Were to learn.

This is a discussion on Were to learn. within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; Hi could people tell me whats the best way to learn wether it's a good tutorial on the net or ...

  1. #1
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    Were to learn.

    Hi could people tell me whats the best way to learn wether it's a good tutorial on the net or a good book? Any reccomendations on Tutorials on the net and/or a good book?

  2. #2
    Software Developer jverkoey's Avatar
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    books tend to be very detailed, but the internet can be just as easily detailed (and is free) So it's really a matter of preference

  3. #3
    C++ elitesyntax's Avatar
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    I say a good book is the best way to learn i think.
    Compiler Gcc

  4. #4
    Registered User eth0's Avatar
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    My favs:

    Beginners: Sams teach yourself C++ in 21 days (book)
    intermediete: Thining in C++, Bruce Eckel (book & net)
    OO: Object oriented programming in C++, David Parsons (book)
    Open source isn't a matter of life or death......
    .......its much more important than that!!


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    Anyone know a gd tutorial online?

  6. #6
    Code Goddess Prelude's Avatar
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    A good tutorial:
    http://www.robertjacobs.fsnet.co.uk/

    A good book:
    "Accelerated C++", Andrew Koenig and Barbara Moo

    A good newsgroup:
    alt.comp.lang.learn.c-c++

    A good message board:
    http://cboard.cprogramming.com

    Cheers!
    My best code is written with the delete key.

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    OMFG OMFG robert jacobs thats my name omfg omfg omfg thats spooky spooky spooky!!!!!

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    Registered User major_small's Avatar
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    try a little less caffiene as well... it's not good for programming...

    nice little plug there, prelude...
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  9. #9
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    Thumbs up Books

    The tutorials are good for getting you started... and to to help you decide if you really want to learn this stuff, before you start spending money on books.

    After taking a look at some online tutorials, consider that an introductory book like "21 Days" is over 700 pages long. In general, there is more information and detail in a book than at a web site. I'm sure that all of this information exists on the net, but finding it, and knowing what to search for is difficult.

    I second ethO's recommendations for "21 Days" and "Thinking In C++".

    Teach Yourself C++ In 21 Days, by Jesse Liberty - This book is well structured for self-study with questions and exercises at the end of each chapter (day), and answers and solutions in the back. It is well written and easy to understand. WARNING - Opinions vary... some people hate all of the "21 Days" books. Someone said "They are superficial".

    Thinking In C++, by Bruce Eckel - This book gets in-depth on several topics. He assumes that you already know C. Although the book isn't as well-structured for self-study as "21 Days", there are exercises at the end of each chapter. The book comes in two volumes which you can purchase, or download in PDF format free!!! You can download the answers to volume one for $12.00. Last time I looked, there was no solution guide to volume 2.

    Then, there's always the option of taking a class. I've never taken a C++ class, but I've taken classes in a couple of other programing languages. A class can help guide your learning, motivate you, and give you in-person interaction with an instructor and other students.

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    hah, I always feel like a freeloader on this board as I can't answer many questions, but heres one I can input on:

    Teach Yourself C++ In 21 Days, by Jesse Liberty is a nice book for introduction to programming logic and syntax. Its well laid out and indexed, so I found it a great reference while I started learning. It's also fairly popular, so you might be able to find it at your library.

    Unfortunately it starts to get a bit confusing once pointers and classes are introduced, I found the way it taught them really didn't explain what they were useful for and how they should be used.

    Accelerated C++, by Andrew Koenig and Barbara Moo starts teaching how C++ is really used, and gives a great framework for further learning, and a practical introduction to advanced topics likes classes and pointers/iterators.

    To fill in the gaps, I used Brucek Eckel's free books (http://mindview.net/Books), which you can download in html. They make good references, and volume 2 especially contains a lot of practical tips that I couldn't find elsewhere.

    I don't know what your educational situation is, but checking into your local JC wouldn't hurt if they have a CS program. Even if you don't take classes there, the teachers may be able to point you in the direction of good resources.

    EDIT:
    One thing I forgot to mention. If you're ever intimidated or burn out on C++, you could switch to a simpler language like Python (www.python.org). You can learn all about OOP, data structures, and algorithms, and then once you grasp the important concepts come back to C++'s wondeful world of dangling pointers, memory management, and cryptic template error messages. Playing with python got me over several tricky parts in my current data structures class.
    Last edited by AH_Tze; 05-19-2004 at 04:20 PM.

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