Is C++.NET worthwhile?

This is a discussion on Is C++.NET worthwhile? within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; I'm in the middle of studying C++ right now, but I'm wondering if C++.NET is worthwhile in learning afterwards. I ...

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    Is C++.NET worthwhile?

    I'm in the middle of studying C++ right now, but I'm wondering if C++.NET is worthwhile in learning afterwards. I already studied C#, btw. The syntax seems pretty strange for C++.NET, too. What can it do? Can it work with Managed DirectX, ASP.NET, etc. with ease?

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    Cat without Hat CornedBee's Avatar
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    It's a language mostly intended for wrapping traditional C++ libraries for their use from .Net. I highly recommend you desist from using it for anything else - its weird syntax makes it tiresome and error-prone.

    If you know both C++ and C#, then learning Managed C++ is a matter of a few hours at most.
    All the buzzt!
    CornedBee

    "There is not now, nor has there ever been, nor will there ever be, any programming language in which it is the least bit difficult to write bad code."
    - Flon's Law

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    Agreed. Managed C++ seems like an odd after-thought. If you have legacy code that you don't want to or can't port over to C#, then use Managed C++ to make a wrapper. Otherwise, steer clear.
    If I did your homework for you, then you might pass your class without learning how to write a program like this. Then you might graduate and get your degree without learning how to write a program like this. You might become a professional programmer without knowing how to write a program like this. Someday you might work on a project with me without knowing how to write a program like this. Then I would have to do you serious bodily harm. - Jack Klein

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    Alright, I'll keep that in mind. Thanks.

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    Registered User Frobozz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pianorain
    Managed C++ seems like an odd after-thought.
    Probably started as an attempt to convert people to .NET. If you're going to use .NET, you might as well just use C#.

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    Either you're serious, or I took this the wrong way. Either way, I felt like sharing this thought. Side wars keep coming up when someone mentions .NET in a Java forum, etc. This is getting rediculous.

    If you're referring to me, I'm a general programmer - I don't take sides. Many people do on forums, and it's really depressing. For instance, your boss wants you to use .NET for a certain project. Are you going to be prepared, or are you going to say, "Ew! .NET. Yucky." What if one of your programmers starts talking about a philosophy on why MS is the devil when you're trying to get a .NET project done? He'd be fired, and he'd end up at a common forum.

    It's true that any programmer prefers a certain language for their personal projects, but it doesn't work like that in the real world, sorry. I enjoy programming, not C++, not .NET., not Java. Just programming If you take sides, you're a fool. Programming is not politics.
    Last edited by dxfoo; 09-07-2005 at 04:29 PM.

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    Hooray C++!!!
    Adam

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    Horray for C++ indeed.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dxfoo
    Either you're serious...[snip unsolicited tirade]
    I agree with Frobozz quite completely. If you're going to use .Net, then use any other language than Managed C++ if you can. Some languages are simply a pain to work with. Managed C++ is one of those languages.
    If I did your homework for you, then you might pass your class without learning how to write a program like this. Then you might graduate and get your degree without learning how to write a program like this. You might become a professional programmer without knowing how to write a program like this. Someday you might work on a project with me without knowing how to write a program like this. Then I would have to do you serious bodily harm. - Jack Klein

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    Managed C++ seems like an odd after-thought.
    At least it's got static class constructors.

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    Registered User Frobozz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dxfoo
    For instance, your boss wants you to use .NET for a certain project. Are you going to be prepared, or are you going to say, "Ew! .NET. Yucky." What if one of your programmers starts talking about a philosophy on why MS is the devil when you're trying to get a .NET project done? He'd be fired, and he'd end up at a common forum.
    C++ and C# are both .NET. If your boss says "Use .NET" then you can just pick C#. I've never tried C++ .NET and I don't intend to start now. Why use something that was never designed to use .NET and will be a pain to use it for?

    Usually an employer will ask you to use the product that he thinks will get the job done quickly and with little or no mistakes. I seriously doubt he'd tell you to use C++ .NET.

    And I seriously doubt a lead programmer or somebody above you would choose it. Most likely they'd pick something that is quick and highly efficient.

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    I agree, but I also don't think you'll be hired right when a new project is ready to be programmed. I'm sure by the time you get there, they're already halfway through a VB.NET program, or C++.NET, or C#, etc. It usually doesn't start from scratch. But yeah, C# does sound like it's worthwhile after C++. If any code is used for .NET pseudocode, it's usually C#, from what I noticed.

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    Why don't you just ask your boss if he's ever going to make you use C++.NET?
    P.S. As a general programmer, how many programming languages do you know?
    Adam

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    Dump Truck Internet valis's Avatar
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    You might as well familiarize yourself with C++.net, for the most part the syntax of a language is trivial, even a jump from C to Lisp is fairly easy to do if you are an experienced programmer, it's a new set of words (syntax), but for the most part the sentence structure is the same (logic). If you spend a week becoming familiar with a new language you can at least infer enough from other sources to get the hang of it and you look like you know what's going on, even if you only partially do.

    You might run in to some radically high level features when studying a new language but those usually make the work easier, not harder, so it's again generally trivial.

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    Quote Originally Posted by beanroaster
    Why don't you just ask your boss if he's ever going to make you use C++.NET?
    P.S. As a general programmer, how many programming languages do you know?
    Enough, I hope lol. Most include C, PHP, Java, C#, VB.NET, ASP.NET, and halfway through my C++ reference book. I kinda to get into graphics, but the code looks mighty long and obscure w/ C++, but that's for another discussion.

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