I'm new and need your help.

This is a discussion on I'm new and need your help. within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; First of all, Hi to everyone! I've always wanted to do programming and now( at the age of 14 ) ...

  1. #1
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    I'm new and need your help.

    First of all, Hi to everyone!
    I've always wanted to do programming and now( at the age of 14 ) i've decided to start to learn C++. I want to be able to make nice abordable programs and video games. I've already tried programs which allow you to easily make video games, but i don't find them satisfactory, because you don't actually create anything! You just use a program made by someone else and use pre-defined tools. That's why i started C++.
    i'd like to know whats the easiest way of leaningC++.
    actually, i just want your advices
    hope you can help me,
    thank you

  2. #2
    Newbie Finneous's Avatar
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    You might want to purchase some books and read tutorials and articles online. And - this one is the most important - practice and play around. If you do not have a compiler, there are some available for free. However, I recommend using Microsoft Visual C++ ;p

  3. #3
    Registered User major_small's Avatar
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    well, let me tell you now, that's a VERY long road you're heading down, but it's well worth the effort if it's really what you want to do.

    a good start is the tutorials on this here site, but IMO, you should get a tutor or instructor or knowledgeable friend that can help you through them.
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    >Finneous : I've got DevC++,but i'll try out microsoft visual C++
    >major-small :yeah you're right, it's going to be a long road, that's why i started now, i'm still 14 and i've got some years ahead of me before going to university.
    my fist question would be: why in some tutorials, they start with

    #include <iostream>

    using namespace std;

    int main()

    and in others:

    #include <iostream.h>

    int main()

    they both work and i can use them but why are they written differently. my guess is that with <iostream.h> we don't need to add "using namespace std;"
    Last edited by cader; 08-02-2005 at 05:57 AM.

  5. #5
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    iostream.h is the "older" version, and lacks a few things that the newer one (without the .h extension) has, and is not standard compliant.

    my advice: stick around C++ forums and communities like this one and try to be an active member, whether you're asking questions or sharing your own knowledge. It'll help you develop your own skills.

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    Computer languages change over time, and the old methods become deprecated, which means you are not supposed to use them anymore. C++ has a governing body that decides what is and what isn't acceptable practice, and what new features should be added, and what old features should be eliminated.

    Don't use the second syntax. Use the first syntax. Whoever wrote the tutorial didn't know what they were doing or else the tutorial is very old and was written before the standards changed.

  7. #7
    Frequently Quite Prolix dwks's Avatar
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    I've got DevC++
    Dev-C++ is a really good compiler, and you likely won't need anything better for a long time.
    dwk

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  8. #8
    Registered User major_small's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 7stud
    Don't use the second syntax. Use the first syntax. Whoever wrote the tutorial didn't know what they were doing or else the tutorial is very old and was written before the standards changed.
    the tutorials are dated. the people that wrote them were/are very knowledgeable, and unfortunately some of them haven't been seen around for a while.
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  9. #9
    Covenent Killer
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    i use:
    Code:
    #include <iostream>
    
    using namespace std;
    
    int main()
    {
        cout << "Hello World" << endl;
        cin.get();
    }
    Very basic code -- the using namespace std basically gets rid of having to keeping typing std::cout -- saves ya time

    The cin.get(); is basically saying untill the user presses enter. A good book I recommend is C++ for dummies, the 7 book edition, it gives you all the stuff you need for C++ and then gets you started into Visual C++. I got mine for around $34.99 and I've learned quite a bit in 2 months -- it will take time though, and dont be afraid to ask... I know how you feel cus im 15 and i started some time back... that book taught me alot, along with the people on this message board.

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    I am also a noob to C++.

    I was wondering if these books are good.

    C++ Primer (3rd Edition)
    Programming Windows (5th Edition)

    Books I have:

    Tricks of the 3d Game Programming Gurus (in C... so the programming itself doesn't really help me but the concepts of game programming do)

    Visual C++ 6 (good book, except focuses on an old compiler and old programming style (as said earlier in this thread))


    My goal is game programming as well...and I want to learn the Win32 API and all of C++ before I even touch DirectX/WinFX/OpenGL.

  11. #11
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    uh, i have the Visual C++ 6 book, and I feel it was good, but i got lost in the beginning...
    this is "Visual C++ 6 In Record Time -- Teach Yourself the 14 Essential Skills" by Steven Holzner right?

  12. #12
    Learning the art of C++
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    An EXCELLENT book to learn c++ (for the absolute beginner to understand even) is "Problem Solving with C++: The object of programming" 4th edition, by Walter Savitch. It has good tutorials in it, and will really help you to understand how c++ works.

  13. #13
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    If you have former programming experience (in other languages), I'd recommend all the online tutorials you can find. Of course, do not be afraid to ask for help, it will help. Finally, once you've learned hte basics, and are an expert at command line programming, don't be scared off by Windows programming. Several years ago, this happened to me on my first attempt at C++. I looked at Win32 API programming, and it looked nasty. I said trash this, and wasted several years of my life in Visual Basic.

    I gave C++ a second try, but completely skipped Win32 programming, and went directly from command line to OpenGL/SDL. I'd recommend bypassing Win32 programming for a while, and instead skip directly to API's such as SDL or OpenGL (you'll be using these for your goal, game programming, anyway) once you've
    gotten the hang of the language.

    Its much more rewarding, more mentally/logically challenging, yet less confusing IMHO.
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  14. #14
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    Win32 programming isnt nasty, its as "nasty" as any graphical API could be.

    IMHO you should learn win32API first so you know what is going on behind windows apps and how you can use it to your advantage when making games.

  15. #15
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    To the OP:

    I am in almost the same position as you. I'm 15 and just started programming about 2 months ago. I'm certainly no expert on any programming subject, but I can give you some suggestions based on what has worked for me so far.

    First off, let me say this: there's no substitute for a good ole' fashioned book. Online tutorials will never be able to give the depth and coverage that books can. Besides that, it's also nice to be able to kick back and relax instead of being tied to a computer screen all day. Overall, I found learning from books a much more helpful and enjoyable experience than learning from online tutorials.

    As far as that goes, the two books that I used were Teach Yourself C++ in 21 Days and C++: A Beginner's Guide. Between the two I was able to get a pretty nice understanding of the basics of C++. If I didn't understand a concept after reading about it in one book, I would usually get it after reading the second. After I finished reading through these books and creating a bunch of little games like Guess The Number, I made a text-based RPG as my "final project" before moving on to 2D graphic games, which is where I'm at now.

    After learning the basics of the language, as I am currently finding out, things get much tougher. After finishing both beginner books I picked up Tricks of the Windows Game Programming Gurus, thinking I would be able to pick it up as quickly as I did C++. I was wrong While learning C++ is more about understanding concepts than memorizing function definitions and syntax, Windows seems to be the other way around. When I first saw how many lines it took to create the simplest window possible, I have to admit I almost cried .

    With that in mind, I would recommend going from C++ beginner's books straight into some SDL tutorials. While SDL may not be as powerful or as useful as Windows or DirectX, it was great to find that I was able to make a fully functional Pong clone after a day or two of learning. To do the same in Windows could have taken me over a month. To actually see something up and running on the screen was a great confidence booster. Also, with SDL you are still forced to deal elements of Windows programming such as events, so it works as a nice stepping stone to Windows and DirectX.

    Anyway, that's just the route I took. It might not be the best one, and it's certainly not the only one, but it's the one that worked for me. Hopefully this helps you out, and good luck

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