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Difference between mod and bitwise And operator

This is a discussion on Difference between mod and bitwise And operator within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; Hi, Can someone give me the differences between & and % ? I have the following algorithm which limits a ...

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    Difference between mod and bitwise And operator

    Hi,
    Can someone give me the differences between & and % ?
    I have the following algorithm which limits a random variable to 255 only.

    int nRand = rand();
    nRand %= 255;

    Now , doesn't the last statement have similar effect when replacing it with this.
    nRand &= 255;
    ?

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    C++ Witch laserlight's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swoorup
    Can someone give me the differences between & and % ?
    What do those operations do?

    Quote Originally Posted by Swoorup
    I have the following algorithm which limits a random variable to 255 only.

    int nRand = rand();
    nRand %= 255;
    Actually, that would set 254 to be the upper limit, but it presumably is a typo and you wanted to write 256.

    Quote Originally Posted by Swoorup
    Now , doesn't the last statement have similar effect when replacing it with this.
    nRand &= 255;
    Yes (once the typo is corrected), but that is just a coincidence.
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    So, you mean, they are the same
    if I change nRand %= 255 to
    nRand %= 256?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Swoorup
    So, you mean, they are the same
    if I change nRand %= 255 to
    nRand %= 256?
    No, they are not the same. They will just have the same effect of limiting the range of the value.
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    I see, thank you.
    Which one would be the most effective for picking random though?

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    Changing x %= 256 into x &= 256 is an optimisation many compilers can do for themselves.

    If you're going to optimise anything, then focus on the whole algorithm (like bubble sort vs. quicksort) where your skills can make a real difference.
    Micro optimisations at the single operator level won't do much for you.
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    Hmm, thank you
    Is the opmization of the compiler like this though? when x %= 256 then x &= 255 not x &= 256

    I am learning about the lower-level details of C++ and finding out the relation between assembly and C++ via debugging them. So, minor things like this happened to boggle my mind :P

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    Quote Originally Posted by Swoorup
    Is the opmization of the compiler like this though? when x %= 256 then x &= 255
    Maybe. It depends on whether the compiler can prove that the result will always be the same. For example, -1 % 256 == -1, but -1 % 255 == 255, assuming two's complement. Now, we know for sure that rand() returns a non-negative integer, but the compiler may or may not be able to determine this, or if it can, it might not have done so. Then, there's the issue of proving that for every non-negative integer i in the range of int, (i % 256) == (i & 255).
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