want to get?

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    How much experience do you have?

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    I don't think you could name any single book the best, especially since there are different levels of C++ books. But Accelerated C++: Practical Programming by Example is definitely top three of the best books to learn the basics from. Another choice would be C++ Primer Plus: 5th Edition or Game Programming in C++. Personally I think I've seen Accelerated C++: Practical Programming by Example the best rated, recommended, and would probably be the highest in a poll.

    Once you do away with a beginner book or two, it would be a good idea to move onto The C++ Programming Language (not for beginners).
    Warning: Have doubt in anything I post.

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    Frequently Quite Prolix dwks's Avatar
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    In my opinion, anything you get will probably be better than your Dummies one.
    Last edited by dwks; 12-06-2005 at 11:27 AM. Reason: silly 'u' key wasn't working
    dwk

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    IT MUST B HARD 2 SEARCH DA BOARDS!1!1 WTF.
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    Search the forum for "books". You'll find lots of discussion, mostly regarding beginning books.

    My beginning book was Teach Yourself C++ In 21 Days, by Jesse Liberty. It’s easy to understand and well organized for self-study with questions & exercises at the end of each “day” (chapter) and answers & solutions in the back. WARNING – This book is controversial… some people hate it!

    On the other hand, I’ve NEVER read anything negative about Accelerated C++.

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    Haha, my first book was Teach Yourself C++ In 21 Days too. It was the 2nd ed. though. I'd like to clear up my opinion on the book, even though no one cares, since when I was new I thought it was good, and stated that on these forums. I don't like its long-winded approach to teaching a concept and its overly-developed source code (that force you to never skip around, even though I didnt try). It was very bad, especially compared to the three I listed in my last post, and I don't recommend it. The 5th ed. is out though, by Jesse again, and is still getting bad ratings - well.. 3/5 is better than 1/5 on the older versions. I see no point in getting it ($15 more for a great book is worth it).
    Warning: Have doubt in anything I post.

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    The guy who updated the 21 days book for the latest edition runs the codeguru site which is full of people who stress the importance of proper C++ technique. It is my impression that he would prefer future editions of that book to be closer to the Accelerated C++ style of teaching C++ instead of C, so I wouldn't be surprised if it eventually becomes a good alternative for those who aren't "accelerated".

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    i heard teach yourself C++ in 21 days was good
    Verbal Irony >>

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    I've heard Accelerated C++: Practical Programming by Example is good.
    I've looked at it, and in my opinion it's probably too difficult for 90% of beginning programmers. However, it's a fairly short book, so you won't have invested too much time if it turns out it doesn't work for you.

    An easier book is "C++: A Beginner's Guide".
    Last edited by 7stud; 12-06-2005 at 05:23 PM.

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    7stud, would you say you learned your good C++ technique and knowledge from that book or from internet forums like this one? My guess is that you've learned a lot of new things about C++ since finishing that book. For example, you smartly advise new C++ students to use the C++ string class when first learning. Isn't that not what Schildt's book teaches? Looking on amazon shows that vectors isn't even in the index.

    I agree that there isn't an agreed-upon best choice (or maybe even any good options) for beginner level C++ book teaching C++ techniques, but in the absence of one I'd suggest the slightly more difficult but better book over the easier one.

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    I like using C++ How to program by Deitel & Deitel

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    Sorry, should have searched first , this is probably asked often, but thanks for all your replys anyway. I'm pretty much a complete beginner, learned how to write my first "Hello world" program a few weeks ago. C++ is quickly becoming very time consuming and addictive . The only programing class I could take (and am taking) only deals with microsoft visual basic.

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    My guess is that you've learned a lot of new things about C++ since finishing that book.
    I learned beginning C++ from "Ivor Horton's Beginning C++", which I also think is probably too difficult for 90% of beginnning programmers. However, I subsequently tried to learn Java with Ivor Horton's "Beginning Java 2", and I found it was too difficult for me. A couple of years later I read "Java 2: A Beginner's Guide" which is by the same author as "C++: A Beginner's Guide" and I was impressed by how good the book was.

    The problem with languages like C++ and Java is that there is so much to learn, the 1,000 page beginning books are too daunting. I am starting to be of the opinion that shorter and easier books are the way to go for beginners.

    would you say you learned your good C++ technique and knowledge from that book or from internet forums like this one?
    Both, but I think forums are really invaluable for learning computer programming.

    Isn't that not what Schildt's book teaches? Looking on amazon shows that vectors isn't even in the index.
    It doesn't surprise me that he doesn't cover vectors. I think it's too bad that the inventors of the STL even chose the name "vector". I think most beginners are going to be uneasy with the name alone. What's a "vector"?

    I think Accelerated C++'s approach to teaching C++ is unique and interesting, but I just don't think most beginner's are going to understand it.
    Last edited by 7stud; 12-06-2005 at 06:55 PM.

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    Then why do you (IMO correctly) advise beginners to use C++ tools like string and vector? Accelerated C++ is unique only because the other books are outdated or written by people who aren't C++ experts (like Schildt). I would love to see an easier to understand beginners book that teaches C++ properly, but does one exist?

    Until that question is answered, advising beginners to use books like Schildt's that do not teach C++ style C++ is counter-productive, again IMHO.

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