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Learning C++...

This is a discussion on Learning C++... within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; Hey all.. i have been learning C++ and have finished the Beginner C++ tutorial and just started the functors lesson ...

  1. #1
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    Question Learning C++...

    Hey all..
    i have been learning C++ and have finished the Beginner C++ tutorial
    and just started the functors lesson in C++ Advanced tutorial...

    However, in this Series and in the other Series, Alex Allain talks about
    something called STL, vector and stuff like that...

    i dont know what that means but i have seen a tutorial series in the
    website called: "C++ Standard Template Library (STL) tutorials"...

    So i wanted to ask if, in the website the tutorials are not in order..

    since i am a beginner in C++ and have completed only the beg. series and the advance series(5 tutorials)... i dont know about c++ anything other than what has been taught so far in the website...

    so can anyone of you please take some time to reply to this post...
    and in the reply mention the order of the tutorial series i must learn

    (from a beginner to expert)

    please guys...
    help me out...


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    I've got no idea if the particular tutorials you are using are in order (that's up to the author) or if another order would be better. Nobody would. Such things are highly subjective.

    What I can do is explain what the relationship between the STL and the C++ standard library.


    The STL (Standard Template Library) is the name of a library designed by Alex Stepanov. The STL originally implemented a bunch of stuff in four categories.
    • the containers (vector, list, etc),
    • algorithms (which perform algorithmic operations on containers and other sequences),
    • function objects (sometimes called functors - essentially implemented as a class that provides an operator()),
    • iterators (objects that support iterating over elements of a container, without exposing implementation details of that container).

    Eventually, the specification of the STL (with some modifications) became part of the C++ standard library (the library specified in the ANSI/ISO C++ standard released in 1998).

    The other parts of the C++ standard library - which existed before the STL - include I/O (all iostream and related types), the string class, and wrappers for the C standard library.

    The name "STL" therefore, now, informally refers to parts of the C++ standard library listed above.

    The 2011 C++ standard also added a number of other capabilities that originated in a library called boost.
    Right 98% of the time, and don't care about the other 3%.

  3. #3
    C++まいる!Cをこわせ! Elysia's Avatar
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    Tutorials aren't enough to learn the language. I would strongly recommend you get a beginner's book at some convenient time in the future (preferably as soon as possible).
    A highly recommended beginner's book is C++ Primer (5th Edition) by Stanley Lippman, Josée Lajoie and Barbara Moo.
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Elysia View Post
    Tutorials aren't enough to learn the language. I would strongly recommend you get a beginner's book at some convenient time in the future (preferably as soon as possible).
    A highly recommended beginner's book is C++ Primer (5th Edition) by Stanley Lippman, Josée Lajoie and Barbara Moo.
    but whats the use?
    anyways the site contains more info than the book

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    Registered User whiteflags's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tennisstar View Post
    anyways the site contains more info than the book
    But that's wrong.
    Elysia likes this.

  6. #6
    C++まいる!Cをこわせ! Elysia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by whiteflags View Post
    But that's wrong.
    Correction: So very wrong...
    The use is that it will teach you the basics. The site will only teach you a small subset, which is not enough to go on when first learning C++.
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.

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