Best book for C++

This is a discussion on Best book for C++ within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; The best book so far is the one written by H. Shildt, but the more self explainatory is the one ...

  1. #31
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    The best book so far is the one written by H. Shildt,
    but the more self explainatory is the one published by Deitel & Deitel....it has a lot of good examples......if your a begginer don't purchase the book of Bjarne Stroustrup it is more on the syntax of the program.......

  2. #32
    It's full of stars adrianxw's Avatar
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    What Jason D said about the Horton book, (the VC stuff and MFC stuff), is why I never recomend it. To specific.
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  3. #33
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    I found the C++ Primer plus by prata very easy to understand as there are a lot of examples. It covers most of the major topics and also makes a very good reference book later.

    I also used "Teach Yourself C++ for Linux in 21 days" although I cannot remember the author, which surprisingly is not linux specific (apart from the last chapter), all the code is standard C++ (for what I remember) as thats what gcc wants.

    If I were you though I'd just go to the local bookshop & just spend an hour there looking through all the books to find an author you really like and can understand. We can all tell you what styles we like, but we cant tell you what styles you will like.

  4. #34
    jasondoucette.com JasonD's Avatar
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    Originally posted by adrianxw
    What Jason D said about the Horton book, (the VC stuff and MFC stuff), is why I never recomend it. To specific.
    To elaborate, if I haven't enough already: With the exception of 1 chapter that explains a bunch of stuff about Visual C++, and another chapter that gets into windows programming, the first 10 chapters are very good at teaching C++, and there is hardly any mention of the Visual C++ environment, if any. The remainder of the book is completely involved with MFC and Visual C++, and is not recommended. But, I still stand that the first half of the book is the best C++ tutorial/book I have seen yet... and is worth the money for this alone. Pick up a used copy if you do not wish to pay the full price.

  5. #35
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    Originally posted by v@grant
    The best book so far is the one written by H. Shildt,
    but the more self explainatory is the one published by Deitel & Deitel....it has a lot of good examples......
    I got a C++ Interactive Learning CDROM by the Dietel Brothers, but they seem to overwhelm me w/ too much stuff, and it's just in the fisrt few chapters. Wonder what they've got under those more advanced topics...

    The Savitch's book is somewhat better for me I guess. Easier to understand and so far I'm still able to follow all the explanations.
    As a newbie, I'll stick w/ the book...

  6. #36
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    Is Visual C++ for Dummies any good?
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  7. #37
    jasondoucette.com JasonD's Avatar
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    I don't know, but I had a look at "C++ All-in-One Desk Reference For Dummies", and it was horrible... Without a doubt the worst tutorial I have ever seen, and this is no exaggeration.

    One example of many (and this isn't just the worst one - just the first that pops into my head) was its explanation of the return statement in main(). It says, and this is almost word for word (I cannot remember each word exactly, except for the last sentence): "try returning a value other than 0. it don't work" It had absolutely no mention of what the return value is for, its history and why it is still good code to require it, and leaves the reader with the impression that 0 is the only value you can return legally. Again, this is just one example of many. Imagine the difficulties of learning from this book when it is attempting to explain something you've never heard of - like classes.

    If this is any example of other programming books "for dummies", then I will stay as far away from them as possible.

  8. #38
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    howdy,
    I liked C++ Black Book by Holzner, it moved at a good pace for me as a beginner and in the end it touched on some pretty advanced stuff.
    after that OOP in C++ by LaFore was a good OOP book IMHO.

    M.R.
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