compilers-advice?

This is a discussion on compilers-advice? within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; hi...which of the following compiler is the best to use: 1)vc++(6.0 or 7.1) 2)dev c++ (4.0 or 5.0beta) 3) GNU ...

  1. #1
    ~Team work is the best!~ wakish's Avatar
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    compilers-advice?

    hi...which of the following compiler is the best to use:

    1)vc++(6.0 or 7.1)
    2)dev c++ (4.0 or 5.0beta)
    3) GNU C/C++ compiler


    and btw i just found that there is a microsoft free "Express" vesion of Visual Studio.NET in now available, is it good to use and compile C++ codes?

    Tnx for ur attention!


    Kind Regards,
    wakish

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    depends on what you want to do with the compiler? write MS-Windows applications, then use .NET compiler and related tools. Just to learn c++ language, then Dev-C++ is better. I believe it uses minigw compiler. GNU compiler is useful for keepning source code portable between *nix and MS-Windows operating systems, or where you already know *nix g++.

    Don't bother with VC++ 6.0 for new programs because that compiler is older than current standards and obviously not very c++ standards compliant.

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    Registered User Queatrix's Avatar
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    Just look at the last word in the first line of my sig.
    Free download too.
    Last edited by Queatrix; 09-30-2005 at 04:43 PM.

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    ~Team work is the best!~ wakish's Avatar
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    ok..but which Def C++ is good; the version 4 or the 5beta version??
    because since the version 5 is a beta version, is it good to use?


    btw Ancient Dragon i'm planning to do more than just learning C++.
    What would u advice me in this case man?

    Btw all i want is a good stable, reliable, good interface looking and standard compliant compiler to enjoy C++ as it should be.

    Tnx for ur attention and kind helps!

    Regards,
    wakish

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    If you have the $$$ (about 500 to 1000 USD), buy Visual Studio 2003 .NET Pro version or want another month or so for 2005 to be released. If you are a student with student credentials you can get educational version for about $100.00 USD. Excellent IDE and programming/debugging tools and support.

    Comeau is the most iso standard compliant compiler in the world. And it only costs a mere $50.00 USD! I haven't used it, but it looks good on their web site. The company has been around for many many years and I would expect them to be around for many more in the future.

    Borland has a free compiler c++ builder compiler but again I don't know how good or bad it is. Stay away from their Turbo C free compilers, they are just too ancient to be of much value for anyone except some very backward educational institutions.

    For Dev-C++, I wouldn't use a beta version, not worth the hassle.
    Last edited by Ancient Dragon; 09-30-2005 at 05:20 PM.

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    If you are planning on working as a C++ developer on windows, I would suggest learning Visual C++, EVERY place I have worked at use that and I've worked at quite a few places. One of them used Borland C++ Builder for a time but it was horribly buggy and we only used it because the original designer was a delphi programmer and couldn't develop a GUI without a point and click interface.

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    I don't know much about the Dev-C++ debugger, if there is one other than gdb, but the Visual Studio debugger is a fantastic tool if you can afford version 7.1 or higher.

  8. #8
    ~Team work is the best!~ wakish's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ancient Dragon
    If you have the $$$ (about 500 to 1000 USD), buy Visual Studio 2003 .NET Pro version or want another month or so for 2005 to be released. If you are a student with student credentials you can get educational version for about $100.00 USD. Excellent IDE and programming/debugging tools and support.

    Comeau is the most iso standard compliant compiler in the world. And it only costs a mere $50.00 USD! I haven't used it, but it looks good on their web site. The company has been around for many many years and I would expect them to be around for many more in the future.

    Borland has a free compiler c++ builder compiler but again I don't know how good or bad it is. Stay away from their Turbo C free compilers, they are just too ancient to be of much value for anyone except some very backward educational institutions.

    For Dev-C++, I wouldn't use a beta version, not worth the hassle.


    ok..tnx for the valuable infos...
    i have viewed the comeau sites..it seems to be solid too!

    btw i can use the Visual C++ Express Edition Beta 2 ??

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    Quote Originally Posted by wakish
    btw i can use the Visual C++ Express Edition Beta 2 ??
    Depends on what you want to use it for. You can't use it to create commercial programs for sale. But I see no reason why you can't use it for your own use. You will have to read M$ license agreement. Just be aware that the compiler has bugs -- that's what a beta means

  10. #10
    ~Team work is the best!~ wakish's Avatar
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    yeah. .that's y i'm confused about using it..since i dn't like using beta versions

    btw i have just downloaded it, it's only 2.66Mb

  11. #11
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    Don't bother with VC++, its a waste of time to use when you are first learning. I would only use it for projects, or commercial work really.

    Dev-Cpp is easy to use, to the point, quick to get a program or test running.
    Warning: Have doubt in anything I post.

    GCC 4.5, Boost 1.40, Code::Blocks 8.02, Ubuntu 9.10 010001000110000101100101

  12. #12
    ~Team work is the best!~ wakish's Avatar
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    yeah...i think i will spend some time with devC++ 4..then later on i'll see...
    tnx!

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    Actually, Dev-C++ uses a version of the GNU compiler. It's a complete IDE (Integrated Development Environment). It's quite popular, and it has a good reputation. (I don't know what the beta situation is. Like most open-source projects, there is almost always a beta version available.)

    I always recommend that beginners start-out with a popular compiler. Compilers / IDEs are not the easiest programs to set-up and use. If you get a popular one, it's easier to find someone to help you.

    If your funds are limited, I recommend spending $100 on two or three programming books, rather than on a compiler.

    The free beta Microsoft IDEs use the same underlying compiler as the commercial programs. I suspect that the ploy behind the beta-express line is to get students hooked on Microsoft development tools.

    Ancient Dragon is right. If you are a student, the academic version of Visual Studio is an unbeatable deal!!! If you are not a student, you can but Visual C++ Standard for $100. Or, Visual Studio 2005 Standard for $300.


    You can't use it to create commercial programs for sale.
    And, Ancient Dragon is wrong. From Micro$oft's FAQ:
    What can I do with the Express products?

    Learn how to program using a streamlined, lightweight development environment with built-in tutorial content
    Evaluate the .NET Framework for Windows and Web development
    Create fun and interesting applications for their personal enjoyment or to share with their friends, or even commercially distribute your programs.
    In the past (and maybe still) some of Microsoft's academic compilers were only for non-commercial use. Some would generate an exe file that wouldn't even run unless Visual C++ was installed on the target machine!

    ...Visual C++, EVERY place I have worked at use that...
    Good point. When you're looking for your first job, it wouldn't hurt to say "I use Visual Studio at home."
    Last edited by DougDbug; 09-30-2005 at 07:24 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DougDbug
    Good point. When you're looking for your first job, it wouldn't hurt to say "I use Visual Studio at home."
    Yes, I can tell you from experience that when you interview people, and you have 20 candidates who have equiv. experience, you go with the one who knows the tools you use. It's a real pain in the neck to get 50 questions a day related to how to use VC++ IDE from the new guy.

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    Reverse Engineer maxorator's Avatar
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    I prefer Dev-C++ 5.0 beta(4.9.9.2)

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