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How do I create a filename with multiple variable types

This is a discussion on How do I create a filename with multiple variable types within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; [Edit]This all came off a little rude; I apologize for that. That was not my intent.[/Edit] What does that <anonymous ...

  1. #16
    Master Apprentice phantomotap's Avatar
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    [Edit]This all came off a little rude; I apologize for that. That was not my intent.[/Edit]

    What does that <anonymous > mean, though ?
    In this particular case it is implying that some details of the standard C++ library provided by "MSVC" has some details implemented in a nested anonymous "namespace" probably for the sake of implementation clarity.

    Code:
    namespace test
    {
    namespace
    {
    // this is anonymous... GUY!
    }
    }
    But the WHY is what I don't understand.
    O_o

    It doesn't work for several reasons, but most of them all relate to the same issue; you are attempting to transform a "r-value" to a "l-value". "MSVC" is really not strict enough with constants and references.

    You are also using `char' for a temporary and member variable instead of the correct type. You aren't allowing for the full "weight" of the template. (Using custom traits breaks the code.)

    The worst offense however is using `assert' to check for a condition that must always be performed otherwise the mechanism simply "does not do what is says on the lid". Please, if you don't know exactly how to use `assert', do not use it all. It is better to always perform a check that isn't strictly necessary than to not perform a check that is always necessary.

    All that said, the approach is wrong. There is no reason to transform the stream (by wrapping it in another component).

    The implementation manasij7479 used isn't correct or complete, but the simpler approach is better.

    Soma
    Last edited by phantomotap; 02-11-2012 at 04:41 PM.

  2. #17
    Registered User manasij7479's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by phantomotap View Post
    The implementation manasij7479 used isn't correct or complete, but the simpler approach is better.
    Not complete, I can see..but why not correct ? It (seems) to work for me when testing with some different types.
    Manasij Mukherjee | gcc-4.8.2 @Arch Linux
    Slow and Steady wins the race... if and only if :
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    2.The fast and unsteady suddenly falls asleep while running !



  3. #18
    Master Apprentice phantomotap's Avatar
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    *shrug*

    In fairness to you, virtually everyone does it wrong for class defined stream operations. (I even forget the standard "preamble" about half the time and must go back.) It is never completely covered, just like locales. This issue always bugs me.

    For the sake of simplicity, let me just show the result after the change.

    Code:
        istream& operator()(istream& is)
        {
            istream::sentry cerberus(is);
            if(cerberus)
            {
                T temp;
                is>>temp;
                if(temp!=t)is.setstate(ios_base::failbit);
            }
            return is;
        }
    If you are wondering if that change is really worth worrying about, I can assure you that it is a necessary bit of code. (It looks similar for `ostream'.)

    It doesn't mean anything most of the time, but when the issue occurs at run-time it becomes extremely important (also annoyingly vague).

    A trivial example would be a class specific insertion operation. The standard requires exception safe stream primitives and implies sequencing. (It just isn't specific using "implementation defined" language.) Those requirements and implications almost demand the creation of `sentry' objects even for user defined class stream operators because almost anything may happen. (Such as `setstate' raising an exception.) It is your job, as the implementer of the fictional class, to properly implement the requirements the interface demands. (These demands include certain stream components being reset at the end of the stream operation.) It is difficult to get it right without `sentry'; happily, it is easy to use the `sentry' class.

    It is even possible, but admittedly extremely unlikely, that a stream operation could trigger an exception in an unfamiliar frame even with the use of locking primitives at a different level. (I've seen it; I've had to debug it.)

    If you don't know what that means, just know that it is probably one of the most difficult to debug things you'll ever hear of and you can trivially make it not your fault, via bad stream operation, by constructing the `sentry' object.

    Soma

  4. #19
    C++まいる!Cをこわせ! Elysia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by phantomotap View Post
    It doesn't work for several reasons, but most of them all relate to the same issue; you are attempting to transform a "r-value" to a "l-value". "MSVC" is really not strict enough with constants and references.
    Ah, of course.
    *smacks forehead*

    You are also using `char' for a temporary and member variable instead of the correct type. You aren't allowing for the full "weight" of the template. (Using custom traits breaks the code.)
    Well pointed out. That is a bug which I have fixed.

    The worst offense however is using `assert' to check for a condition that must always be performed otherwise the mechanism simply "does not do what is says on the lid". Please, if you don't know exactly how to use `assert', do not use it all. It is better to always perform a check that isn't strictly necessary than to not perform a check that is always necessary.
    In my opinion, it is always better to do something than nothing at all.
    We have three choices: ignore it, assert it or throw an exception. Which one is best? I don't know. Therefore, I put an assert there to remind me that if I did something wrong, I would become reminded.

    All that said, the approach is wrong. There is no reason to transform the stream (by wrapping it in another component).

    The implementation manasij7479 used isn't correct or complete, but the simpler approach is better.
    I'm almost afraid to ask what a "better" solution that doesn't involve explicitly specifying template parameters would be.
    Also, this isn't about simpler. If it was simple, I could just use a dummy temp char variable to read into. This is just about implementing laserlight's solution in any way or form for fun.

    ^_^
    So I made another attempt to fix the problems (and this time it compiles with GCC; woohoo!):

    Code:
    #include <sstream>
    #include <iostream>
    #include <vector>
    #include <assert.h>
    
    #define BASIC_ISTREAM std::basic_istream<StreamT, std::char_traits<StreamT>>
    
    template<typename StreamT>
    class XLiteral
    {
    public:
    	XLiteral(StreamT c): m_c(c) {}
    	void SetStream(BASIC_ISTREAM& stream) { m_stream = &stream; }
    	template<typename T> XLiteral& operator >> (T& rhs) { assert(m_stream); *m_stream >> rhs; return *this; }
    	XLiteral& operator >> (XLiteral&& rhs);
    	StreamT GetChar() const { return m_c; }
    
    protected:
    	BASIC_ISTREAM* m_stream;
    	StreamT m_c;
    };
    
    template<typename StreamT>
    void ExtractLiteral(BASIC_ISTREAM& stream, XLiteral<StreamT>&& literal)
    {
    	StreamT tmp;
    	stream >> tmp;
    	// How do we handle the case when the read literal isn't what we specified to the call to literal?
    	assert(tmp == literal.GetChar());
    	literal.SetStream(stream);
    }
    
    template<typename StreamT>
    XLiteral<StreamT>& XLiteral<StreamT>::operator >> (XLiteral<StreamT>&& rhs) { ExtractLiteral(*m_stream, std::move(rhs)); return *this; }
    
    
    template<typename StreamT>
    XLiteral<StreamT> & operator >> (BASIC_ISTREAM& lhs, XLiteral<StreamT>&& rhs)
    {
    	ExtractLiteral(lhs, std::move(rhs));
    	return rhs;
    }
    
    template<typename StreamT>
    XLiteral<StreamT> literal(StreamT c) { return XLiteral<StreamT>(c); }
    
    int main()
    {
    	int month, day, year;
    	std::stringstream ss("31-01-12");
    
    	//ss >> day >> literal('-') >> month >> literal('-');
    	ss >> day >> literal('-') >> month >> literal('-') >> year;
    }
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.

  5. #20
    Registered User manasij7479's Avatar
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    >// How do we handle the case when the read literal isn't what we specified to the call to literal?
    Set failbit ?
    Manasij Mukherjee | gcc-4.8.2 @Arch Linux
    Slow and Steady wins the race... if and only if :
    1.None of the other participants are fast and steady.
    2.The fast and unsteady suddenly falls asleep while running !



  6. #21
    C++ Witch laserlight's Avatar
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    Since you people seem rather interested, I have attached the file that I uploaded to the then-existing Boost Vault as the proof of concept for my interest check to Boost concerning such an input manipulator. I made this interest check before I approached brewbuck, with the code inspired by an input manipulator implementation in some version of g++'s standard library implementation.

    A member of the Boost mailing list pointed out that changing basic_istream itself to overload operator>> could be better than a manipulator if this were ever to be added to the C++ standard: Interest check: constant input matching manipulator.

    Note that this is just code to start a discussion: it is not guaranteed to be robust, complete, efficient or even correct; in addition to the disclaimers in the Boost license, I stress that I accept no liability for any damages resulting from the use of the code. You have been warned

    EDIT:
    Quote Originally Posted by Elysia
    In my opinion, it is always better to do something than nothing at all.
    We have three choices: ignore it, assert it or throw an exception. Which one is best? I don't know. Therefore, I put an assert there to remind me that if I did something wrong, I would become reminded.
    The mistake is that you made a function call in your assertion. If the assertion is disabled, rhs.GetChar() is not called, which looks wrong, don't you agree?

    EDIT #2: Oh, but GetChar() is a const member function with no side effects, so I guess that's okay here.

    EDIT #3: Come to think of it, the header file is less than 100 lines long, so I might as well post it here for those who would rather not download it:
    Code:
    #ifndef BOOST_IOMANIP_HPP_
    #define BOOST_IOMANIP_HPP_
    
    //          Copyright Eugene Wee 2009.
    // Distributed under the Boost Software License, Version 1.0.
    //    (See accompanying file LICENSE_1_0.txt or copy at
    //          http://www.boost.org/LICENSE_1_0.txt)
    
    /* boost::iomanip::literal is an input stream manipulator that matches input
     * with a specified string or character literal. If the input read matches the
     * literal, it is ignored, otherwise the stream is placed in a failed state.
     * Whitespace is not skipped, hence the std::ws manipulator should be used to
     * skip preceding whitespace, if necessary.
     */
    
    #include <string>
    #include <memory>
    #include <istream>
    #include <ios>
    
    namespace boost
    {
    namespace iomanip
    {
        namespace detail
        {
            // Implementation defined type to implement the manipulator.
            template<typename charT, typename Traits = std::char_traits<charT>,
                typename Allocator = std::allocator<charT> >
            struct token_matcher
            {
                typedef std::basic_string<charT, Traits, Allocator> token_type;
                token_matcher(const token_type& token) : token(token) {}
                token_type token;
            };
    
            // Extracts and matches input character-wise from the stream.
            template<typename charT, typename Traits, typename Allocator>
            std::basic_istream<charT, Traits>&
            operator>>(std::basic_istream<charT, Traits>& in,
                token_matcher<charT, Traits, Allocator> matcher)
            {
                typename std::basic_string<charT, Traits, Allocator>::iterator
                    i = matcher.token.begin(),
                    end = matcher.token.end();
                typename std::basic_istream<charT, Traits>::char_type c;
                for (; i != end && in.get(c); ++i)
                {
                    if (*i != c)
                    {
                        in.clear(std::basic_ios<charT, Traits>::failbit);
                        break;
                    }
                }
    
                return in;
            }
        } // namespace detail
    
        // Match with literals as standard string objects.
        template<typename charT, typename Traits, typename Allocator>
        inline
        detail::token_matcher<charT, Traits, Allocator>
        literal(const std::basic_string<charT, Traits, Allocator>& token)
        {
            return detail::token_matcher<charT, Traits, Allocator>(token);
        }
    
        // Match with literals as null terminated strings.
        template<typename charT>
        inline detail::token_matcher<charT> literal(const charT* token)
        {
            return detail::token_matcher<charT>(std::basic_string<charT>(token));
        }
    
        // Match with literals as individual characters.
        template<typename charT>
        inline detail::token_matcher<charT> literal(charT token)
        {
            return detail::token_matcher<charT>(std::basic_string<charT>(1, token));
        }
    } // namespace iomanip
    } // namespace boost
    
    #endif
    Attached Files Attached Files
    Last edited by laserlight; 02-12-2012 at 02:27 AM.
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  7. #22
    Master Apprentice phantomotap's Avatar
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    I'm almost afraid to ask what a "better" solution that doesn't involve explicitly specifying template parameters would be.
    O_o

    It would take you... I'd guess two minutes and 80 characters to simplify the interface for the code manasij7479 posted so that no explicit instantiation would be required and still solves the problem without transforming the stream (by wrapping it).

    In my opinion, it is always better to do something than nothing at all.
    Which begs the question, why are you doing nothing at all?

    Therefore, I put an assert there to remind me that if I did something wrong, I would become reminded.
    That is not the purpose of `assert'. The `assert' function is a debugging aid used by implementations to provide context to client code to make the client code easier to debug. The `assert' doesn't exist for release builds; it can't remind you of something in a release build.

    Using an `assert' for a "precondition" check is a fair example; let's call that example `void example(int f)'. A "precondition" of `example' states that `f' must never be zero. The debug build notifies client code that an error occurs during debug builds only so that client code can position a check for that same precondition at the best possible location as a convenience to the programmer of client code. (This isn't a necessary component of the implementation; it literally exists only to aid the programmers of client code in getting the use of that implementation correct.) The release build does not perform the check because it is a precondition for which client code assumes responsibility. That precondition check doesn't exist to help the implementation of `example' in any way; the code is simply written against the assumption that `f' is never zero.

    The client code is what benefits from the `assert' function. That is an extremely important part of using `assert' correctly. You can't use an `assert' to implement some mechanism because it is not guaranteed to happen.

    We have three choices: ignore it, assert it or throw an exception.
    *smacks Elysia with newspaper*

    No!

    This test:

    Code:
    tmp == literal.GetChar()
    must always be performed and an `NDEBUG' `assert' never performs that test.

    This is a stream operation we are discussing, a primitive designed to process data and return a formatted result. Such operations are by their very nature going to fail even on full (release) builds. You could argue that what you do when that test fails is up for grabs. You could do the test and fail with `abort' (as `assert' very likely would in a debug build). You could through an exception. You could, should, use `failbit' as that is its purpose. But you can't ignore it; the test must be performed otherwise it simply does not do what it claims.

    With an `NDEBUG' `assert' it is exactly equivalent to ignoring one character. No test for proper formatting occurs. That is a clear and obvious violation of the name and its stated purpose.

    [Edit]
    Oh, but GetChar() is a const member function with no side effects, so I guess that's okay here.
    I really wish people would take more than two seconds to read posts other people make.

    It is not "okay"; it is absolutely, spectacularly, completely WRONG!

    The `assert' and therefore the test is compiled out in a release build.

    The code:

    Code:
    int x;
    int y;
    if(cin >> x >> literal('+') >> y)
    {
        cout << "Yay!";
    }
    essentially becomes:

    Code:
    int x;
    int y;
    char ignored;
    if(cin >> x >> ignored >> y)
    {
        cout << "Yay!";
    }
    in a release build.

    Does that sound "Okay."?

    No! It sounds wrong. It is wrong.

    In a release build if I input "1=2" I get a "Yay!" even though that is clearly not what the client code is asking to do. Does that sound "Okay."? Do you want your code to be unaware of an extremely probable user error?

    In a debug build if I input "1=2" I get an application abort. Does that sound "Okay."? Do you want your code crashing because of an extremely probable user error?
    [/Edit]

    Soma
    Last edited by phantomotap; 02-12-2012 at 03:22 AM.

  8. #23
    C++まいる!Cをこわせ! Elysia's Avatar
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    I may agree with you that an assert is not a good thing to use to handle a specific condition. In this case, I chose to not handle the case because I was unsure on how to handle it. So I basically said, "This code requires the precondition that the read char is equal to the one we specified."
    But perhaps that isn't enough? In case I do not handle something, perhaps I should simply throw an exception, throw ErrNotImplemented?

    Just to be clear, I understand your point. It's just that the code was incomplete because I didn't make a decision on how to handle a specific case. That said, what you say, what laserlight's code does and what mana does and says all sound like a very good idea.
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.

  9. #24
    C++ Witch laserlight's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by phantomotap
    It is not "okay"; it is absolutely, spectacularly, completely WRONG!

    The `assert' and therefore the test is compiled out in a release build.
    Having the test compiled out in a release build is okay, insofar as the test is not required as it is expected to always pass. The problem is that the test is required as part of the feature, and is expected to fail in a way that does not constitute a programming error. Unfortunately...

    Quote Originally Posted by phantomotap
    I really wish people would take more than two seconds to read posts other people make.
    Guilty as charged
    I assumed that Elysia was just using the assertion as a debugging tool, since any sane programmer does that.

    Quote Originally Posted by Elysia
    So I basically said, "This code requires the precondition that the read char is equal to the one we specified."
    In that case, you don't need the whole business of passing a specific character. You can just assume that the user input is correct, and do the equivalent of a cin.get() that discards the char read, whatever it is.

    EDIT:
    Furthermore, if you are not going to actually check, then overloading operator>> is a bad idea. It would be better to have an input manipulator that discards n characters read from the stream, i.e., a version of cin.ignore that is a manipulator.
    Last edited by laserlight; 02-12-2012 at 04:41 AM.
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  10. #25
    Master Apprentice phantomotap's Avatar
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    So I basically said, "This code requires the precondition that the read char is equal to the one we specified."
    This issue is exactly what I'm complaining about. That is really not what you've done, but I believe that you think that which is why I ask you not to use `assert'. You are still misunderstanding what `assert' does and what it says to client code. I think you may also misunderstand preconditions.

    Take a moment to understand what you've actually just said and done.

    You have stated:

    "This is function `example'." (This would be the implementation class plus the interface.)
    "Function `example' takes two parameters." (The stream and character literal.)
    "Function `example' processes data." (The function reads from the stream.)
    "A precondition of `example' is that both parameters must be the same." ("the read char is equal to the one we specified")

    The bit in bold is the problem now. The precondition "the read char is equal to the one we specified" is impossible to conform to without processing the data. The problem with that should be clear. That function exists only to do what we would have to do to conform to the precondition.

    Again, I'm not trying to be a jerk. Proper debugging techniques are rarely taught and almost every book intentionally omits checks for the sake of simplicity, brevity, or both.

    In case I do not handle something, perhaps I should simply throw an exception, throw ErrNotImplemented?
    *shrug*

    This is going to be hard to explain, and I may have to come back to this later.

    Basically, you don't not handle it. Ever. I know that sounds unbelievably stupid, but hang on a moment.

    To say "this is an invalid state or sequence" with an `assert' is to graciously provide support to programmers of client code so that they can debug and use an interface correctly by saying, loosely, "Use it correctly or don't use it at all.".

    To say "this is an invalid state or sequence" with an error code (by return value for example) is to say "I can't handle this state or sequence without you making some adjustments.".

    To say "this is an invalid state or sequence" with an exception is to say "I can't handle this state or sequence without more guidance; please find someone to help me.".

    To say "this is an invalid state or sequence" with another claim of "I don't care." is to say "This state or sequence is unfamiliar to me but may not be an issue for you.". (You don't say this with `assert'.)

    Which of these makes the most sense at this point?

    All of these are perfectly reasonable. All of them have a place in the real world. But one way or the other, you have handled it by stating that you "don't care".

    This situation is a really bad example for `assert', exceptions, and "don't care". It is a good example for "return code" (`failbit'). You've seen me post about `assert' a lot on this thread and exceptions elsewhere, but a "don't care" example is lacking; it comes up often enough in numeric approximations and simulations. Simulations can often work just fine and produce usable results even if routines fail to calculate the exact distance correctly. (A postcondition check would try to confirm the results and produce an error if not.)

    Having the test compiled out in a release build is okay, insofar as the test is not required as it is expected to always pass.
    O_o

    The problem is that the test is required as part of the feature, and is expected to fail in a way that does not constitute a programming error.
    o_O

    How did you manage to get "the test is not required" and "the test is required" only two sentences apart?

    *shrug*

    Your stated rationale for both sentences is wrong in any event.

    Saying you expect that test to always pass is the same exact thing as saying you always expect input to be perfectly well formed.

    Consuming a literal value provided by the client code is the feature. That is only and exactly what it claims to do. Without the test it does not consume a literal value provided by the client code; it only consumes and discards input. These two things are not even in the same galaxy.

    You are actually saying that this code:

    Code:
    int lBuffer[1];
    int lIndex;
    int lValue;
    std::cin >> lIndex >> lValue;
    lBuffer[lIndex] = lValue;
    is perfectly reasonable and acceptable.

    Assuming that input is always going to be of the form "<int>+<int>" is the same kind of assumption the above code makes; it assumes input is always going to be of the form "0 <int>". That isn't just a foolish assumption; that is an extremely dangerous assumption as it is those kinds of failures that lead to buffer exploits. Clearly those tests are not optional.

    Soma

  11. #26
    C++まいる!Cをこわせ! Elysia's Avatar
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    So... going by your information, how would one say "This is an invalid sequence, but I haven't been able to decide which of the four above alternatives this sequence corresponds to"?
    Basically, I did not know how to handle it, so I placed a placeholder until I could figure it out. How does one deal with that, then?
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.

  12. #27
    C++ Witch laserlight's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by phantomotap
    How did you manage to get "the test is not required" and "the test is required" only two sentences apart?
    I really wish people would take more than two seconds to read posts other people make.

    The part about the test being not required is a general statement about assertions. The part about the test being required is a statement about this particular code that Elysia wrote. This is indicated by the key word "insofar".

    Quote Originally Posted by phantomotap
    Your stated rationale for both sentences is wrong in any event.
    You are mistaken.

    Quote Originally Posted by phantomotap
    Saying you expect that test to always pass is the same exact thing as saying you always expect input to be perfectly well formed.
    I agree, and that is part of my point in post #24 (input is "expected to fail in a way that does not constitute a programming error"). That's why the assertion is wrongly used, regardless of the value of NDEBUG.

    Quote Originally Posted by phantomotap
    Consuming a literal value provided by the client code is the feature. That is only and exactly what it claims to do. Without the test it does not consume a literal value provided by the client code; it only consumes and discards input. These two things are not even in the same galaxy.
    I agree, and that is part of my point in post #24 ("the test is required as part of the feature"). Basically, you repeated my mistake of not reading carefully, except that this time it is not about code, but about prose.
    Last edited by laserlight; 02-12-2012 at 06:54 AM.
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  13. #28
    Master Apprentice phantomotap's Avatar
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    *sigh*

    I wish I could type as fast as I think... or at least as fast as I read. ;_;

    Anyway...

    So... going by your information, how would one say "This is an invalid sequence, but I haven't been able to decide which of the four above alternatives this sequence corresponds to"?
    ^_^

    Being me, if I could not decide how to handle such a situation upon investigation into the underlying primitives and purpose I would explore it with a facility I have that lets choose between the four based on a compiler flag.

    No, I'm not joking. If all else fails, I explore until I find a solution.

    Basically, I did not know how to handle it, so I placed a placeholder until I could figure it out.
    Yes. I know that now, but I did not realize it at the time.

    How does one deal with that, then?
    There is an infinity number of ways to use all the options correctly. Unfortunately, there is an infinite number of way to use all the options incorrectly.

    I deal with it the same way I approach everything else. I explore and I seek out others who have explored before me.

    *sigh*

    I really wish I was joking, but I'm not. My vast experience being wrong gives me great insight to being right. In time, if you get it wrong often enough and learn from those mistakes, you develop the mental flowchart to help you choose which approach is probably best.

    The best advice I can give you: pick out a library (any library you haven't used), find problems with how and when the interface reports error conditions, and try and fix those problems. It is easier to see problems in an interface designed by others.

    If you were me you could look at your own code, but most people aren't nearly as harsh with themselves as I am.

    Soma

  14. #29
    Master Apprentice phantomotap's Avatar
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    I really wish people would take more than two seconds to read posts other people make.
    O_o

    This is indicated by the key word "insofar".
    Actually, it isn't. Let's take my look at that statement again using the insofar definition.

    Having the test compiled out in a release build is okay, to such extent that the test is not required as it is expected to always pass.
    I read that as:

    Having the test compiled out in a release build is okay<comma> to such extent that the test is not required as it is expected to always pass.
    And so I infer:

    Having the test compiled out in a release build is okay<comma> it can be ascertained that the test is not required as it is expected to always pass.
    And so I read that as affirming the use of `assert' to catch some bizarre condition that violates that expectation.

    Basically, you repeated my mistake of not reading carefully, except that this time it is not about code, but about prose.
    *shrug*

    You say I read that wrong; so be it. If I read that wrong and you didn't "just" say "the test compiled out in a release build is okay" in the context of the use of `assert' in question the rest of my response relating to your odd and "wrong" opinion is not relevant because I framed my interpretation of the other statements on those two.

    Basically, you repeated my mistake of not reading carefully, except that this time it is not about code, but about prose.
    And how wonderful it is that code isn't so open to interpretation.

    Soma

  15. #30
    C++ Witch laserlight's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by phantomotap
    And so I infer:
    Having the test compiled out in a release build is okay<comma> it can be ascertained that the test is not required as it is expected to always pass.
    And so I read that as affirming the use of `assert' to catch some bizarre condition that violates that expectation.
    O_o

    I find it bizarre that you inferred certainty from "to such extent".

    Since the next sentence states that the test is expected to fail, maybe it is almost as if I managed to catch you with a "garden path" pair of sentences, heh.

    Quote Originally Posted by phantomotap
    And how wonderful it is that code isn't so open to interpretation.
    Except when it is, like Elysia's "I put an assertion here as a placeholder until further notice" kind of thing

    Anyway, is anyone interested in seeing this functionality, whether as input manipulator or as operator>> overloads, added to the C++ standard?
    C + C++ Compiler: MinGW port of GCC
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