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typedef/overloaded operators

This is a discussion on typedef/overloaded operators within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; Hi, just felt curious about this one thing (sorta spur of the moment pointless idea). Can you overload the operators ...

  1. #1
    Carnivore ('-'v) Hunter2's Avatar
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    typedef/overloaded operators

    Hi, just felt curious about this one thing (sorta spur of the moment pointless idea). Can you overload the operators for basic data types like int? And if so, if you made a typedef of an int for example and called it "mytype", could you overload an operator for int and also overload the same operator for mytype, differently?
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  2. #2
    Veni Vidi Vice
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    Can you overload the operators for basic data types like int?
    Nope not possible. If overloading basic or primitive datatypes would be possible every programmer could introduce a new basic datatype. Problem: Ambiguous.
    01000111011011110110111101100100 011101000110100001101001011011100110011101110011 01100100011011110110111001110100 01100011011011110110110101100101 01100101011000010111100101110011 0110100101101110 01101100011010010110011001100101
    Good things donīt come easy in life!!!

  3. #3
    Carnivore ('-'v) Hunter2's Avatar
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    Oh right
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  4. #4
    Cat
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    No, and no.

    Operators involving only primitive types are set in stone, and cannot be changed.

    Also, a typedef is not a new type, it's only "shorthand". The true type will always be substituted during compilation.

  5. #5
    Carnivore ('-'v) Hunter2's Avatar
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    Yeah, that was what I thought, but it was a sort of sudden "what if" idea that I felt might be worth exploring since I wasn't 100% sure
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  6. #6
    Just because ygfperson's Avatar
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    Just FYI, enums are technically not the same as ints (even though they're the same internally), so you can overload an enum differently from an int.

  7. #7
    Carnivore ('-'v) Hunter2's Avatar
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    Hmm, so I can have 2 different int "types", with one of them overloadable?...
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  8. #8
    Cat
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    You could make an Integer class or something... why would you WANT to overload the operators of an int, actually?

  9. #9
    Carnivore ('-'v) Hunter2's Avatar
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    Well, no real reason... out of idle curiosity I guess I enjoy coming up with far-out and useless theories that
    #ifdef SOME_CONDITION
    should work
    #else
    usually don't
    #endif
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  10. #10
    Just because ygfperson's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Hunter2
    Well, no real reason... out of idle curiosity I guess I enjoy coming up with far-out and useless theories that
    #ifdef SOME_CONDITION
    should work
    #else
    usually don't
    #endif
    It's all about the types. C++ is very strongly typed. It's designed so that you can use the type system to help you catch errors and debug code. The fact that an enum and an int are fundamentally the same doesn't matter: the type is different.

  11. #11
    Carnivore ('-'v) Hunter2's Avatar
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    Ok, thanks. Lots of useful facts pouring in here
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