Like Tree2Likes
  • 1 Post By manasij7479
  • 1 Post By laserlight

start with c++ immediately?

This is a discussion on start with c++ immediately? within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; Hi guys, I'm a newby here so please, don't get angry if I'm not supposed to ask this here. In ...

  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    6

    Question start with c++ immediately?

    Hi guys, I'm a newby here so please, don't get angry if I'm not supposed to ask this here.

    In the past I've programmed a little in VB and PHP for college, but I forgot most of it (However, I'm sure that I can pick it up again). I do however understand quite a bit of the "theory" behind programming.

    I had to quit college a year and a half ago, but lately I've been really interested in getting into programming (again...), and I was wondering what the wise thing to do would be:
    -Start learning C, then move on to C++
    or
    -Start with C++ right away

    I already own a book on C++ that is regarded as the best one to begin with in my language (Dutch) by alot of people.

    My goal in the end would be to be able to program games (cliché, I know), but my motivation to start learning C++ is because I want to go to college to study Application Development, and I think it'd be nice to have knowledge of a powerful language like C++.

    tl;dr
    should I start to learn programming in C++ or start off with C?

  2. #2
    Registered User manasij7479's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Kolkata@India
    Posts
    2,498
    Start with C++, unless your goal is to learn C(or both).
    Btw.. there are a lot of bad C++ books, and the worst ones are often the most publicly recommended ones(teaching old C++, C with classes..etc).
    So, it'd be better for you to pick up a standard one.
    ( The Definitive C++ Book Guide and List - Stack Overflow )
    Manasij Mukherjee | gcc-4.8.2 @Arch Linux
    Slow and Steady wins the race... if and only if :
    1.None of the other participants are fast and steady.
    2.The fast and unsteady suddenly falls asleep while running !



  3. #3
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    6
    Thanks for the tip!

    Well I have
    Aan de slag met C++ by Gertjan Laan
    and
    Sam's Teach yourself C++ in 21 Days (read good reviews after I saw it on this site, so ordered it)

  4. #4
    Registered User manasij7479's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Kolkata@India
    Posts
    2,498
    Quote Originally Posted by DennChooch View Post
    Sam's Teach yourself C++ in 21 Days (read good reviews after I saw it on this site, so ordered it)
    That would (probably) be an example of what I said, read this review : ACCU :: Book Reviews Search

    Btw..mentioning 21 days will get you this reply almost everywhere.
    Teach Yourself Programming in Ten Years
    GReaper likes this.
    Manasij Mukherjee | gcc-4.8.2 @Arch Linux
    Slow and Steady wins the race... if and only if :
    1.None of the other participants are fast and steady.
    2.The fast and unsteady suddenly falls asleep while running !



  5. #5
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    200
    Obviously there's no one right answer, but I'd start with C, personally. C++ is a huge language with an awful lot of pitfalls - I think you'd save yourself a lot of pain by getting a good grounding in C (which, will include things like pointers and addressing) before moving onto C++.

  6. #6
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by JohnGraham View Post
    Obviously there's no one right answer, but I'd start with C, personally. C++ is a huge language with an awful lot of pitfalls - I think you'd save yourself a lot of pain by getting a good grounding in C (which, will include things like pointers and addressing) before moving onto C++.
    That makes sense. I also heard C is a little less complex than C++, so yeah, getting a decent grounding in C sounds like a good idea.

    What would be a great book to begin with?

  7. #7
    Programming Wraith GReaper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Greece
    Posts
    1,616
    Quote Originally Posted by DennChooch View Post
    That makes sense. I also heard C is a little less complex than C++, so yeah, getting a decent grounding in C sounds like a good idea.
    You may end up with a lot of bad habits though if you start with C. When learning something, I always go from high to low for avoiding these hazards!
    Devoted my life to programming...

  8. #8
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    6
    Hmmm.. well thatīs something Iīd rather avoid... Itīs hard to decide what to start with, haha, I donīt want to get demotivated so thatīs why Iīm asking you guys for help. Thanks for the help so far, keep it cominī!

  9. #9
    C++ Witch laserlight's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    21,409
    Quote Originally Posted by DennChooch
    I also heard C is a little less complex than C++, so yeah, getting a decent grounding in C sounds like a good idea.
    In my opinion, if you are going for "little less complex" as your main criteria for a programming language as a beginner, then you would be better off with Python. The syntax can read the pseudocode once you know the basic structures, upon which you will be concentrating on developing your program problem solving skills.

    But should you? If you are set on learning C++, then learn C++. Yes, C++ is complex and has many pitfalls, but you don't have to tackle all that complexity on the get go. Bjarne Stroustrup, the designer and original implementer of C++, has written an article on Learning Standard C++ as a New Language (PDF) in which he recommends against learning the C subset of C++ first, in view that it "leads to an early focus on low-level details (...) obscures programming style and design issues by (forcing) the student to face many technical difficulties to express anything interesting". One idea here is to use the high level facilities of C++, especially the commonly used components of the C++ standard library, then move towards learning how to implement the tools that you use.

    The book I recommend in this regard is Accelerated C++: Practical Programming by Example. It is slightly dated given that the latest version of the C++ standard was published last year, but by and large you will still be able to use it to learn how to program in C++, then get up to speed on the latest and greatest in C++ elsewhere.
    manasij7479 likes this.
    C + C++ Compiler: MinGW port of GCC
    Version Control System: Bazaar

    Look up a C++ Reference and learn How To Ask Questions The Smart Way

  10. #10
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    6
    Alright. I decided to order Accelerated C++, and will work that through once I have it.
    More tips are welcome, though, and I thank you all for your help so far.

    Edit: had to cancel the order due to money...
    Last edited by DennChooch; 09-26-2012 at 10:37 AM.

Popular pages Recent additions subscribe to a feed

Similar Threads

  1. I Need An immediately Help plz
    By SONY in forum C++ Programming
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 10-17-2007, 10:34 PM
  2. Need Help Immediately
    By McGOOF in forum C Programming
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 11-23-2004, 11:27 AM
  3. help needed immediately
    By noob2c in forum C Programming
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 04-11-2003, 04:57 PM
  4. Immediately responding to keypresses?
    By blackwyvern in forum C++ Programming
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-19-2002, 09:15 PM

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21