namespace std

This is a discussion on namespace std within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; If you want MFC you will have to get a compiler from microsoft....

  1. #16
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    If you want MFC you will have to get a compiler from microsoft.
    STL Util a small headers-only library with various utility functions. Mainly for fun but feedback is welcome.

  2. #17
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    Aren't MFCs VERY good for programming? Or is it better if I do it myself and learn the functions of it?

  3. #18
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    That is not something I know, I havent messed much with Win32 API nor with MFC.
    STL Util a small headers-only library with various utility functions. Mainly for fun but feedback is welcome.

  4. #19
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    Code:
    #include <iostream>
    
    using namespace std;
    
    int main (int argc, char *argv[])
    {
      cout << "Hello World!" << endl;
      cout << "Press ENTER to continue..." << endl; 
      cin.get();
      return 0;
    }
    Jesus no wonder I was so confused. Is this standard notation? What's with the " (int argc, char *argv[])"?

  5. #20
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    yah, its standard. that argc and argv is used for commandline parameters, check the faq or search for more info.
    STL Util a small headers-only library with various utility functions. Mainly for fun but feedback is welcome.

  6. #21
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    I liked it better the other way lol. It was way easier.

  7. #22
    Frequently Quite Prolix dwks's Avatar
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    The "(int argc, char *argv[])" is for receiving arguments from the command line. So if you execute your program like this
    Code:
    C:\>program
    Those variables are
    Code:
    argc: 1
    argv: "program"
          NULL
    Whereas if you execute your program like this
    Code:
    C:\>program arg1 arg2 hippo
    The variables are
    Code:
    argc: 4
    argv: "program"
          "arg1"
          "arg2"
          "hippo"
          NULL
    It's useful for options and stuff.
    dwk

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  8. #23
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    There is no need for the parameters to main if you do not make use of them. Both of the following are standard (and nothing else is):
    Code:
    int main( ) { ... }
    int main(int argc, char* argv[]) { ... }
    The word rap as it applies to music is the result of a peculiar phonological rule which has stripped the word of its initial voiceless velar stop.

  9. #24
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    I'm wondering why use that code if you can do this:

    Code:
    #include <iostream>
    using namespace std
    
    int main() {
             cout << "This is much easier and produces the same results" << endl;
    }

  10. #25
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    <iostream.h> was never part of the C++ standard. It is not deprecated. It doesn't even work at all on modern compilers (including Microsoft's most recent versions). It works on VC++ 6 because that version was created at the same time as the standard and because legacy code from before the standard had to be supported. The standard header (<iostream>) works on VC++ 6 also, so there is no reason to use the old, non-standard header.

    The two forms of main specified by Zach L. are standard. There can be other forms, but they all must specify int as the return value. Again, VC++ 6 is just one compiler that happens to allow void main. Other more standards compliant compilers will not allow it. Why not use the one that works almost anywhere.

    Even though main must specify int as its return value, there is a special case for the main function that says that if you don't return a value, then 0 will be returned automatically. VC++ 6 gives a warning if you don't return something, but modern compilers allow
    Code:
    int main() { }
    as a legal program.

    VC++ is a good IDE, but I believe Dev-C++ and the Beta VC++ 2005 are both free and one of them is probably better given that they use much more standards-compliant compilers. If you have money, there are several compilers, including VC++ 7.1 (2003) that are better than version 6.

    The namespace was introduced to avoid naming conflicts. For small beginner programs the using namespace std; is fine. However, that basically nullifies the entire reason behind the feature that was created for the language. Read up on namespaces to find out why they are useful, and then decide if you want to take advantage of their benefits or if using the easy way is enough for you.
    Last edited by Daved; 07-23-2005 at 10:11 PM.

  11. #26
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    Okay just a checkup. It allows for two variables to have the same name. Example:

    Code:
    namespace int foo 
    int foo //another variable, same name
    Have I got it right? Maybe?

  12. #27
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    Yes, that's the idea, although that isn't C++ syntax.
    Code:
    #include <iostream>
    #include <string>
    
    namespace foo { const int count = 100; }
    namespace bar { const std::string count = "Dracula"; }
    
    int main() { std::cout << foo::count << " " << bar::count << std::endl; }

  13. #28
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    My first post on this forum, and it wasnt even a question lol. Thanks you answered my question before i could answer it.

    Thanks

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