basic Mathmatics and Algebraic concepts

This is a discussion on basic Mathmatics and Algebraic concepts within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; hello, this is my first post so i'll say something about me first. i've been trying to get into programming ...

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    basic Mathmatics and Algebraic concepts

    hello, this is my first post so i'll say something about me first.

    i've been trying to get into programming for the better part of 4 years now, but each time i put the book down with frustration.

    when i was in High School i slept most classes and my understanding of Math is limited, so what i'm looking for is a reccomendation for a good book on math for a programmer, something with lessons i can work through similar to a high school textbook, but aimed towards programming.

    any suggestions would be appreciated

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    vae victus! skorman00's Avatar
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    By "aimed towards programming" do you mean books with sample code for certain problems? Most of the programming books that do this are tagged with "for Game Programming" or "for 3D graphics" (not to say that's a bad thing). There really isn't a set of math geared towards programming, since we will use whatever math we need to get the job done.

    maybe this place will help you? http://www.mathprog.org/

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    Toaster Zach L.'s Avatar
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    It sounds like a good book in number theory and/or combinatorics would be of use to you. What book you go for depends on how technical you want it. Off the top of my head, Number Theory by George Andrews comes to mind. It starts off being quite managable, but if you don't really work at it, the last sections will be difficult.
    The word rap as it applies to music is the result of a peculiar phonological rule which has stripped the word of its initial voiceless velar stop.

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    when i was in High School i slept most classes and my understanding of Math is limited
    Education is correlated with income level. It sounds like you can slot yourself in about the $20k - 30k range...maybe a salesman or a construction worker. You've already closed many doors in your life and as a result the potential for what you can achieve is diminishing. You won't get into the best colleges, which means you won't have access to the best jobs. Programming's not for everyone, and it seems like you've given it a go already and it didn't work out. Besides it takes a a sharp, inquisitive mathematical mind to be a good programmer. Look for something else to do....and really apply yourself to it.
    Last edited by 7stud; 05-22-2005 at 01:56 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 7stud
    Education is correlated with income level. It sounds like you can slot yourself in about the $20k - 30k range...maybe a salesman or a construction worker. You've already closed many doors in your life and as a result the potential for what you can achieve is diminishing. You won't get into the best colleges, which means you won't have access to the best jobs. Programming's not for everyone, and it seems like you've given it a go already and it didn't work out. Besides it takes a a sharp, inquisitive mathematical mind to be a good programmer. Look for something else to do....and really apply yourself to it.
    aww, how supportive, and yet elitist that reply was, maybe i wasn't ready to apply my mind then, but i'm willing to make ammends with myself for my past mistakes.

    i asked a simple question and am belittled for it, how very telling.

    anyways, to the the other 2 that tried to help, thanks very much, both the site and the book look to be useful, i'm reading through the site now and plan to pick up the book on monday (if i can get it at chapters, otherwise i'll buy it online)

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    Quote Originally Posted by incubusnb
    aww, how supportive, and yet elitist that reply was, maybe i wasn't ready to apply my mind then, but i'm willing to make ammends with myself for my past mistakes.

    i asked a simple question and am belittled for it, how very telling.

    anyways, to the the other 2 that tried to help, thanks very much, both the site and the book look to be useful, i'm reading through the site now and plan to pick up the book on monday (if i can get it at chapters, otherwise i'll buy it online)
    Yeah you get a lot of that in public discussion board about programming I was in the same boat, I slept through most of HS and didn't really give a ......... One day I woke up, pulled my head out of my ass and went to school, I got into a top notch CS program and will be graduating in August and already have a very well paying job lined up with a large tech company, one that is sometimes lovingly referred to as "the evil empire" To claim that education is correlated with income is somewhat true, though not as strongly as people would like to believe. Intelligence is more strongly correlated with income and believe it or not not all intelligent people go to college. I have met many people in my life who are much smarter than me and probably smarter than most if not all people on this board who never went to college. The idea that college is the only place you can get an education is ridiculous, if you can't teach yourself something then you are not truly intelligent. Just read the books, study hard, know your path will probably be harder than someone that DID pay attention in HS In the end most of those people are just bitter when they realize HS was complete BS as is a large part of college, people that are thirsty for knowledge will find it themselves.



    Mezzano

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    wow...I'm not going to drag out any posting "war" or anything...I was wanted to simply say that I found 7stud's post not only insulting and unrelated to what incubus was looking for (aka knowledge about programming) but it presents these boards in a negative light. He's a first poster and hopefully will post many more times and will develop as a programmer...however, with a useless, insulting post like 7stud's, he may decide that the people who post here arent helpful (which they are...coming from someone who has benefitted from their knowledge time and time again) and more over take an elitist "I'm a programmer and you wish you could be" point of view (which is definitely not the case at all, just about all of us are here to benefit from each other and spread the good word of programming). SO enough of my ranting, incubus, I just wanna say that I'm really glad you're going to actively pursue programming again and as a semi-beginner leaning towards intermediate (in my opinion :-P), feel free to message me about good books or anything along those lines (it can be really difficult to pinpoint a good book/resource for particular info you're seeking without a good nudge in the right direction)...after all, what the hell good are these boards if we dont help one another. Yowzas! -Chap

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    i've been on enough message boards that i've learned that one poster doesn't represent an entire forum, i'll definately be considering this place as my first stop for questions and hopefully in the future i can contribute to answers as well, the impression i get from lurking is that poster like 7stud seem to be in the minority.

    thanks again, i'm already making some headway

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    Toaster Zach L.'s Avatar
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    I think you caught 7stud on a bad day.

    The basic point he made is valid (though a bit too strong). His verbage is perhaps a bit harsh, as you all have pointed out. Certainly, a formal education is not all there is to it, but it certainly helps, and by not applying yourself early on, you are making things much more difficult later on. However, with a lot of hard work, you can bring yourself up to speed, and prove yourself. And, how much harder you have to work depends on how far behind the curve you are.

    If you are really willing to commit yourself to learning everything it takes to be good (and you want to program professionally), and you think you can pull it off, it may be worth it. If you don't want to commit yourself that much, then it isn't. But... the decision is up to you.

    If I understood 7stud correctly, I believe that is what he was basically getting at, and if so, I agree with him.

    Cheers
    The word rap as it applies to music is the result of a peculiar phonological rule which has stripped the word of its initial voiceless velar stop.

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