trouble with a book

This is a discussion on trouble with a book within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; my sister checked out "c++ for dummies" at the library, but theres a problem. i read the part if who ...

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    trouble with a book

    my sister checked out "c++ for dummies" at the library, but theres a problem. i read the part if who should read this book and it said that if i dont know C then i should quit and buy "c for dummies." i remember reading somewhere that you dont need to know C to learn C++. should i return the book and get one that specifically says that i can learn c++ w/o knowing anything else. thank you.

  2. #2
    Funniest man in this seat minesweeper's Avatar
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    You don't need to know C to learn C++. If the book is written in such a manner that requires you to know C first then I would say it is down right cheeky of them to do that. It's like they are trying to get you to buy the other book as well. Have a read through it, try some examples and see if you come across anything in the early stages of the book that it assumes you know and you don't. If not then don't worry about it. If so then yeah I would suggest taking it back and getting another book, there are plenty out there that will teach you C++ without C as a pre-requisite.

    Sam's Teach Yourself C++ in 21 Days is a good one IMO.

  3. #3
    Skunkmeister Stoned_Coder's Avatar
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    Do not buy either a ....for dummies or a ...in 21 days book. Neither of them will teach you c++ to even an acceptable standard. If you seriously want to learn c++ from a book then get hold of these.....

    firstly Accelerated c++ by andrew koenig and barbara moo.

    secondly the c++ primer by stan lippmann.

    Those two will teach you the majority of the syntax of c++. Something else you will find useful is Thinking in c++ by bruce eckel. This is a 2 volume work that is freely available from his website. Excellent book and a perfect partner to the first two.

    When you have been learning for about 6 months to 1 year then its time to invest in some heavier reading.

    Effective c++,more effective c++ and effective STL all by scott meyers are worth their weight in gold.
    Exceptional c++ and more exceptional c++ by herb sutter.These again are excellent but most of the information in these two is freely available at herbs website.
    The c++ programming language by bjarne stroustrup. This is a book that personally i dont like much but i wouldnt be without it. Dont get me wrong it contains an awful lot of advanced c++ information but is structured poorly and i think poorly written.
    The c++ standard library by nicolai josuttis. This book is only really concerned with the part of c++ that used to be known as STL or the standard template library.It is an awesome reference for stl and also a good tutorial if you are not familiar with it. it is extremely well written and well structured.
    Free the weed!! Class B to class C is not good enough!!
    And the FAQ is here :- http://faq.cprogramming.com/cgi-bin/smartfaq.cgi

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    just out of curiosity, since we're on the topic anyways:

    Is Accelerated C++ more of a reference book or a tutorial type book?

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    Skunkmeister Stoned_Coder's Avatar
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    tutorial.
    Free the weed!! Class B to class C is not good enough!!
    And the FAQ is here :- http://faq.cprogramming.com/cgi-bin/smartfaq.cgi

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    thanks.

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    jasondoucette.com JasonD's Avatar
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    I took a look at the C++ for Dummies, and it was the worst tutorial I have ever seen. It is completely horrible. If you are interested in learning C++, I recommend Beginning Visual C++ 6 by Ivor Horton. It teaches the basics of the C++ language (essentially C, but with a few extras that C++ allows, such as declaration of a variable anywhere you want) over a large number of chapters before even getting into the basics of OOP. Highly recommended.

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    Student Forever! bookworm's Avatar
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    Try out C++ in 24 Hrs by Jesse Liberty,then any book teaching OOP,and then,if u like may be VC++ and even .NET

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    Or if you dont have the money or just to lazy to go out and buy a book use this website that has FREE books online. ENJOY!!

    http://www.maththinking.com/boat/computerbooks.html

    NOTE look under Languages
    C++ Rules!!!!
    ------------
    Microsoft Visual Studio .NET Enterprise

  10. #10
    Skunkmeister Stoned_Coder's Avatar
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    there are some good books there. I noticed particularly the scott meyers effective c++ and more effective c++ and bruce eckels thinking in c++
    Free the weed!! Class B to class C is not good enough!!
    And the FAQ is here :- http://faq.cprogramming.com/cgi-bin/smartfaq.cgi

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    Registered User Machewy's Avatar
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    This is the best book ever!!!!

    Okay,
    I was tricked into buying "c++ for dummies" also. It was a good 20 bucks down the drain.

    So I went back to 'Barnes and Noble' and bought a highly recommend book for beginners that was called ' Beginning C++' by Ivor Horton.
    _It has a total of 952 pages
    _Its made to teach and be understandable to a beginner
    _By the end of it, one should be an excellent c++ programmer and be able to help alot of people(expecially on these forums)
    _It has all the references you need in the back
    _This includes ascii text for most of the bases
    _24hr support
    _online website to download free source code from the book and other stuff
    _It only costs 39.99 or 29.00 off of amazon(shipping adds up)
    _The only draw back is that it doesn't include a cd, but WHO CARES?! It gives you the free everlasting membership to download anything you need.

    This author is phenominal and I think that every C++ programmer should at least take a look at this book.

    Oh Yeah, the only thing I have against with the "Beginning Visual C++ 6", is that it is made to teach you basically windows programming in c++. The "Beginning C++"(by the same author) has it all.
    Last edited by Machewy; 04-20-2003 at 03:31 PM.
    "All things come to an end"

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    thanks to all you responded to my topic. ill try to find some of the books mentioned at the library and eventually get a copy for myself.

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    I'll second the recommendation for "Ivor Horton's Beginning C++". It's a great book, except for one section--skip the overly complex bitwise operator section in chapter 3. Nothing builds on it later, so just skip it and forget about it. That section is not typical of the rest of the book. In the rest of the book, Ivor Horton explains concepts thoroughly with two or three line code snippets before introducing basic program examples. Then, after every program example, he goes through the program, line by line, and explains what it does. At the end of every chapter there are 5 or 6 problems with model answers, which is very rare for a computer book, and I think absolutely necessary if you really want to learn programming.

    A beginner pointed out to me that one problem with "Ivor Horton's Beginning Visual C++" is that sometimes he introduces a slightly more complicated example immediately, rather than a simple example that just demonstrates the concept at hand. After looking over the chapter on arrays, I have to agree with that criticism. I think the problem is that the editors tried to take Ivor Horton's Beginning C++ and condense it into the first 12 chapters of Beginning Visual C++, and some of the easier examples got left out. However, since he explains every program example, line by line, a beginner is never going to get lost and will still be able to follow along, and a beginner can always try some easier examples on their own. An advantage to learning C++ with Beginning Visual C++, is that since the C++ part is a shortened version, a lot of the less important concepts are omitted which allows the beginner to get a quicker overview of C++. Beginning C++ has a lot of information, and it's a great reference, but it takes a long time to work through the book because of its length.

    I started off buying "Sam's Teach Yourself C++ in 21 days" and after a week, I threw it in the trash.
    Last edited by 7stud; 04-20-2003 at 07:56 PM.

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