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Negating Boolean Values

This is a discussion on Negating Boolean Values within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; Hello guys, I made some research on how to negate a boolean value but none seemed to work. Ok, so ...

  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Portugal, Porto.
    Posts
    105

    Negating Boolean Values

    Hello guys, I made some research on how to negate a boolean value but none seemed to work.

    Ok, so I have the following code:

    Code:
    #include <iostream>
    
    
    using namespace std;
    
    
    int main()
    {
    	bool Turn = true;
    
    
    	for (int i = 1; i < 11; i++)
    	{
    		if (Turn = true)
    		{
    			cout<<"X";
    		}
    		else if (Turn = false)
    		{
    			cout<<"O";
    		}
    
    
    	}
    
    
    	cin.get();
    }
    As of now the code prints "XXXXXXXXXX". And I want it to print "XOXOXOXOXO", so I tried 2 different things, which did not work:

    Code:
    #include <iostream>
    
    
    using namespace std;
    
    
    int main()
    {
    	bool Turn = true;
    
    
    	for (int i = 1; i < 11; i++)
    	{
    		if (Turn = true)
    		{
    			cout<<"X";
    		}
    		else if (Turn = false)
    		{
    			cout<<"O";
    		}
    
    
    		Turn = !Turn;
    	}
    
    
    	cin.get();
    }
    AND:

    Code:
    #include <iostream>
    
    
    using namespace std;
    
    
    int main()
    {
    	bool Turn = true;
    
    
    	for (int i = 1; i < 11; i++)
    	{
    		if (Turn = true)
    		{
    			cout<<"X";
    		}
    		else if (Turn = false)
    		{
    			cout<<"O";
    		}
    
    
    		if (Turn = true)
    		{
    			Turn = false;
    		}
    		else if (Turn = false)
    		{
    			Turn = true;
    		}
    	}
    
    
    	cin.get();
    }

    Ok so I made those changes so that the boolean 'Turn' would change everytime the loop executed. Guess it doesn't work. Can anyone give me a hand?

  2. #2
    Registered User
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    2,895
    First you need to learn the difference between the assignment operator= and the comparison operator==. Look at the following snippet:
    Code:
    	for (int i = 1; i < 11; i++)
    	{
    		if (Turn = true)
    		{
    			cout<<"X";
    		}
    		else if (Turn = false)
    		{
    			cout<<"O";
    		}
    In this snippet you are using the assignment operator= so every time the loop runs it assigns true to Turn.

    Also note you don't need to use the else if(), a simple if is sufficient and you don't even need to use the comparison operator in this if statement.

    Code:
    if(Turn)
    {
       // do things.
    }
    else
    {
       // do other things.
    }
    Jim
    Khabz likes this.

  3. #3
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Portugal, Porto.
    Posts
    105
    Thanks for the explanation, I tend to mix up "==" and "=" but now I see the difference clearly.
    Fixed it now. Double thanks.

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