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sort with vector pointers

This is a discussion on sort with vector pointers within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; Code: bool MySort(CModel* entity1 , CModel* entity2) { return entity1->m_pDiffuseMap < entity2->m_pDiffuseMap; } std::sort (m_modelvector.begin(), m_modelvector.end(), MySort); m_modelvector is vector ...

  1. #1
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    Question sort with vector pointers

    Code:
    bool MySort(CModel* entity1 , CModel* entity2)
    {
            return entity1->m_pDiffuseMap < entity2->m_pDiffuseMap;
    
    }
    
    
    
    std::sort (m_modelvector.begin(), m_modelvector.end(), MySort);
    m_modelvector is
    vector <CModel*> m_modelvector;


    im getting these errors


    : error C3867: 'CRenderManager::MySort': function call missing argument list; use '&CRenderManager::MySort' to create a pointer to member

    : error C2780: 'void std::sort(_RanIt,_RanIt)' : expects 2 arguments - 3 provided

    i know its some thing stupid , but just cant figure it out , any one help please?

  2. #2
    C++ Witch laserlight's Avatar
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    I'm guessing that you declared MySort as a member function of CModel. It may make more sense to declare it as a non-member function, or maybe a static member function. (And rename it, since it compares, not sorts.)
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  3. #3
    'Allo, 'Allo, Allo
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    Hey look, the same answer you got yesterday. If you don't understand the response, perhaps you should ask for clarification rather than jumping from forum to forum hoping someone will answer it in simpler terms.

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    tryed making a it a static and got exact same thing

  5. #5
    C++ Witch laserlight's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by thedodgeruk
    tryed making a it a static and got exact same thing
    On the other hand, I tried making it a static member function and did not get the same thing:
    Code:
    #include <vector>
    #include <algorithm>
    
    class CModel
    {
    public:
        CModel() : m_pDiffuseMap(0) {}
    
        static bool MySort(CModel* entity1 , CModel* entity2)
        {
            return entity1->m_pDiffuseMap < entity2->m_pDiffuseMap;
        }
    private:
        int m_pDiffuseMap;
    };
    
    int main()
    {
        std::vector<CModel*> m_modelvector(100);
        std::sort(m_modelvector.begin(), m_modelvector.end(), CModel::MySort);
    }
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  6. #6
    and the hat of wrongness Salem's Avatar
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  7. #7
    C++まいる!Cをこわせ!
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    Laser, are you sure there should not be a & before the function in your example?
    As in,
    &CModel::MySort
    instead of
    CModel::MySort
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Elysia View Post
    Laser, are you sure there should not be a & before the function in your example?
    As in,
    &CModel::MySort
    instead of
    CModel::MySort
    It's optional. You don't need & when taking the address of a function.
    It is too clear and so it is hard to see.
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  9. #9
    C++まいる!Cをこわせ!
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    But it's different with a member function.
    EDIT: I suppose it's different with static member functions. VC compiles without the ampersand.
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.

  10. #10
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    cheers , it looks like is the same thing as templates , dont seam to like it when you put them in the cpp file

  11. #11
    C++まいる!Cをこわせ!
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    You should not put templates in .cpp files. Write them inline and store them in headers.
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.

  12. #12
    Algorithm Dissector iMalc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by thedodgeruk View Post
    cheers , it looks like is the same thing as templates , dont seam to like it when you put them in the cpp file
    One can put class static methods in a cpp file just fine.
    You must have gotten the syntax wrong.
    Post the code you tried and we'll show you what you did wrong.
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