I'm new and need your help.

This is a discussion on I'm new and need your help. within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; Thanx everyone for your help and i'll follow your advice into buying some books on C++. For the moment, i've ...

  1. #16
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    Thanx everyone for your help and i'll follow your advice into buying some books on C++.
    For the moment, i've learned and understood till the if statements,the loops,pointers(still working on it), and some more which ihaven't totally inmind.
    When i learn from a book or from a tutorial(like now) do i have to learn it by heart ? Do i have to learn each and every boolean sign,or....by heart ? or should i just understand them and be able to find out what they mean while reading a program code?
    thanx

  2. #17
    Registered User major_small's Avatar
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    well, look at it this way - try to retain as much as you can. you can't know everything about the language. all of us use references to some extent from time to time.

    when you go on to learn other languages, you'll quickly notice that alot of the things are the same. they all have generally the same looping structures, selection structures, etc. eventually you'll be able to seperate the science from the syntax.

    right now it's tough because you're trying to learn the science and a syntax at the same time, but after you get a better grasp of it, it'll seem much easier.
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  3. #18
    and the hat of wrongness Salem's Avatar
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    The first step is to learn how to program, because without that step knowing C++ wont actually help you that much, except to perhaps recognise some code as being C++ when you see it. This is a very distinct step from learning a programming language.

    Eg. I am a carpenter, you simply know how to hammer a nail in.
    If you want to make it to being a carpenter, get nice and comfy, it's a long road.

    Because you WILL need to know a lot more about how to design programs, organise your code into managable components with reasonable interfaces if you're ever going to achieve your aims.

    Oh, and while you're at it, read this
    So you think you can learn C or C++ in 21 days?
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  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by cader
    Thanx everyone for your help and i'll follow your advice into buying some books on C++.
    For the moment, i've learned and understood till the if statements,the loops,pointers(still working on it), and some more which ihaven't totally inmind.
    When i learn from a book or from a tutorial(like now) do i have to learn it by heart ? Do i have to learn each and every boolean sign,or....by heart ? or should i just understand them and be able to find out what they mean while reading a program code?
    thanx

    Well... remembering the syntax by heart cannot be a bad thing, but I don't think it's necessary for you at this point. When just starting out, I would worry more about the general concepts and how to program in general than the syntax of your particular language. With time you will remember the syntax just through coding. The concepts, on the other hand, must be understood to make programming possible, whether you know the syntax by heart or not.

  5. #20
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    thanx for the advice!
    by the way, i found a book : "Thinking in C++" written by Bruce Eckel, which is available in bookstores and in acrobat pdf format for free on his website(www.bruceeckel.com). I started reading it and like you said, books make you understand more in depth than tutorials.
    well...i've got 417 pages to read as well as the second volume of the book.

  6. #21
    Skunkmeister Stoned_Coder's Avatar
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    Use Accelerated c++ and c++ primer and forums like this one to get a grasp on c++.
    Use certain books often called style guides( believe me they are so much more) to learn to use what you know better. such as...
    Exceptional c++, more exceptional c++, exceptional c++ style by herb sutter
    Effective c++, more effective c++,effective STL by scott meyers

    Increase your stl knowledge with:-
    The c++ standard library a tutorial and reference by Nicolai Josuttis.
    c++ report articles by Matt Austern (available online if you look).

    Then move into more advanced topics....
    Modern c++ design by Andrei Alexandrescu.
    Templates a complete guide by Daveed Vandervoorde and Nicolai Josuttis.
    The c++ programming language by Bjarne Stroustrup.

    Move onto windows programming :-
    Programming windows by charles Petzold (5th edition best but is missing info on common controls that was in 4th edition)
    Programming applications for microsoft windows by jeff richter. This one goes into processes, threads, dlls, dll injection, api hooking etc.
    www.winprog.org
    www.relisoft.com

    For opengl:-
    the red book :- http://www.opengl.org/documentation/red_book_1.0/
    the blue book :- http://www.opengl.org/documentation/blue_book_1.0/
    http://nehe.gamedev.net
    http://www.opengl.org

    for directx:-
    advanced 3d game programming with directx9 by walsh and perez. This is a fair introduction to directx9. Its not that advanced.
    Inside directx by bargen. This one is dated now but still contains useful info especially on the non-graphical side of directx.
    the directx9 sdk.
    http://www.flipcode.com
    http://www.gamedev.net
    http://msdn.microsoft.com/directx/
    http://www.codeproject.com/directx/

    I am still waiting to see a really good book on directx especially direct3d 9. Any suggestions?
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  7. #22
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    > Use certain books often called style guides to learn to use what you know better. such as...

    C++ Coding Standards by Sutter and Alexandrescu is a compilation of those you recommended, and is a great place to start. It contains quick and easy guidelines with short explanations, as well as references to many of these other recommended C++ books, so that you can go more in depth on those subjects that interest or confuse you.

  8. #23
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    For the moment from the books you proposed, I've got " exceptional C++" and effective C++. So i'll try to learn these before going into advanced topics.
    And as for directx,openGL and all the APIs... i'll atack those subjects after knowing how to program at a good level in C++

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