Stream vs. FILE*

This is a discussion on Stream vs. FILE* within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; What do you guys thing? I, personally, love data streams. They are so customizeable and fun to work with. I ...

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    Registered User Aran's Avatar
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    Stream vs. FILE*

    What do you guys thing?

    I, personally, love data streams. They are so customizeable and fun to work with. I never really had any interest in learning FILE* after i learned streams.

    And anyway, aren't FILE* commands just for backward compatability?

    If we've got iostream.h, why the hell don't we use it?

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    zen
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    Unfortunately if you want smaller faster code, with the majority of libraries streams aren't the way to go.

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    Registered User Aran's Avatar
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    i guess it depends on if you want flexibility, or a little more speed...

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    zen
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    Yeah, depends what you want to do. Although for the virtually any console mode program, I doubt whether a printf() will have any noticeable gains over cout<< so it's whatever your more comfortable with. I think both have their pros and cons.

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    the hat of redundancy hat nvoigt's Avatar
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    For intensive formating, writing to screen or file with printf-style functions seems easier but more powerful.

    In the end, it's personal taste, though.
    hth
    -nv

    She was so Blonde, she spent 20 minutes looking at the orange juice can because it said "Concentrate."

    When in doubt, read the FAQ.
    Then ask a smart question.

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    Linguistic Engineer... doubleanti's Avatar
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    i've never used streams... (to my knowledge...) just printf and fopen and f*whatever functions... and that is a question i've always wondered myself. do you all recommend i bother learning about streams? i seem to do fine without them... thank you
    hasafraggin shizigishin oppashigger...

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    Streams are part of the Standard C++ Library. I've heard that they are not used much, nor is much of the C++ STL because people use vedor libraries instead. But if you do not have the authority 'book' on STL and have not read The C++ Programming Language cover to cover or 'D&E' than how can you claim to know C++? Instead you will just know OOP methodology.
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    , nor is much of the C++ STL because people use vedor libraries instead
    i don't know about that, guy. The only time i don't use the STL is when i'm using MFC. Then i use the MFC libraries. MFC accounts for about 15 percent of my programing...

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    Okay, well that is alright but I've noticed a lot of people making pure language comparisons with the new .NET languages and wonder how much they really depend on the C++ definition. Microsoft has a lot of great C++ string handling and graphics libraries, etc. At some point, how are these abstractions different than migrating to a managed language? How honest will people be when they compare languages. I've never seen anyone site the strength of the CString object yet it is probably used a lot in real programs. I think that vendor libraries should not be overlooked, yet I also think that a C++ programmer should learn the entire definition.
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