Printing my name in reverse

This is a discussion on Printing my name in reverse within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; Could anyone please tell me how I can print my name in reverse? Thanks #pragma argsused int main(int argc, char* ...

  1. #1
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    Printing my name in reverse

    Could anyone please tell me how I can print my name in reverse?

    Thanks

    #pragma argsused
    int main(int argc, char* argv[])

    {
    char myString[] = {"Jason"};
    int i = 0;

    while ( myString[i] != '\0' )
    {
    cout << myString[i] << "";
    i++;
    }
    getch();
    return 0;
    }
    Code:
    /________________________________________________________________

  2. #2
    Its not rocket science vasanth's Avatar
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    Re: Printing my name in reverse

    Originally posted by Guti14
    Could anyone please tell me how I can print my name in reverse?

    Thanks

    #pragma argsused
    int main(int argc, char* argv[])

    {
    char myString[] = {"Jason"};
    int i = 0;

    while ( myString[i] != '\0' )
    {
    cout << myString[i] << "";
    i++;
    }
    getch();
    return 0;
    }
    Code:
    /________________________________________________________________



    how abt

    Code:
    int main(int argc, char* argv[])
    
    {
    char myString[] = {"Jason"};
    int i = 0;
    
    while ( myString[i] != '\0' )
    {
    i++;
    }
    
    for(int j=i-1;j>=0;j--)
    cout<<cout << myString[j] << "";
    
    
    getch();
    return 0;
    }

  3. #3
    Registered User hk_mp5kpdw's Avatar
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    Northern Virginia/Washington DC Metropolitan Area
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    3,802
    Just for some spice...
    Code:
    #include <string>
    #include <iostream>
    #include <algorithm>
    using namespace std;
    
    int main()
    {
        string name("Jason");
        reverse_copy(name.begin(),name.end(),ostream_iterator<char>(cout,""));
        cout << endl;
        return 0;
    }
    Outputs:
    nosaJ

    Mileage may vary as to what additional headers you may need to include (maybe <iterator>?), these worked as is under MSVC++ 6.0.
    "Owners of dogs will have noticed that, if you provide them with food and water and shelter and affection, they will think you are god. Whereas owners of cats are compelled to realize that, if you provide them with food and water and shelter and affection, they draw the conclusion that they are gods."
    -Christopher Hitchens

  4. #4
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    Code:
    #include <iostream>
    #include <string.h>
    using namespace std;
    int main()
    {
        char name[] = "jason";
        int len = strlen(name) - 1;
        while ( len >= 0)
            cout << name[len--];
            
        cout << endl;
        system("PAUSE");
    }

  5. #5
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    #include <string.h>

    should be

    #include <cstring>

  6. #6
    I am the worst best coder Quantrizi's Avatar
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    Originally posted by 7stud
    #include <string.h>

    should be

    #include <cstring>
    In MSVC++ 6.0 (AFAIK), it isn't fully ANSI/C++ complient.

  7. #7
    Registered User
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    Well from what ive been told and from hte new c++ standards, but correct me if im wrong.

    Code:
     
    #include <string.h>
    
    should be
    
    #include <string>
    from what i have heard string is now standard
    C++ Rules!!!!
    ------------
    Microsoft Visual Studio .NET Enterprise

  8. #8
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    I though CString was a mfc thing and not a part of standard c++.

    #include <string> gives access to the string class and make it possible to create a string variable and use it's methods.

    I also thought that when using #include <string.h> you get "access" to the old c-string methods, like strlen.

  9. #9
    C++ Developer XSquared's Avatar
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    To use the c-style string manipulation functions, you include <cstring>. I believe the MFC header is <cstring.h>
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