Visual Studio.NET help

This is a discussion on Visual Studio.NET help within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; Hey guys - I've been using VS.NET for a while now, to practice my super cool skills...But now I'm making ...

  1. #1
    Code Monkey
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    Visual Studio.NET help

    Hey guys - I've been using VS.NET for a while now, to practice my super cool skills...But now I'm making a project that I wish to distribute (a MUD)...And, well...I've never noticed my programmes weren't making executables (I'd keep on debugging it till it worked, and left em at that)....

    In test, I send over a windows programme I made (A bare bones Window) to see if one of my mates can open it....And he says he gets hit with a warning saying "mscoree.dll" is missing or something.

    This is really sucky...And I can't use Dev-C++, cos their project management/organisation system confuses the hell out of me.

    Also note, that any .exe is in the debug folder, and no where else...So do I have to save the project compilation somewhere else or something?

    Any speedy help and/or advice would really kick arse.

    - Twigstar

  2. #2
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    Im not sure, but it could have to do with .NET framework,
    if your mate doesnt have the .NET framework installed
    (its a free windows update) then it could be
    the reason for the error he recieves.

  3. #3
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    Alright then, thanks mate...Although seems odd that making a stand-alone .exe requires the end user to download the .net framework....

    I'm pretty new to the .NET enviroment - so I'm not too clear whats going on...A simple trip to the MSDN wonderland and google blasts should help me out no doubt...

    Thanks again

    - Twigstar

  4. #4
    the hat of redundancy hat nvoigt's Avatar
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    This indeed is the errormessage of a missing .NET Framework.

    When you created your project, you selected a project type. If you use Managed C++, this means you need the .NET Framework. If you built an MFC application, you need to deploy the MFC on your target platform ( easiest way: link statically ). Only a bare bones Win32 Program will be able to run with only the executable. Check your settings for Managed Extensions. You probably don't need them.
    hth
    -nv

    She was so Blonde, she spent 20 minutes looking at the orange juice can because it said "Concentrate."

    When in doubt, read the FAQ.
    Then ask a smart question.

  5. #5
    Supermassive black hole cboard_member's Avatar
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    This is why I avoid the .NET framework. Apart from being slow and generally just another of 'Microsoft's brilliant ideas', it's not generalised enough to warrant development in my opinion. Not everyone has the .NET framework, and while it is a free windows update, it's still a pain in the padded arse.

    I'm several 'generations' behind, using MSVC 6 SP6. I noticed it's pretty sought after especially amongst more focused diciplines such as game engine writing etc where .NET obviously will not suffice.

    Microsoft suck.
    Period.
    Good class architecture is not like a Swiss Army Knife; it should be more like a well balanced throwing knife.

    - Mike McShaffry

  6. #6
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    Hmmm, this indeed is an annoyance - all my projects are always 'empty projects'...Maybe '.NET hacks' and other .net related books could help me.

    What other IDE do you suggest ahluka? I really love Visual Studios interface (Which is odd...Cos usually the interface from any Microsoft in-house software is usually lame.). I also like it's organisation (Making it friendly on the eyes for all your multiple files - and also has that 'quick reference' thing going on - it shows you what methods and members you made in the class, etc).


    But this is a real bastard....If there's an IDE of equal greatness, I would love to know. (The only IDEs I'm aware of are Eclipse, Bloodshed, VS.NET, and Borlands. (I've never tried Borlands or Eclipse though)).

    Ok thanks for the replies guys.

  7. #7
    Supermassive black hole cboard_member's Avatar
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    I've always thought development software was something Microsoft was actually good at.

    There's Anjuta - which I haven't used but have heard of. It's for Linux/UNIX and I believe for GNOME desktop environments.

    KDevelop is a reasonabe IDE for Linux / UNIX under the KDE desktop environment. Heres a comparison between KDevelop and MSVC:

    http://programming.newsforge.com/art...57202&from=rss

    I love the VS IDE too; KDevelop was loosly designed around it from what I've used of it.
    Last edited by cboard_member; 07-11-2005 at 01:10 PM.
    Good class architecture is not like a Swiss Army Knife; it should be more like a well balanced throwing knife.

    - Mike McShaffry

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    If you go to the Project Properties and look at Configuration Properties->General, there is a setting called Use Managed Extensions. If you select Empty Project this is turned on by default. Turn it off if you aren't using managed C++ (it sounds like you're not). Then you won't need the .NET framework.

    In the future, instead of selecting Empty Project under .NET Projects, choose Win32 Console Project under Win32 and then check the Empty Project option under the Application Settings tab of the wizard.
    Last edited by Daved; 07-11-2005 at 01:15 PM.

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    Yeah, but I've always found free software that is a lot better looking than Microsofts software (Less features as well...But it's like a VCR - No-one ever uses all those bloody features). But otherwise, I love the .NET enviroment, and I will do as advised and knock of the Manged C++ option.

    And thank you for that list ahluka - I will be getting a PC with Linux on it by the end of the month - and anything composing any similarities to the .NET IDE will be great! Thanks alot.

    Just out of curiosity - what is 'managed C++' in the enviroment? (I know a google would answer me - but not in a direct manner.).

    I've heard of it before, and it's probably slipped from memory...Is it just extra options the .NET framework uses/a style/etc...Why is it useful? (etc to the general questions).
    Last edited by Twigstar; 07-11-2005 at 01:53 PM.

  10. #10
    Supermassive black hole cboard_member's Avatar
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    Well I don't know EXACTLY what it is, but all I can tell you is it generally slows down your programs execution times (only a little, but hey) but I guess it's useful. Any mischievious programs go out of the window though (but who writes them?).

    No problem about the links
    Good class architecture is not like a Swiss Army Knife; it should be more like a well balanced throwing knife.

    - Mike McShaffry

  11. #11
    Hello World!
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    I use an IDE called CodeBlocks with the free Microsoft Visual C++ Toolkit. It works great because both softwares are free and it uses the same compiler included with Microsoft Visual Studio .Net 2003.

  12. #12
    the hat of redundancy hat nvoigt's Avatar
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    Just out of curiosity - what is 'managed C++' in the enviroment? (I know a google would answer me - but not in a direct manner.).
    Managed C++ means you can use the .NET Framework. It also means your program will crash without the framework. So if you don't use the framework, disable this option and all your problems are solved.

    Speaking of problems, each tool and language is used to solve problems. A view of "M$ sucks" will not get you anywhere if the guy next desk solved the problem using Microsoft Tools.

    Microsoft Studio .NET has nothing to do with the .NET Framework by the way. You don't have to use the .NET part. The pure C++ IDE is way better than VC6 in ANY aspect.
    hth
    -nv

    She was so Blonde, she spent 20 minutes looking at the orange juice can because it said "Concentrate."

    When in doubt, read the FAQ.
    Then ask a smart question.

  13. #13
    Supermassive black hole cboard_member's Avatar
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    Speaking of problems, each tool and language is used to solve problems
    Yes and each tool and language is used to solve different problems. There has never been, still isn't and probably never will be a tool or langauge that can solve every problem.

    Microsoft Studio .NET has nothing to do with the .NET Framework by the way. You don't have to use the .NET part. The pure C++ IDE is way better than VC6 in ANY aspect.
    I think you'll find it does have something to do with the .NET Framework as it's MS' primary development tool for the said framework. I do realise you have the option of not using .NET, and I think saying that their C++ .NET IDE is better than VC++ 6 in 'ANY aspect' is wrong. Everyone has different preferences, mine happen to lie with VC6, thank you for asking
    Good class architecture is not like a Swiss Army Knife; it should be more like a well balanced throwing knife.

    - Mike McShaffry

  14. #14
    the hat of redundancy hat nvoigt's Avatar
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    I'm several 'generations' behind, using MSVC 6 SP6. I noticed it's pretty sought after especially amongst more focused diciplines such as game engine writing etc where .NET obviously will not suffice.
    I think you should try VS.NET. You will see that VS.NET can be used to produce .NET code. It can also be used to create normal C++ code with or without MFC. VS6 isn't sought after, the ability useful to game engine writers is writing good and performant code, preferably in C++ for critical parts is. You can use a slightly older, inferior tool like VC6, or you can use a slightly better, advanced version like VS.NET. And again, this has nothing to do with the .NET Framework if all you need is unmanaged C++.

    I can see that spending money on a new tool when the old tool is still working is not worth it. But if you can afford it, you should try it, it's waaaaaay more productive than VC6.

    Well I don't know EXACTLY what it is, but all I can tell you is it generally slows down your programs execution times (only a little, but hey) but I guess it's useful.
    I just think that before you declare that MS sucks, you should at least know what it is that they suck at doing.
    hth
    -nv

    She was so Blonde, she spent 20 minutes looking at the orange juice can because it said "Concentrate."

    When in doubt, read the FAQ.
    Then ask a smart question.

  15. #15
    Supermassive black hole cboard_member's Avatar
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    They suck at everything. They can't respond to problems in their OS' more efficiently than open source software developers, as they claim. They program like script kiddies - have you ever seen any of their source code? Open up a header and look, it's disgusting.

    I think you should try VS.NET. You will see that VS.NET can be used to produce .NET code.
    So you really think I'd go out of my way to buy VS.NET Enterprise Architect and not realise it can be used to produce .NET code? Tutt tutt, young grasshoppa' .

    I don't need to be lectured by a lesser programmer, I know what the software I use does, and how well (or not in the case) it does what it's meant to do.

    I've noticed that no-one - least of all you - has realised that these are my opinions? I'm allowed to voice them however I feel - you'd try damn hard to stop me.

    In Microsoft's view, the way forward is to produce software for a non-generalised framework that has yet to stand up to 'old' methods. This is why I stick to VC6, which is by no means inferior. If it does what I require and does it well, then it's sure as hell good enough for me.
    Good class architecture is not like a Swiss Army Knife; it should be more like a well balanced throwing knife.

    - Mike McShaffry

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