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Which one of those books should i read it!

This is a discussion on Which one of those books should i read it! within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; well, i got " Jumping into C++" and " Accelerated C++", and i am wondering which one it's better for ...

  1. #1
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    Lightbulb Which one of those books should i read it!

    well, i got " Jumping into C++" and " Accelerated C++", and i am wondering which one it's better for a new person to the programming world!!:

    1) Which book should i read ?
    2) IF i should read both, which one should i read it first ?!

    NOTE: Please don't answer unless you know both of them, and had read them before wisely !!

    Thanks by the way !

  2. #2
    and the hat of wrongness Salem's Avatar
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    Learning to program takes a lot longer than it would take to read either book, no matter which order you read them in.

    Newbies seem to be under the continual impression that if they just find the "right book" then they'll be wizards in no time.

    Unfortunately, this isn't even close to being true -> Teach Yourself Programming in Ten Years

    Also "best" is an entirely subjective statement. What's best for you might not be what was best for me, or best for anyone else.
    Since we don't know you, saying "choose A then B" (whilst locally true for me) means diddly-squat to you.
    If you dance barefoot on the broken glass of undefined behaviour, you've got to expect the occasional cut.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    Learning to program takes a lot longer than it would take to read either book, no matter which order you read them in.

    Newbies seem to be under the continual impression that if they just find the "right book" then they'll be wizards in no time.

    Unfortunately, this isn't even close to being true -> Teach Yourself Programming in Ten Years

    Also "best" is an entirely subjective statement. What's best for you might not be what was best for me, or best for anyone else.
    Since we don't know you, saying "choose A then B" (whilst locally true for me) means diddly-squat to you.
    yes you are right!; it takes time to learn something especially C++;
    well, all i think these 2 books not the same, as "jumping into C+" mentio a chapter about "File I/O " and acceleraed C++ never mention that and other things, so shall i read both or one please advice me as an expert

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    Registered User manasij7479's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by iCoder View Post
    "jumping into C+" mentio a chapter about "File I/O " and acceleraed C++ never mention that ...
    lolwut ?
    Seriously, look again. It is within another chapter.
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  5. #5
    Master Apprentice phantomotap's Avatar
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    Learning to program takes a lot longer than it would take to read either book, no matter which order you read them in.
    Be fair! Learning to program is also a lot more than learning language $(ProgrammingLanguage).

    *shrug*

    That said, if you want to learn C++ in the many years it will take you to become a great programmer I recommend these books and in approximate this order.

    Soma

    Code:
    Accelerated C++
    The C++ Standard Library
    Effective C++
    More Effective C++
    Effective STL
    Exceptional C++
    More Exceptional C++
    Exceptional C++ Style
    C++ Templates
    C++ Template Meta-programming

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    Quote Originally Posted by manasij7479 View Post
    lolwut ?
    Seriously, look again. It is within another chapter.
    file I/O is not existed in accelerated C++, btw is there something missed n lessons in accelerated C++ and exist in "Jumping into C++" ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by phantomotap View Post
    Be fair! Learning to program is also a lot more than learning language $(ProgrammingLanguage).

    *shrug*

    That said, if you want to learn C++ in the many years it will take you to become a great programmer I recommend these books and in approximate this order.

    Soma

    Code:
    Accelerated C++
    The C++ Standard Library
    Effective C++
    More Effective C++
    Effective STL
    Exceptional C++
    More Exceptional C++
    Exceptional C++ Style
    C++ Templates
    C++ Template Meta-programming
    well, thanks alot for your help, i might start with acceletrated C++ within less than 1 month !, after reading the first book you feel yourself you can write good programms or it will be early ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by iCoder View Post
    file I/O is not existed in accelerated C++
    Chapter 10 ( Contents: Accelerated C++ )
    Manasij Mukherjee | gcc-4.8.2 @Arch Linux
    Slow and Steady wins the race... if and only if :
    1.None of the other participants are fast and steady.
    2.The fast and unsteady suddenly falls asleep while running !



  9. #9
    Master Apprentice phantomotap's Avatar
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    file I/O is not existed in accelerated C++
    False. The book does focus on the `std::istream' and `std:stream' classes in general while almost exclusively using `std::cin' and `std::cout'. However, the file stream types are referenced. Because of the design of the C++ standard library this is sufficient for text files. Binary files will need you to reach beyond that one book. I can't think of any one book that offers anything near the coverage of "Accelarated C++" and provides reasonable coverage of binary files. The book just doesn't have chapters devoted to files storage or transmission.

    after reading the first book you feel yourself you can write good programms or it will be early
    There is no such book that will teach you to write good source for the real world. The real world is dirty and disgusting. The real world requires hacks and despicable code to get things to work correctly. The real world requires you to write a lot of code to deal with fiddly issues of your operating system. The real world requires you to constantly probe functions for errors or invalid conditions. You don't want to learn to code for the real world until you have a firm understanding of the basics.

    Happily, the basics are exactly what "Accelerated C++" teaches. You will not be a programming god after working through all of those books, but if you do the work you will be a great C++ programmer. But yes, you can be writing useful or fun programs, even if the code isn't great, long before you work your way through that first book. However, you will have to do the work; don't expect to power through any programming book in any increment of "minutes a day", "hours", "days", or "weeks". It takes time and above all practice. Unless you are an idiot though, I can promise you that you will not be disappointed with that progression if learning C++ programming is your goal.

    Soma
    rags_to_riches and iCoder like this.

  10. #10
    Registered User manasij7479's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by iCoder View Post
    well, thanks alot for your help, i might start with acceletrated C++ within less than 1 month !,
    Within less than a month sounds very familiar to never. Try 'now' .
    after reading the first book you feel yourself you can write good programms or it will be early ?
    Of course (imho)... but you underestimate the effort needed to read the first book.
    Manasij Mukherjee | gcc-4.8.2 @Arch Linux
    Slow and Steady wins the race... if and only if :
    1.None of the other participants are fast and steady.
    2.The fast and unsteady suddenly falls asleep while running !



  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by manasij7479 View Post
    ops, missed it !.. thanks

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    Quote Originally Posted by phantomotap View Post
    False. The book does focus on the `std::istream' and `std:stream' classes in general while almost exclusively using `std::cin' and `std::cout'. However, the file stream types are referenced. Because of the design of the C++ standard library this is sufficient for text files. Binary files will need you to reach beyond that one book. I can't think of any one book that offers anything near the coverage of "Accelarated C++" and provides reasonable coverage of binary files. The book just doesn't have chapters devoted to files storage or transmission.



    There is no such book that will teach you to write good source for the real world. The real world is dirty and disgusting. The real world requires hacks and despicable code to get things to work correctly. The real world requires you to write a lot of code to deal with fiddly issues of your operating system. The real world requires you to constantly probe functions for errors or invalid conditions. You don't want to learn to code for the real world until you have a firm understanding of the basics.

    Happily, the basics are exactly what "Accelerated C++" teaches. You will not be a programming god after working through all of those books, but if you do the work you will be a great C++ programmer. But yes, you can be writing useful or fun programs, even if the code isn't great, long before you work your way through that first book. However, you will have to do the work; don't expect to power through any programming book in any increment of "minutes a day", "hours", "days", or "weeks". It takes time and above all practice. Unless you are an idiot though, I can promise you that you will not be disappointed with that progression if learning C++ programming is your goal.

    Soma
    thanks soma, i got your point!
    Quote Originally Posted by manasij7479 View Post
    Within less than a month sounds very familiar to never. Try 'now'
    Of course (imho)... but you underestimate the effort needed to read the first book.
    well, if i am not busy i want really to start now before tomorrow, but you know life!

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    is it a good choice to read "accelerated C++" even if you are new to programming in general !?

  14. #14
    C++ Witch laserlight's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by iCoder
    is it a good choice to read "accelerated C++" even if you are new to programming in general !?
    If you have a C++ compiler setup and are able to use it to compile C++ programs, then yes.
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