c++ or c ?

This is a discussion on c++ or c ? within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; quick question, would this code be considered fully c++ or fully c? I've never learned c, but I believe that ...

  1. #1
    Registered User axon's Avatar
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    c++ or c ?

    quick question, would this code be considered fully c++ or fully c? I've never learned c, but I believe that sscanf (c) is similar to cin (c++), but I'm not sure....

    Code:
    ifstream examplefile(argv[1]); //open a file indicated by the single command
                                       //line argument
        if (! examplefile.is_open())
        { 
           cout << "Error opening file"; exit (1);
        } 
        examplefile.getline (buffer,100);
        sscanf(buffer,"%d", &line);
        cout << line << endl;
        for (i=1; i<=line; i++)
        {
           examplefile.getline (buffer,100);
           sscanf(buffer, "%d, %d", &con1, &con2);
           cout << con1 << "," << con2 << endl;
        }
    thanks, axon

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    fullly C++, yes, because C++ encompasses (almost?) all of C. fully C, no, because C can never uses classes like ifstream or objects like cout.

  3. #3
    Toaster Zach L.'s Avatar
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    Technically full C++ as elad said. Practically, I'd call it a mix of the two, though.
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    Super Moderator VirtualAce's Avatar
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    In reality pure C++ is quite ugly. Most use a mixture of the two which is why we all love this C/C++ world.

  5. #5
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    Originally posted by Bubba
    In reality pure C++ is quite ugly. Most use a mixture of the two which is why we all love this C/C++ world.
    I tend to disagree, I almost never include any of the c header files in any of my programming. Pure C++ can look quite elegant when properly written.

    I don't passionately avoid C, but I tend to use the newer ways to do things.
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    Registered User major_small's Avatar
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    ^ you don't even use C-style strings?
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    Senior Member joshdick's Avatar
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    I usually try to steer clear of C. I like the STL containers and the string class more than C-style strings. I like cout and cin better than scanf and printf. I like new and delete better than malloc and free. I like every improvement over C, so I use those nice features of C++.
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  8. #8
    Registered User major_small's Avatar
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    well, I do have to say I use mostly C++, but that's because I never learned C... some C is helpful, but I don't think I'll go back and learn anytime soon because 1) every book i've read says not to, and 2) I'm going to learn different languages first...
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    C++ Witch laserlight's Avatar
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    Well, one will probably have to use C-style strings somewhere

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    I think of null terminated char arrays, functions, arrays, loops, etc as being essential to both C and C++. The differences in I/O routines, memory management, and underlying mechanisms to model reality delineate what I think of as C vs C++. I tend to think of STL (with the string class, list class, vector class, algorithms, etc) as another non-proprietary layer of complexity wherein standards have been agreed upon so we don't have to each keep inventing our own wheel; whereas MFC, VCL and other libraries are propietary standards that may or may not be routinely available and/or standardized, but still offer prebuilt routines to make our lives easier.

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