objects

This is a discussion on objects within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; the <> brackets are used after the type name when declaring an object of a class in STL because the ...

  1. #16
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    the <> brackets are used after the type name when declaring an object of a class in STL because the container classes in STL are all templated classes. If you want your Hash class to act like the STL classes then look into how to make it a templated class.
    You're only born perfect.

  2. #17
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    Those are templates, I don't know if you can override that operator.
    If any part of my post is incorrect, please correct me.

    This post is not guarantied to be correct, and is not to be taken as a matter of fact, but of opinion or a guess, unless otherwise noted.

  3. #18
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    the <> brackets...I don't know if you can override that operator.
    It's not an operator.

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by 7stud
    It's not an operator.
    Sorry, thanks for the correction.
    If any part of my post is incorrect, please correct me.

    This post is not guarantied to be correct, and is not to be taken as a matter of fact, but of opinion or a guess, unless otherwise noted.

  5. #20
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    ok this is kind of getting over my head but to make it so you can declare
    Code:
    Hash <int> myHash; //is this correct syntax? something like this, anyway
    you have to use templates, which are classes that can work with any variable types. that is not overloading. search google, or there is a template tutorial on cprogramming.com

  6. #21
    Confused Magos's Avatar
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    I think you mean defining your own operators:
    Code:
    class Complex
    {
      public:
        Complex
        {
          Re = 0.0;
          Im = 0.0;
        }
    
        const Complex& operator =(double NewRe)
        {
          Re = NewRe;
          Im = 0.0;
    
          return *this;
        }
    
      private:
        double Re;
        double Im;
    }
    The code makes it possible to type:
    Code:
    Complex c;
    c = 3.14;
    instead of:
    Code:
    Complex c;
    c.Re = 3.14;
    c.Im = 0.0;
    MagosX.com

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