Math related Programming Books

This is a discussion on Math related Programming Books within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; Does anyone know of any good Math books that also include some applications in programming. I am interested specificly in ...

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    Math related Programming Books

    Does anyone know of any good Math books that also include some applications in programming. I am interested specificly in probability, triginometry and calculus.

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    Nor
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    are you wanting to do games, encription, sales recoreds
    Try to help all less knowledgeable than yourself, within
    the limits provided by time, complexity and tolerance.
    - Nor

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    I am interested in fuzzy logic, 3D Rendering, and Physics related applications.

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    Do a google search for "Numerical Recipes". Its one of the best books out there, in my opinion. The C and FORTRAN versions are also available free online (C++ version isn't though).
    The word rap as it applies to music is the result of a peculiar phonological rule which has stripped the word of its initial voiceless velar stop.

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    Nor
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    fuzzy logic .. clueless

    3D Rendering .. recomend one of my fav books. 3D terrain programming - trent polack
    it covers most of your more advance stuff for limiting the poloy count geomipmapping, quadtree, roam

    Physics related -Advanced Engineering Mathematics
    by Erwin Kreyszig is a good read but might not be what your looking for
    Try to help all less knowledgeable than yourself, within
    the limits provided by time, complexity and tolerance.
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    Amo ftbol!
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    In computers, things are either 1 or 0. In fuzzy logic, things can be in between, which is more realistic as things are rarely absolutely true or absolutely false.

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    here is one ive had my eye on for a while but havent picked up yet.

    Im a math book...

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    Cat
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    Originally posted by golfinguy4
    In computers, things are either 1 or 0. In fuzzy logic, things can be in between, which is more realistic as things are rarely absolutely true or absolutely false.
    Reasonably accurate, although a little simplistic. In fuzzy logic, just like traditional logic, you define rules. E.g. let's say you had a simple climate control system. You start with three rules:

    * If it's too hot, turn on the AC
    * If it's just right, do nothing
    * If it's too cold, turn on the heat.

    In classical logic, these conditions would me mutually exclusive. E.g. the temperature would be either hot, just right, or cold. For example, say you set the bounds between "just right" and "hot" at 83 F. At 82, you're OK, but at 84 you're air conditioning full blast, and there's a sudden transition.

    In fuzzy logic, your categories still exist, but your temperature can fall into more than one category at once. You might say that 75 degrees is 100% "just right", and 0% "too cold" and "too hot" (so you do nothing), while 83 degrees might be 75% "too hot", 25% "just right" and 0% "too cold" (you'd turn on the AC, but not at full power, because you're still 25% "just right"). In this way, you have smoother transitions from one category to another, and your response is often more ideal.
    Last edited by Cat; 07-08-2003 at 11:20 PM.

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