Outputting as binary, not ASCII

This is a discussion on Outputting as binary, not ASCII within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; I am making a game, and I want to save the stuff, so I use fout, but the problem is ...

  1. #1
    Registered User
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    Outputting as binary, not ASCII

    I am making a game, and I want to save the stuff, so I use fout, but the problem is that if I have an int that is 150, say, and I use fout, I will output it as ascii text "150", not the binary 10010110. What function do I use to do this? Thanks a lot!

  2. #2
    I'm Back
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
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    So do you want to output on screen or in file in binary ??

    either way you'll have to write some code to convert to binary. there's no functoin that does it auto. for you AFAIK.

  3. #3
    In The Light
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    howdy,
    [stupid_question]what is AFAIK, what does it stand for?[/stupid_question]

    M.R.
    I don't like you very much. Please post a lot less.
    Cheez
    *and then*
    No, I know you were joking. My point still stands.

  4. #4
    Registered User biosx's Avatar
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    AFAIK == "As Far As I Know"

    ihsir is half right. You will have to write a converter function to output the integer in binary to the screen. However, you can read and write files in binary easily. Here's an example:

    Code:
    #include <fstream>
    
    using std::istream;
    
    int main()
    {
       ifstream infile("stuff.dat", ios::in | ios::binary);
    
       infile.close();
    }
    For further explanation, look at a book or two.

  5. #5
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    How would I output 150 as 1 byte(10010110) to a file using ofstream? I think it is ofstream::write(), but I can't figure it out.

  6. #6
    Registered User biosx's Avatar
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    Usually they aren't used to write just a single number or a single character to file. They are usually used to write an array or an object to file. Here is an example of writing an object to file:

    Code:
    #include <iostream>
     using std::cerr;
     using std::endl;
     using std::ios;
    
    #include <fstream>
     using std::ofstream;
    
    // =============================
    // Dummy Class for example
    // =============================
    class MyClass {
       public:
          MyClass(int n, char *s1, char *s2);
    
       private:
          int num;
          char lastName[20];
          char firstName[15];
    };
    
    
    // ==============================
    // Main Function
    // ==============================
    int main()
    {
       ofstream outFile( "stuff.dat", ios::binary );
    
       if( !outFile ) {
          cerr << "File could not be opened." << endl;
          exit( 1 );
       }
    
       MyClass object1(99, "Dade", "Murphy");
    
       outFile.write( reinterpret_cast<const char *>(&object1), sizeof(MyClass) );
    
       outFile.close();
    
       return 0;
    }
    
    
    // ================================
    // Class constructor
    //=================================
    MyClass::MyClass(int n, char *s1, char *s2)
    {
       num = n;
       strcpy(lastName, s2);
       strcpy(firstName, s1);
    }

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