question about Microsoft C++ 6

This is a discussion on question about Microsoft C++ 6 within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; ok I am still new with c++ and the whole interface and code and everything, but i just created 1 ...

  1. #1
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    question about Microsoft C++ 6

    ok I am still new with c++ and the whole interface and code and everything, but i just created 1 base class with 3 derived classes and 1 .cpp source file and everything is coded and i compiled all 4 cpp files and all came up with no errors, my question is if i coded it right i could start coding the main, and depending if i put the right code in it "technically" work fine? I think i asked this in the right way...

    Hobbes

  2. #2
    Registered User major_small's Avatar
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    erm, if I understand correctly, you're basically asking: "if I coded it right, will it work"

    the answer is "yes" to that... but I doubt that's what you were trying to get at...
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  3. #3
    Dae
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    When you are working with an IDE ("interface and code and everything") your .cpp files go in your Project list (they are not #include'd into the main), and then the class declaration goes in a .h which is #include'd into the files requiring that class (like derived requiring base).

    Code:
    ////////main.cpp
    #include "main.h"
    
    BaseClass::BaseClass() //constructor to class from main.h
    {
    }
    
    int main ()
    {
    }
    
    ////////main.h
    class BaseClass
    {
    public:
      BaseClass(); //constructor declared here, defined in main.cpp
    };
    
    ////////derived1.cpp
    #include "main.h"
    
    class Derived1 : public BaseClass /*you could put this part in its own .h too, and include it into this .cpp file*/
    {
    public:
      Derived1(); //constructor
    
    };
    
    Derived1::Derived1 ()
    {
    }
    And your Project list would be: main.cpp, derived1.cpp, derived2.cpp, etc. If that compiles, then yah the code would be right.
    Warning: Have doubt in anything I post.

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  4. #4
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    ok well what i got is in my workspace: Under source Files - building.cpp, business.cpp, home.cpp, main.cpp, school.cpp, and under Header files: building.h(base class) business.h, home.h, school.h(all derived classes), im just following this book that i bought and that is how the code is in the book, i dunno if this way is good or not, but all cpp file compiled with no errors and no warnings, i should look for a different book...

  5. #5
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    >in my workspace: Under source Files - building.cpp, business.cpp, home.cpp, main.cpp, school.cpp, and under Header files: building.h(base class) business.h, home.h, school.h(all derived classes),

    Sounds reasonable so far. Now use main.cpp to act as a driver program to see if the functionality of the other classes is intact. To do that add lines like:
    Code:
    #include <iostream>
    #include "building.h"
    #include "business.h"
    #include "home.h"
    #include "school.h"
    
    int main()
    {
       building building1;
       business business1;
       home home1;
       school school1;
       
       building1.display();
       business1.display();
       home1.display();
       school1.display();
    }
    This assumes that the classes all have some default data that can be displayed calling a public accessor method called display() that is overloaded for each class. My preference, however, is to build the driver program to test each new function I add to each class along the way. That way I only have to debug a few things at a time, hopefully, rather than trying to figure out a multitude of bugs before I can test out functionality in addition to syntax.
    You're only born perfect.

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