What can I do?

This is a discussion on What can I do? within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; SKIPPER P.S. Other Unregistered's analogy/comparison to Black individuals during the Second World War is invalid. (Sorry, Uraldor.) Those individuals weren't ...

  1. #16
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    SKIPPER
    P.S. Other Unregistered's analogy/comparison to Black individuals during the Second World War is invalid. (Sorry, Uraldor.)

    Those individuals weren't given the opportunity, initially. Their "aptitude" was pre-judged.
    White people.... what can I say...
    (i am not white/black by the way.. and not a rascist either.. just pointing out what has happened in the past... when people talked
    about aptitude..)

    Prejudged or not prejudged... this aptitude thing will only
    make people afraid that they're not potent enough to
    do the task.

    If one works hard, one doesn't need aptitude!
    Bang!

  2. #17
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    Watch the Matrix, look at some C++ code before you go to sleep, then it will scroll across your mind in your dreams. When you wake up, all will be revealed.
    At least, that is how I plan for big projects
    "Um...well..."
    -Kyoto Oshiro

  3. #18
    Jeex
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    Uraldor's Rant

    Thanks for listening to my rant
    Rant it really was!!

    Your comments about the black pilots are valid, but i can't see how this relates to the current discussion. The comment about aptitude was referring to 'some people', not to a particular group of people. It was a general statement that meant that any person, male, female, black, white, yellow, young, old, etc MAY NOT have the aptitude for it. It was extremely general and not focussed on any one group of people, which means that the statement is indeed valid and has nothing to do with what other people have said.
    He wasn't talking about Racism in particular.
    The guy was trying to say how easily one can get fooled when
    one talks about "aptitude"

    Hardwork is a mightier way.

  4. #19
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    I was the student who asked for help in this thread. Thanks to all of you who had taken the time and effort to write. I’ll try my best to follow the advice offered here. I know that there is no shortcut to become a good programmer (just like everything else in life).

    In response to Skipper’s questions and comments:

    1.Yes, I am a Computer Science major, not Engineering. So it does really make a difference to me whether I get C++ or not. I am not looking for some “help me feel good” advice. I seriously think that I have not done the right things when it comes to C++, so I came here hunting for practical advice to nudge me in the right directions. I’m willing to work hard if that was all it takes. Life as we know follows a different equation.

    2.I am not concerned about jeopardizing my GPA. Last thing on my mind if you asked me. I brought the GPA up because I did not want anyone to think I was just another lazy student looking for the “magic bullet” (minus the hardwork and effort) to boost my grade in a 16 week course. This is my second bachelor’s degree. I quit my job and went back to school because I find Computer Science interesting. Do I have a passion for it? You bet. Now if we were to talk about having an aptitude for Computer Science, that would be a different ball game lol.

    Despite my programming “handicap,” I am willing to work at it. I do believe that there are some who are “better” (aptitude?) at programming than others just like there are talented painters and musicians in their fields of expertise. Although I may not be one of them, I will not give up until I have exhausted all learning avenues. This board is a good place to start examining what I should do to improve. Thanks once again. Sorry if the post should be directed at the General Board instead of this one.

  5. #20
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    Nomenclature1,

    1. You've got a vested interest, shall we say. Excellent. That also provides the motivation to work hard as it seems you've done, and are willing to continue.

    2. I'm glad to hear that you don't fit the "mold" of a fair number of 4.0 students that I've run across. Not all, of course, but more than I would have imagined.
    I'm guessing you have an aptitude for hard work. Not the worst "aptitude" to have, is it?

    Your last paragraph speaks volumes. By the way, your post needn't have gone to the General Discussion board, but I felt the responses were taking it in that direction.

    Let's put the "aptitude" issue to rest and rely on hard work instead.

    -Skipper
    "When the only tool you own is a hammer, every problem begins to resemble a nail." Abraham Maslow

  6. #21
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    I agree

    I agree with Skipper.

    Hardwork rules over aptitude.

  7. #22
    Seeking motivation... endo's Avatar
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    People with aptitude just find it easier. It was a broad statement to say that anyone can be a programmer, but I still believe pretty much anyone can be. If you're not the worlds best problem solver, the hardwork you'll have to put in will go along way to making up for it.

  8. #23
    mustang benny bennyandthejets's Avatar
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    i agree with endo. people with an aptitude for programming or problem solving will learn MORE QUICKLY, but not MORE. it would just take a bit longer for the less (programming) gifted person.

    so dont despair at all, and start simple. if you haven't done any basics, or not enough, here is a good tuturial. after learning all the concepts behind c++, and applying them on a small scale, then you can start doing things like looking at other peoples code, retyping it, trying to make little programs that solve your problems etc etc.

    and whoever said this (i forget :-) is right, try challenging yourself, that is the only way you'll discover where you make mistakes.
    benforbes@optusnet.com.au
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  9. #24
    Registered User raimo's Avatar
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    i agree with endo. people with an aptitude for programming or problem solving will learn MORE QUICKLY, but not MORE. it would just take a bit longer for the less (programming) gifted person.
    Would you tell what is the difference between MORE QUICKLY and MORE? Not a single human can possibly learn everything about programming during his life so I bet it will be useful if he learns more quickly. Learning quickly means that you actually have learned the thing. Assume that you tried to learn it for a Long Time before learning it. Then it might be that you actually haven't learned anything. It is not learning anymore, it is memorizing. "Learning" how to program C++ is memorizing and learning how to program is learning.

  10. #25
    PC Fixer-Upper Waldo2k2's Avatar
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    What kinds of things don't click...i mean specifically is it the logic? Or just how to solve the problem at hand? I had the exact same problem when i started learning javascript, it just never clicked, until I was looking at some guys code online (some tutorial at webmonkey) and it just started to make sense like "oh that's what a return is for" so anyhow, just tell us what part you don't get, and i'm sure we can help
    PHP and XML
    Let's talk about SAX

  11. #26
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    He wasn't talking about Racism in particular.

    No ..........! Thanks for pointing out the exceedingly obvious.

    I did understand the point of his post, and I believe that it wasn't related to what we were talking about. The people who assumed that black people don't have aptitude were obviously morons. But that has nothing to do with whether or not ANY particular person on the face of the planet has the aptitude for programming.

    Hardwork is a mightier way.

    Think about this:

    Lets say I wanted to become a massive body-builder like Arnold Schwartzenegger. I would put in lots of "hard work" to get there, but because of my build and my frame, there is no way in the world that I would EVER be as big/muscley as he was. It's just not possible for me.

    The point? Ultimately it doesn't matter how hard I work at body building, I would never be able to compete on the same level as Arny.

    This kind of thing doesn't just happen with someone physically, it can happen mentally aswell. This guy may be a mental Arny, he may not. The point is that some people are always going to be able to do some things alot easier than others, and some may never fully be able to do some things at all.

    have a good day all.
    U.
    Quidquid latine dictum sit, altum sonatur.
    Whatever is said in Latin sounds profound.

  12. #27
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    I'm not sure how much of your data structures was proof/coding/psudocode but you will most definitly want to work out each algorithm on paper. Data structures really isn't about c++?

  13. #28
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    Thumbs up Thanks

    Well, what a great board this is. Thanks for all the input. Will check in here soon with specific questions on programming. You guys have been helpful.

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