Book of mini games

This is a discussion on Book of mini games within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; I was wondering if anyone had com across a book of small projects centered around programming mini games that consume ...

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    Book of mini games

    I was wondering if anyone had com across a book of small projects centered around programming mini games that consume about one to two hours time for the purpose of practicing the language?

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    A book about games that only take an hour or two to program doesn't seem like something that would exist. It would take a bit longer than that, even for something quite trivial.

    Are you speaking about console based, or graphic?

    You'd probably be better off finding games for which you can program yourself, without a book (minesweeper, blackjack, mastermind, etc).

    If you're looking to whet your whistle, there's a good contest going on here right now that you might enjoy.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Matticus View Post
    A book about games that only take an hour or two to program doesn't seem like something that would exist. It would take a bit longer than that, even for something quite trivial.

    Are you speaking about console based, or graphic?

    You'd probably be better off finding games for which you can program yourself, without a book (minesweeper, blackjack, mastermind, etc).

    If you're looking to whet your whistle, there's a good contest going on here right now that you might enjoy.
    I was not keen on in-depth problem solving because I like to learn a language through exercises such as programming simple games or other types of assignments that can hone learned syntax and semantics rather than bog one down in hours of endless coding of a problem that detracts from the learning process.

    This is the crux of my interest in such a book or website, etc. They would be simple console-based to keep their workload light. I will check the link you posted.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Matticus View Post
    A book about games that only take an hour or two to program doesn't seem like something that would exist. It would take a bit longer than that, even for something quite trivial.

    Are you speaking about console based, or graphic?

    You'd probably be better off finding games for which you can program yourself, without a book (minesweeper, blackjack, mastermind, etc).

    If you're looking to whet your whistle, there's a good contest going on here right now that you might enjoy.
    I was not keen on in-depth problem solving because I like to learn a language through exercises such as programming simple games or other types of assignments that can hone learned syntax and semantics rather than bog one down in hours of endless coding of a problem that detracts from the learning process.

    This is the crux of my interest in such a book or website, etc. They would be simple console-based to keep their workload light. I will check the link you posted.

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    Yes, but even a "simple" game is not necessarily simple to code. It probably won't be "endless" hours of programming, but it could take up to a whole day (likely several) just to get something basic out.

    Little programs are essential for learning, but there are precious few games you could bang out in an hour or two.

    Maybe someone else might have a link or book for you, but I don't. However, here are some suggestions that may help you get started:

    Mastermind
    Hangman
    Battleship
    War
    Snake

    Rather than consider "finishing a game" an accomplishment, you might find enjoyment in slowly building a game, where each step is an accomplishment.

    For instance, let's say you want to make the game "Snake."

    Accomplishment #1: Figure out how to define a 2D array to represent a "map", and print it out to the screen. (You've gained some experience with multi-dimensional arrays.)
    Accomplishment #2: Figure out how to make a little "head" appear on the map, and move around depending on the keyboard input, within the given boundaries. (You've gained some experience with manipulating 2D arrays, along with some basic collision detecting).
    Accomplishment #3: Add some randomly-placed "fruit" to the game board. (You've gain more experience with manipulating 2D arrays, and working with random values.)
    Accomplishment #4: Start to implement the "body" of the Snake. (You've gained some experience with algorithms.).
    Accomplishment #5: Add increasing speed as the size of the Snake increased. (You've gained some experience with having your program change depending on the current circumstances.)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Matticus View Post
    Yes, but even a "simple" game is not necessarily simple to code. It probably won't be "endless" hours of programming, but it could take up to a whole day (likely several) just to get something basic out.

    Little programs are essential for learning, but there are precious few games you could bang out in an hour or two.

    Maybe someone else might have a link or book for you, but I don't. However, here are some suggestions that may help you get started:

    Mastermind
    Hangman
    Battleship
    War
    Snake

    Rather than consider "finishing a game" an accomplishment, you might find enjoyment in slowly building a game, where each step is an accomplishment.

    For instance, let's say you want to make the game "Snake."

    Accomplishment #1: Figure out how to define a 2D array to represent a "map", and print it out to the screen. (You've gained some experience with multi-dimensional arrays.)
    Accomplishment #2: Figure out how to make a little "head" appear on the map, and move around depending on the keyboard input, within the given boundaries. (You've gained some experience with manipulating 2D arrays, along with some basic collision detecting).
    Accomplishment #3: Add some randomly-placed "fruit" to the game board. (You've gain more experience with manipulating 2D arrays, and working with random values.)
    Accomplishment #4: Start to implement the "body" of the Snake. (You've gained some experience with algorithms.).
    Accomplishment #5: Add increasing speed as the size of the Snake increased. (You've gained some experience with having your program change depending on the current circumstances.)
    I think it would be challenging and fun, no doubt. I am still in the learning phase ad about to finish up C++ Primer. I would like to put a project together at some point but my style of short programs demonstrating multiple aspects of the language and not requiring to much time drives me to avoid doing this until I finish the book and then start the review, coding a nice size game or other project.

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