Mathematical ability and C/C++

This is a discussion on Mathematical ability and C/C++ within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; VB sucks. It generates bloaty, stupid, slow and large code. It doesn't support pointers. There is no inline assembler. Unsigned ...

  1. #31
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Posts
    164
    VB sucks. It generates bloaty, stupid, slow and large code. It doesn't support pointers. There is no inline assembler. Unsigned variables above 8-bit are not supported. No 64-bit support. Uses runtime-dlls which are very large. You can't use classes properly. Arrays have stupid slow headers inside them which takes memory. Most calculations are using floating-point code when not needed. Bit operators uses functions instead of op-codes. I can continue forever!!
    // Gliptic

  2. #32
    Registered User UneducatedOne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Posts
    57
    hmmm, $600 - $700 wasted then?

  3. #33
    Registered User UneducatedOne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Posts
    57
    VB is just another "dialect" of C/C++?
    Harder than normal C++?
    What is it?

    ^^

  4. #34
    Registered User UneducatedOne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Posts
    57
    Whats the going price for a good C++ book?

  5. #35
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Posts
    164
    VB is not a dialect of C++. It's another language derived from the BASIC language which existed before C++ did. It is however a restricted language, both BASIC and Visual Basic, but it's made to make development fast without the good results other languages can achieve. If you're looking for an easy, fast written language, you might try Delphi.
    // Gliptic

  6. #36
    Unregistered
    Guest
    >>> VB is not a dialect of C++. It's another language derived from the BASIC language which existed before C++ did. It is however a restricted language.
    __________________________________________________ __
    resticted?, what do you mean?
    oh, also, is delphi similar to C++, or is it alot easier?

    thanks

  7. #37
    Unregistered
    Guest
    Restrictions in BASIC/VB:

    * No unsigned variables above 8-bits and no 8-bit signed variables.

    * Pointers can't be used

    * No inline assembler (maybe QBasic has this. Dont know)

    * No bitshift operators

    * Windows APIs are called via another function

    * Subclassing is dangerous

    * No real classes

    * You can't access byte positions in arrays, variables etc. without using CopyMemory or any other function


    That's all I can think of now. I'm sure there is plenty of more things.

  8. #38
    Unregistered
    Guest
    I see, why would people learn/use VB then?, is it for graphics?
    and BASIC..is that for graphics?, or are they just normal C++ programming "tools/programs"?

  9. #39
    Registered User UneducatedOne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Posts
    57
    Also, whats the best compiler to use?
    I'm currently using DevC++, but I've heard all the hype about the Borland v5.5 C++ compiler and that it's the best freeware version anyone can get?
    true?
    thoughts?
    comments?

  10. #40
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    154
    Originally posted by Unregistered
    I see, why would people learn/use VB then?, is it for graphics?
    and BASIC..is that for graphics?, or are they just normal C++ programming "tools/programs"?
    I think VB is written in C++. It's a way to write programs, particularly Windows programs, more quickly and with an easier to use interface. It lacks a lot of the versatility and power of C++, but because of its ease and speed of use, is popular in developing many applications.

  11. #41
    Registered User UneducatedOne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Posts
    57
    So, a compiler strictly for windows huh?
    does it use dos at all?

  12. #42
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    154
    Originally posted by UneducatedOne
    So, a compiler strictly for windows huh?
    does it use dos at all?
    No, I don't mean it's a windows only compiler. Maybe it is, that I don't know. When it starts up, there's a blank form on the screen that's a simple window you can modify in various ways, such as by adding elements like scroll bars, command buttons, minimize & maximize boxes, etc. That is the window a user sees.
    I think msvc++ has something similar available, but it has a wide variety of other options as well. Borland or the other C compilers I've never seen, so don't know about them. As far as I know, only Microsoft makes VB, so they do windows. If you first see VB, then move to VC, you wonder where the Visual in the C.

  13. #43
    Registered User UneducatedOne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Posts
    57
    Yah, also, I'm currently using the Bloodshed DevC++ compiler, is this a decent compiler?
    I've been told by numerous people that the Borland C++ compiler is much better, even the DGJPP is better, as far as i've been told...

    true?
    thoughts?
    comments?

  14. #44
    Registered User UneducatedOne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Posts
    57
    Oh also, I forgot, I could also get MSVB, would be the best to get?


    ~

  15. #45
    Unregistered
    Guest
    As being one of the people oppressed by the public school system by not being allowed to start in a Computer Science program until I had 3 High School credits in math, I would like to say that schools seem to push kids away from technology. In both of the High Schools I've attended they assign technology classes the worst teachers imaginable. They need to do more seperating among the classes. They teach classes either way above most kids, or way below. An example would be the fact that every single student in my Electrical Engineering class failed as the result of the teacher assuming we all knew everything about everything concerning electronics. Another example would be the sorry excuse of a Networking/Web Design class I am in. The teacher teaches us nothing. I think the reason for the lack of good teachers is that industry pays a lot better than teaching does, and so potential teachers go to work for comapanies. We need better technology teachers.

Page 3 of 7 FirstFirst 1234567 LastLast
Popular pages Recent additions subscribe to a feed

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21