Any tool to find all include from a given c++ file?

This is a discussion on Any tool to find all include from a given c++ file? within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; Does anyone know of any tools that will output all the included files from a given c++ file? A lot ...

  1. #1
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    Any tool to find all include from a given c++ file?

    Does anyone know of any tools that will output all the included files from a given c++ file? A lot of times headers include other headers. So when you see #include x it may actually be including a, b, and c too.

  2. #2
    'Allo, 'Allo, Allo
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    'cl /showIncludes file.cpp' for Visual Studio, I'm sure GCC has something similar

  3. #3
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    I remember writing this tool a while ago. It was pretty trivial. I can't find it anymore, though.

  4. #4
    C++ Junkie Mozza314's Avatar
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    Quick and dirty. Ignores files without a period so that standard headers are ignored. Also assumes all files are in the current directory (doesn't implement include path lookup stuff). If you actually want to use it I'll probably put a path lookup in there (or feel free to do it yourself :-P).

    Code:
    #include <cassert>
    #include <cstdlib>
    #include <fstream>
    #include <iostream>
    #include <list>
    #include <string>
    
    void ShowIncludes(const std::string& filename, std::list<std::string>& includes);
    
    int main(int argc, char** argv)
    {
        if (argc != 2)
        {
            std::cerr << "Usage: " << argv[0] << " filename" << std::endl;
            return 0;
        }
    
        std::list<std::string> includes;
        ShowIncludes(argv[1], includes);
    
        includes.sort();
    
        for (std::list<std::string>::iterator it = includes.begin(); it != includes.end(); ++it)
            std::cout << *it << std::endl;
    
        return 0;
    }
    
    void ShowIncludes(const std::string& filename, std::list<std::string>& includes)
    {
        std::ifstream ifs(filename.c_str());
    
        if (!ifs.good())
        {
            std::cerr << "Couldn't open " << filename << std::endl;
            exit(1);
        }
    
        std::string line;
        getline(ifs, line);
        while (!ifs.eof())
        {
            if (line.size() >= 12 && line[0] == '#')
            {
                int start = 1;
                while (start < line.size() && line[start] == ' ')
                    ++start;
    
                bool couldBeInclude = true;
                for (int i = 0; i != 7 && couldBeInclude; ++i)
                    couldBeInclude &= (line[start + i] == "include"[i]);
    
                if (couldBeInclude)
                {
                    int fileStart = start + 7;
                    while (fileStart < line.size() && line[fileStart] == ' ')
                        ++fileStart;
    
                    assert(fileStart < line.size());
                    assert(line[fileStart] == '"' || line[fileStart] == '<');
                    ++fileStart;
    
                    int fileEnd = fileStart;
                    bool dotFound = false;
                    while (fileEnd < line.size() && line[fileEnd] != '"' && line[fileEnd] != '>')
                    {
                        dotFound |= (line[fileEnd] == '.');
                        ++fileEnd;
                    }
    
                    assert(fileEnd < line.size());
                    assert(line[fileEnd] == '"' || line[fileEnd] == '>');
    
                    if (dotFound) // ignore standard headers that don't have a period in them
                    {
                        line[fileEnd] = '\0';
                        includes.push_back(&line[fileStart]);
                        ShowIncludes(includes.back(), includes);
                    }
                }
            }
    
            getline(ifs, line);
        }
    }
    I just realised you can take advantage of the preprocessor for this and if you're on linux you can also use grep and such to do this quite easily:

    Code:
    g++ -E $1 |\
        grep '^# [0-9]* "[^"]*"' |\
        grep -o '"[^"]*"' |\
        grep -o '[^"<>]*' |\
        grep -v '^/usr/' |\
        sort |\
        uniq
    Last edited by Mozza314; 04-01-2011 at 06:59 PM.

  5. #5
    and the hat of sweating
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    Use the -H option to compile your code in g++:
    Preprocessor Options - Using the GNU Compiler Collection (GCC)
    "I am probably the laziest programmer on the planet, a fact with which anyone who has ever seen my code will agree." - esbo, 11/15/2008

    "the internet is a scary place to be thats why i dont use it much." - billet, 03/17/2010

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