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Decision Making

This is a discussion on Decision Making within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; Hi, I have been admitted into University this year. In my university there is a compulsory course in C which ...

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    Decision Making

    Hi, I have been admitted into University this year. In my university there is a compulsory course in C which is going on and It has just began. But Actually I am in love of C++ that I am studying from a book on my own. Classes on C in are at initial level so I have continued my study on C++.But after a few days things are gonna change I believe.
    Sould I skip my learning in C++ and just give attention to C to improve my grade?(It is a semestar(5 month) course) and start C++ after. Or I should keep learning both same time? Syntax in C is a bit complicated though.
    N.B=I am learning C++ from C++ primer(lippman) and the book recommended by my course teacher for C is C the complete reference by herbert schildt.

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    No one can tell you how much or what you are able to learn - except yourself.

    In saying
    ...to improve my grade?
    it appears you are asking whether you should do what you like or do what you are paying for - again only you can answer this.

    Personally I would focus on that which has a better chance of benefit down the road (grades). Pull out the board game LIFE and spin the wheel, let me know what spot you land on.

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    I recommend learning both C and C++, but the advice you'll get from most members (including myself) on the C++ forum here is to learn C++ first. chances are, if you learn C++, you'll understand C readily. there are certainly more hoops to jump through and more code that has to be written to do seemingly simple things, but one of the main advantages of C is that, out of all the C-like languages, C itself allows (forces?) the programmer to have finer grained control over everything. the drawback to this is that you have to do everything explicitly, rather than rely on language features to do some things automatically, like you would in C++.
    ysg likes this.

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    Alright.. I will continue to learn both... thanks for the advice!! By the way, do you think the books are OK??

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    C++ primer is considered a good book for beginners, although I've never looked at it, and I know nothing about the C book. generally, I would say a "reference" book is a bad choice as a class textbook for beginners.

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    Cat without Hat CornedBee's Avatar
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    Be extremely wary of the C course you're enrolled in. Here's an interesting review of the book you're supposed to use:
    C: The Complete Nonsense
    Salem likes this.
    All the buzzt!
    CornedBee

    "There is not now, nor has there ever been, nor will there ever be, any programming language in which it is the least bit difficult to write bad code."
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    Herbert Schildt is notable for writing books that very readable (so publishers like them, and they sell well) but describe C in profoundly incorrect and misleading ways.


    People I trust have been quite positive about "C++ Primer" by Lippman, Lajoie, and Moo, but can't say I used it in earnest myself. Best to get a latest edition if possible. And be careful, as there are some books with similar names, by different authors, that are reportedly dreadful.
    Right 98% of the time, and don't care about the other 3%.

    If I seem grumpy in reply to you, it is likely you deserve it. Suck it up, sunshine, and read this, this, and this before posting again.

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    and the hat of wrongness Salem's Avatar
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    Not forgetting
    bullschildt
    If you dance barefoot on the broken glass of undefined behaviour, you've got to expect the occasional cut.
    If at first you don't succeed, try writing your phone number on the exam paper.
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    Registered User C_ntua's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    Not forgetting
    bullschildt
    Wasn't aware of this and reading about it I have to admit that I am a just shocked...

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    Registered User whiteflags's Avatar
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    It's a slang term in a slang dictionary, though. So some words probably aren't even fads.

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    Thanks for this information guys. I will be careful from now onwards. So, Which book do you recommend for C?

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    I have also the book , "The C" by dennis ritchie. Is this book helpful?

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    Registered User whiteflags's Avatar
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    If you are learning C: The C Programming Language (2nd edition) by Brian Kernighan and Dennis Ritchie is a good book, but it is dated. It was dated when I read it. Do not treat it as your last book is my advice. http://cboard.cprogramming.com/showthread.php?t=74079

    If you are learning C++: No.

    If you are learning C and C++: A C book, of course, doesn't teach C++. If you are learning object oriented programming for the first time, if you are learning your first language, then I would not recommend learning C and C++ in tandem. This is largely because you are also learning how to program, and C and C++ code have different paradigms for software development. You would be learning object oriented stuff in C++ but you wouldn't be able to apply that in C. These kinds of headaches are avoidable. If you have a language under your belt, you can do whatever you want and I don't really care.

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    Actually,for this year my target is to compete in ACM-ICPC.. Which doesnt require Object oriented programming i guess. So learning C and C++ basics will be helpful because in some problems It is easier to solve in C than C++ and vice versa. There is also the matter of time limit.. so I think I should learn both shouldnt I?

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    Registered User whiteflags's Avatar
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    So learning C and C++ basics will be helpful because in some problems It is easier to solve in C than C++ and vice versa.
    In general this is not true. C and C++ are Turing complete, which means that they can solve any problem that a computer can solve. If you are worried about your skills for the contest, the more problems you can solve in 1 language is more important than half-understanding 2 languages, especially since you will be judged on your professionalism, essentially.

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