design pattern for information manager?

This is a discussion on design pattern for information manager? within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; Dear there, my development of a numerical application involves lots of data, and various modules. Using traditional array to pass ...

  1. #1
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    design pattern for information manager?

    Dear there, my development of a numerical application involves lots of data, and various modules. Using traditional array to pass data between routines and modules have been tedious. I always forget where I stored the data, or what a specific data means after several months development. It seems that I need a central storage for everything (a bad idea?) However design such a central storage is nontrivial beforehand. I would like to see a similar case and a mature pattern for handling this situation.

    I am even thinking of embedding SQLite into my development, and use tables for all information storage and exchange. However it seems nontraditional and performance not known. A mature patter would be better.

    Any suggestion?

  2. #2
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    sounds like you just haven't implemented OOP very well.

  3. #3
    and the hat of sweating
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    If you're forgetting where you put data, maybe you need to document your code better and use UML diagrams to help keep things in perspective?
    "I am probably the laziest programmer on the planet, a fact with which anyone who has ever seen my code will agree." - esbo, 11/15/2008

    "the internet is a scary place to be thats why i dont use it much." - billet, 03/17/2010

  4. #4
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    I'd suggest a getting a book on design patterns.

    Also, try to put extra thought into naming things. It should be easy to understand what each method does by it's name. Add comments where it is not perfectly clear.
    It is too clear and so it is hard to see.
    A dunce once searched for fire with a lighted lantern.
    Had he known what fire was,
    He could have cooked his rice much sooner.

  5. #5
    Ugly C Lover audinue's Avatar
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    Never, never, never try to use any design pattern until you design your software.

    I am even thinking of embedding SQLite into my development, and use tables for all information storage and exchange. However it seems nontraditional and performance not known. A mature patter would be better.
    That is such low level manner (implementations thingy) and not about modeling.
    Just GET it OFF out my mind!!

  6. #6
    Captain Crash brewbuck's Avatar
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    Large, complex data sets are, well... large and complex. You aren't going to find a design pattern that magically makes complexity disappear.

    If you're having trouble remembering where certain data is stored, you probably just aren't naming things well enough.
    Code:
    //try
    //{
    	if (a) do { f( b); } while(1);
    	else   do { f(!b); } while(1);
    //}

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