Text Encoder/ Decoder in C++

This is a discussion on Text Encoder/ Decoder in C++ within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; Yo, I currently have a project for my (Basic) Computer programming class which consists of making a simple Text Encoder/Decoder. ...

  1. #1
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    Text Encoder/ Decoder in C++

    Yo, I currently have a project for my (Basic) Computer programming class which consists of making a simple Text Encoder/Decoder.

    It'll read text from a file (named as "input.txt"), transformed/encoded using an encoding algorithm (to be created by me.) and saved into another file (named as "output.txt"). The decoder is simply this process in reverse only with the file named as "decoded.txt".

    The problem I'm facing is I have no idea how an encoding algorithm (as well as the script that allows the encoder/decoder to read from the file) works or is made. This past term was literally my first experience with C++.

    So far, here's what I've managed to come up with: (Note: I'm using Bloodshed Dev-C++)

    Code:
    #include <math.h>
    #include <stdio.h>
    #include <conio.h>
    #include <stdlib.h> // The libraries
    
    int main(){
        
        int option; // Variable for selection.
        
        printf("Select a Number to select a Function\n"); // The choices and selection.
        printf("1. Encode\n");
        printf("2. Decode\n");
        printf("3. Close\n\n");
        scanf("%i",&option);
        
        switch(option){case 1: printf("\nYOU SHALL ENCODE!"); // Placeholder for Encoding script
                       break;
                       case 2: printf("\nYOU SHALL DECODE!"); // Placeholder for Decoding script
                       break;
                       case 3: printf("\nPress any key to continue."); // Script for cancellation.
                       break;
                       default: printf("\nINVALID, TRY AGAIN NEXT TIME.");
                       }
        
        getch();}
    Any form of advice or tutorials (which a complete idiot could understand XD) would be much appreciated.

    Regards,

    Joe

    C++ Programming neophyte

  2. #2
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    the basic idea is that you apply some sort of transformation to the plain text - xor for example - that when applied to the encoded text, gives the original plain text.

    on a side note: dev-C++ is ANCIENT in terms of develpment environments. get code::blocks or eclipse or MSVC++ Express

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    Have a look at XOR cipher - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Very simple algorithm; in order to encrypt, do a xor on each byte of your text and store that result. In order to de-crypt, again do xor's with same value on every byte of the previously encrypted text et voila...

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    Right, I'll take a look at them later. (I have Finals today, so yeah.)

    @Elkvis: I'll keep that in mind when I get LBYEC72, which would be two terms from now. (The next course after this course I'm taking.)

  6. #6
    C++まいる!Cをこわせ! Elysia's Avatar
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    Did you accidentally post this in the wrong section?
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.

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    No I didn't, I originally had no idea how to go about things but now I have an inkling as to how to do it.

    My only problem now is the encryption part of the program. (and the subsequent writing into another file.)

  8. #8
    C++まいる!Cをこわせ! Elysia's Avatar
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    Then how come you posted C in C++?
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.

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    That was C? I didn't know. :/

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    spurious conceit MK27's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe_Allen View Post
    That was C?
    Yep. The most significant difference is in the #includes at the top -- those are C library includes. The C++ library uses slightly different versions of those:

    Code:
    #include <cmath>
    #include <cstdio>
    #include <conio.h> // dunno about this one
    #include <cstdlib>
    These allow you to use the standard C functions you are using in a C++ program (notice the form: stdio.h = cstdio, etc). You should not use a C++ compiler with the other headers; altho in practice they are nearly identical and so work, there could be slight differences which will lead to problems.

    All I know about conio.h is that it is from a (non-standard) Borland C library originally for MS-DOS. It may work fine with a C++ compiler, but then again, it may not. Unless you know you need it for something, just leave it out.

    Of course, if you are looking to learn C++, you might want to use native C++ stuff from <iostream>, like cout, instead of printf from <cstdio>.
    Last edited by MK27; 12-15-2011 at 05:42 AM.
    C programming resources:
    GNU C Function and Macro Index -- glibc reference manual
    The C Book -- nice online learner guide
    Current ISO draft standard
    CCAN -- new CPAN like open source library repository
    3 (different) GNU debugger tutorials: #1 -- #2 -- #3
    cpwiki -- our wiki on sourceforge

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    Please don't use Conio.h!

    Its a horrible, horrible thing, and it'll leave you with no friends.

  12. #12
    and the hat of wrongness Salem's Avatar
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    > That was C? I didn't know. :/
    Isn't it a bit late in the course to discover that you've been learning the wrong language?

    If your tutor has just been feeding you stuff on the basis "well it compiles", then you need to get your money back!
    If you dance barefoot on the broken glass of undefined behaviour, you've got to expect the occasional cut.
    If at first you don't succeed, try writing your phone number on the exam paper.
    I support http://www.ukip.org/ as the first necessary step to a free Europe.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe_Allen View Post
    Yo, I currently have a project for my (Basic) Computer programming class which consists of making a simple Text Encoder/Decoder.

    It'll read text from a file (named as "input.txt"), transformed/encoded using an encoding algorithm (to be created by me.) and saved into another file (named as "output.txt"). The decoder is simply this process in reverse only with the file named as "decoded.txt".

    The problem I'm facing is I have no idea how an encoding algorithm (as well as the script that allows the encoder/decoder to read from the file) works or is made. This past term was literally my first experience with C++.

    So far, here's what I've managed to come up with: (Note: I'm using Bloodshed Dev-C++)

    Code:
    #include <math.h>
    #include <stdio.h>
    #include <conio.h>
    #include <stdlib.h> // The libraries
    
    int main(){
        
        int option; // Variable for selection.
        
        printf("Select a Number to select a Function\n"); // The choices and selection.
        printf("1. Encode\n");
        printf("2. Decode\n");
        printf("3. Close\n\n");
        scanf("%i",&option);
        
        switch(option){case 1: printf("\nYOU SHALL ENCODE!"); // Placeholder for Encoding script
                       break;
                       case 2: printf("\nYOU SHALL DECODE!"); // Placeholder for Decoding script
                       break;
                       case 3: printf("\nPress any key to continue."); // Script for cancellation.
                       break;
                       default: printf("\nINVALID, TRY AGAIN NEXT TIME.");
                       }
        
        getch();}
    Any form of advice or tutorials (which a complete idiot could understand XD) would be much appreciated.

    Regards,

    Joe

    C++ Programming neophyte
    It's been said before, but this is "C". The easiest way to tell is that all standard headers require the .h extension (only non-standard in c++) and that you are using print/scanf instead of cin/out.

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