cout << (_int64 object)

This is a discussion on cout << (_int64 object) within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; using VC++ 6.0 compiler, how to use cout to display an _int64 object. Is there a solution with that compiler? ...

  1. #1
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    cout << (_int64 object)

    using VC++ 6.0 compiler, how to use cout to display an _int64 object. Is there a solution with that compiler?
    Code:
    #include <iostream>
    using namespace std;
    
    int main()
    {
       _int64 x;
       cout << x;
    
      return 0;
    }
    error message
    Code:
    error C2593: 'operator <<' is ambiguous

  2. #2
    Sweet
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    Use a better compiler? Even then I don't know if that would suppport a _int64
    Last edited by prog-bman; 10-20-2005 at 03:16 PM.
    Woop?

  3. #3
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    It works for me on VC 6.0. You may need to install a service pack or get a fix from dinkumware or download a different version of the standard library (I think I'm using 3.08 which is not the one that ships with VC 6).

    BTW, I thought it was supposed to be __int64, although _int64 also works for me.

  4. #4
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    I do get that error if I use <iostream.h>, make sure you are using <iostream>.

  5. #5
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    I have SP5 installed. overloading the << operator works.
    Code:
    ostream& operator<<(ostream& out, _int64 n)
    {
    	printf("%I64d", n);
    	return out;
    }
    Last edited by Ancient Dragon; 10-20-2005 at 03:31 PM.

  6. #6
    Just Lurking Dave_Sinkula's Avatar
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    Isn't it better to avoid mixing printf and cout?
    Code:
    ostream& operator<< (ostream &o, _int64 n)
    {
       char buffer [ sizeof n * CHAR_BIT + 1 ]; /* plenty of space */
       sprintf(buffer, "%I64d", n);
       return o << buffer;
    }
    7. It is easier to write an incorrect program than understand a correct one.
    40. There are two ways to write error-free programs; only the third one works.*

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave_Sinkula
    Isn't it better to avoid mixing
    normally -- yes. sprintf() and printf() both use the same routines to parse the format specification string, so it doesn't really matter which one of those are used. and cout and printf() call the same low-level printing functions in some implementations, such as VC++ 6.0 where they both call with win32 api function WriteFile().


    I suppose some compilers/platforms may have some serious objects about mixing iostream library functions with standard C file functions, but I have never had any problems with any Microsoft compilers (yet!).

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