ImTotallyLOST!

This is a discussion on ImTotallyLOST! within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; I want to be a game designer.Im 14 but I dont know were to start.I decided to try to learn ...

  1. #1
    NewBoy
    Guest

    Smile ImTotallyLOST!

    I want to be a game designer.Im 14 but I dont know were to start.I decided to try to learn C++ since most games use that.I downloaded Borland Free Comand Line Tools and I enrolled in Project Fun(its an internet tutorial that teaches you how to make games).It teaches me things like to do sprites,add text,particles,ect.ect.ext and when I have to put an object function,(like when I press up on the keyboard for the sprite to move up) it tells me the code but doesent tech me how to make codes.

    So I came to this website to try to learn but when I open the C:/Borland/BCC55/Bin and double click on bcc32 it just flashes and closes the screen.I dont know what to do=(

    So can anyone help me?

    Is this site good whit learning C++?

    So what should I do If I want to learn C++?

  2. #2
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Posts
    142
    you should go to a game development forums/site if you are an aspiring game developer,

    try www.flipcode.com and www.gamedev.net

  3. #3
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    11

    gah!

    i went to game dev, found the part where it says what to get to make them nifty little graphics... and found out of the two reccomended, one is DOS (DJGPP or some such name) and looks like a pain to set up, and the other costs me 100 bucks. what else can i get?
    I'm not here. This isn't happening

  4. #4
    Skunkmeister Stoned_Coder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    2,572
    forget games with graphics and sound until you have learnt the language and are comfortable using it to write a variety of console apps. Would you fly a plane without having taken flying lessons?
    Free the weed!! Class B to class C is not good enough!!
    And the FAQ is here :- http://faq.cprogramming.com/cgi-bin/smartfaq.cgi

  5. #5
    NewBoy
    Guest
    But were do I learn the language?I tried here but I dont know were to write the code that they give me to practice.

    Like the first lesson you have to write the code(hallo world something)but I dont know were to write it.I downloaded Borland Free Command Line and I use that whit the Game Designing software that I downloaded from the site were I learning how to design games but I dont know hot to do it sepretly.

    How do I open the Borland thing?(I put it on the C drive)

  6. #6
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    32
    Couple things, first get a good book (my suggestion is O'Reillys Practical C++ Programming)...even if you don't have the money, save up a bit or see if your parents would be willing to buy you the book. Secondly, you can write C++ code with just using notepad, all source code is is text nothing fancy. You do need a C++ compiler (Borland in your case) to compile your program.

    With using the Borland compiler, can't help you there, I use Microsoft Visual C++ 6 and if I ever feel like it gcc on linux.

    If there just ain't no way in the world that you'll be able to get the book, then you're going to have to go by what you can find on the net. From what I've seen on this website so far, it's a pretty good start. Check out the FAQ on the site, it covers quite a bit.

  7. #7
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    11
    Originally posted by Stoned_Coder
    forget games with graphics and sound until you have learnt the language and are comfortable using it to write a variety of console apps. Would you fly a plane without having taken flying lessons?
    meh. ive driven without taking driving lessons... and i am comfortable with C++. i can write you a program that gives you change, and can use strings, arrays, if/else, and more.

    and i like learning as i go, its easier for me.

    now that i think about it that was directed PROBABLY not at me
    I'm not here. This isn't happening

  8. #8
    Registered User Gnoober's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    40
    I have a book called "Game Programming all in one". First it teaches the basics of C++ and allows you to make console games. When you're completely comfortable with the entire language, it goes on to windows programming and at the very end, you create a breakout clone. There are some problems though. First, the code is written for MSVC++. Plus, some of the example programs on the cd do not work. It could be because I run XP but who knows. What outrages me is that the final breakout clone program does not work. But it does help if you want to learn to program games because it covers pretty much everything.
    - Grady (:

  9. #9
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    1,595
    to do it on the cheap I would download latest version of BloodshedDev Integrated Development Environment---free and easier to use (IMO) than Borlands free compiler.

    I would then read the tutorial on this site, follow that with the online version of Teach Yourself C++ in 21 days and then Thinking in C++, also free on line.

  10. #10
    BMJ
    BMJ is offline
    Banal internet user BMJ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Chicagoland
    Posts
    1,380
    IMO: Your order of operation should be
    • Learn basic C++ syntax
    • Discover the OO paradigm
    • Master C++ syntax
    • Begin implementing data structures in order to understand them (stacks, linked lists, trees, etc...)
    • Incorporate your knowledge of OOP, data structures, and program flow into an an API such as Windows
    • Choose your destiny

  11. #11
    Hardware Engineer
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Posts
    1,398
    Getting a complier set-up and working can be tricky. I've used 3 or 4 different obscure or old ones, and I don't think any of them did what I expected on the first try. (The problems I've had usually had to do with having the DOS paths set-up properly, saving my source file in the right place etc. So, DON'T GIVE-UP if "Hello World" doesn't compile the first time. Lot's of programs here at work that I have to occasionally update are written in Quick-C. They have dozens of files. Usually, the biggest hurdle is getting the thing to re-compile as-is before I make any changes.

    1. EDIT - Most compilers come with an editor, so you click File/New to start writing your program. This is called your SOURCE code. If you use Notepad, save your file with a dot-c file name (MyProg.c). If you use a word processor, you have to save the file as "plain text" or ASCII. (Word processors normally save a lot of formatting information along with your text. This junk will totally confuse the compiler.)

    2. COMPILE - Run the compiler. This might be called "Compile", "Build", "Make", or sometimes its done from the DOS command line "cl MyProg.c" The compiler will link and compile creating an EXECUTABLE (MyProg.exe).

  12. #12
    NewBoy
    Guest
    Oh,so what you are saying is that I have to write the code in notepad,wordpad,ect.But I have to open what I wrote in wordpad whit the Borland Compiler?

    But how do I do this?

  13. #13
    Registered User scuba22's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    35
    Buy Deitel & Deitel 'C++ How to program ' Fourth Ed.(about 100$).
    (less than a good pair of Nikes)...
    It COMES with the Visual C++ 6.0 compiler-
    It also comes with instructions on how to USE the compiler.

    Dude, you've got the right enthusiasm...now do it the right way..
    you'll be a Gaming Zillionaire by 20!
    (ell, maybe not...but....)
    scuba22

  14. #14
    Hardware Engineer
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Posts
    1,398

    "Point" to compiler to your source...

    I don't use the Broland compiler. But, sombody here can tell you how to invoke it. I wouldn't say you have to "open" the file in the compiler, I'd say you have to "point" the compiler to your source file.

    If you're using an editor that comes with a compiler (Or IDE = Integrated Development Environment) you usually have to save the source file first. So, it doesn't have to be "open" to compile.

    The last time I tried-out the free Borland compiler, you had to compile from the DOS command line. Something like "bc MyFile.c"

    The documentation with the compiler, or the Broland web site should tell you how to compile. If you can't figure- it out. Sombody here can help!

  15. #15
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    1
    Yeah, i too just started looking up C++ programming last night, and damn am i confused. I downloaded the Bloodshed DEV compiler, and i'm having quite a few problems myself. I've tried a few of the sample programs listed in the beginning of the tutuorial, and none of them work. Here's an example of one that i cant get to work:#include <iostream.h>

    int main()

    (

    int age;

    cout<<"Please input your age: ";

    cin>>age;

    if(age<100)

    (

    cout<<"You are pretty young!";

    )

    else if(age==100)

    (

    cout<<"You are old";

    )

    else

    (

    cout<<"Are you really that old?";

    )

    return 0;

    )




    I entered the text then compiled and ran the program. The program opened and asked me for my age, i typed in 15 and hit enter, then the program just closed. How do i get the program to not close. I saw somewhere on this site that said typing in cin.get(); right before the return 0; would cause it to stay open, but so far it doesn't work. I really want to learn C++ programming but this isn't really helping.

    P.S. I'm poor, so i cant go out and spend $100 on a book or anything, lol.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Popular pages Recent additions subscribe to a feed

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21