deep into C/C++

This is a discussion on deep into C/C++ within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; I know all the basic stuff of C++... But how can I actually use C/C++ to make programs which can ...

  1. #1
    Politics&Cpp geek Da-Nuka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    104

    deep into C/C++

    I know all the basic stuff of C++...
    But how can I actually use C/C++ to make programs which can be more than calculators on a windows-console?

    For example, the FDISK program...I know its made with C,
    but how and where can I learn to program USEFULL things in C/C++? On that low height?

  2. #2
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    2,662
    But how can I actually use C/C++ to make programs which can be more than calculators on a windows-console?
    You can't--you've come to landsend. Now, it's time to put away such childish toys and make something of yourself.

  3. #3
    C/C++ homeyg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Louisiana, USA
    Posts
    209
    Learn more of the language.

  4. #4
    Cat without Hat CornedBee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    8,893
    I would disagree with your implication that the only useful things are the low-level stuff.

    Anyway. The trick in low-level stuff is usually direct hardware access. Now, let me say first that modern OSs such as WinNT and Linux don't allow direct hardware access. But they might provide alternative ways of doing low-level stuff in a limited way.

    Example: I believe fdisk for Linux uses the /dev/hdx devices to directly access the hard disk and modify partition information. The WinNT disk management utility might have a kernel-level part that it can communicate with. The DOS fdisk used interrupts and ports directly.

    What way you do it depends in the end on the system you're developing for. System programming is by definition system-specific.
    All the buzzt!
    CornedBee

    "There is not now, nor has there ever been, nor will there ever be, any programming language in which it is the least bit difficult to write bad code."
    - Flon's Law

  5. #5
    fuh
    fuh is offline
    Attack hamster fuh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    176
    It depends on what you're looking to do. There are several libraries out there that you could use for most things, but it's all in what your goal is.

    If you want to get to graphics and other things, you have a few options. You can go with OpenGL or another library or you could just learn Windows programming. Those are hard, so I wouldn't recommend that.

    You could also get some libraries for File I/O, networking, and other things. These can be effective but they can be expensive or slow and difficult to use, but you probably could get a good one.

    This all depends on what you want to do with your programs. Set a goal and find out how to reach it. Keep trying and you'll probably make your goal.

    Hope that helps,
    \/\/
    fuh
    /\/\
    Stupid things pop singers say

    "I get to go to lots of overseas places, like Canada."
    - Britney Spears

    "I love what you've done with the place!"
    -Jessica Simpson upon meeting the Secretary of Interior during tour of the White House

  6. #6
    Politics&Cpp geek Da-Nuka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    104
    You mention, for example, graphic-libaries...
    Well, THEY must have been programmed&coded as well..?

    And how do the FDISK program do the actual formatting&partionationg work? Is it assembler?

  7. #7
    Cat without Hat CornedBee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    8,893
    Graphics libraries have their cores in the operating system and device drivers. Those are usually written in C, with perhaps some assembly mixed in. Like fdisk. I think if you want to do that kind of stuff you should get a big book about computer architecture, both hardware and software.
    All the buzzt!
    CornedBee

    "There is not now, nor has there ever been, nor will there ever be, any programming language in which it is the least bit difficult to write bad code."
    - Flon's Law

Popular pages Recent additions subscribe to a feed

Similar Threads

  1. Deep and Shallow Copying
    By peckitt99 in forum C++ Programming
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 08-18-2007, 09:37 PM
  2. Deep and Shallow Copy
    By peckitt99 in forum C++ Programming
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 05-13-2007, 07:28 AM
  3. In deep copy
    By Belzebuts in forum C Programming
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 02-05-2006, 10:58 AM
  4. How deep can you go wtih c++
    By Da-Nuka in forum C++ Programming
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 01-01-2005, 03:12 AM
  5. Deep Exploration, OpenGL, and 3d models
    By DavidP in forum Game Programming
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 04-06-2003, 01:12 PM

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21