Borland C++ vs Microsoft C++

This is a discussion on Borland C++ vs Microsoft C++ within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; Hi all, Sorry for the silly question, but which is the most popular enviroment for windows, easiest to use and ...

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    Registered User RocketMan's Avatar
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    Borland C++ vs Microsoft C++

    Hi all,

    Sorry for the silly question, but which is the most popular enviroment for windows, easiest to use and why?

    Regards,

    Rocketman

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    Most popular is Visual Studio by Microsoft. Easiest to use is subjective, and different people will have different opinions. Note that there are more options than just Borland and Microsoft.
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    Malum in se abachler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RocketMan View Post
    Hi all,

    Sorry for the silly question, but which is the most popular enviroment for windows, easiest to use and why?

    Regards,

    Rocketman
    If you ask 2 programmers what is the 'best' you will get 3 opinions.
    Until you can build a working general purpose reprogrammable computer out of basic components from radio shack, you are not fit to call yourself a programmer in my presence. This is cwhizard, signing off.

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    and the Hat of Guessing tabstop's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by abachler View Post
    If you ask 2 programmers what is the 'best' you will get 3 opinions.
    And that's only if they agree.

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    Malum in se abachler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tabstop View Post
    And that's only if they agree.
    roflmao
    Until you can build a working general purpose reprogrammable computer out of basic components from radio shack, you are not fit to call yourself a programmer in my presence. This is cwhizard, signing off.

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    Aha! You have left out the truly best answer: GCC for Windows. All other compilers are inferior in every possible way....*ducks*

    In all seriousness, if I were developing for Windows, I'd probably stick with MSVC, or possibly the Intel C++ compiler.

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    Registered User RocketMan's Avatar
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    Hi all,

    Thanks for your input.

    Ok its going to be microsoft visual c++. Im currently conversant with C, and am just about to jump into windows C++. I currently have a good C++ book. What book do you recommended for the window framework? And lastly C++.net or C++ MFC, for a newbie to window programming?

    Regards,

    Rocketman

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    Malum in se abachler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RocketMan View Post
    Hi all,

    Thanks for your input.

    Ok its going to be microsoft visual c++. Im currently conversant with C, and am just about to jump into windows C++. I currently have a good C++ book. What book do you recommended for the window framework? And lastly C++.net or C++ MFC, for a newbie to window programming?

    Regards,

    Rocketman
    Petzold is the de facto standard for Win32 - ISBN 978-1-57231-995-0
    for MFC its Prosise - ISBN 1-57231-695-0

    Both sort of require you to already know C++ though, so for C++ I'm recommending 0-13-042888-4
    It's pre C99 standard but I don't know of any conflicts.
    Last edited by abachler; 10-01-2009 at 03:26 PM.
    Until you can build a working general purpose reprogrammable computer out of basic components from radio shack, you are not fit to call yourself a programmer in my presence. This is cwhizard, signing off.

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    Dae
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    Quote Originally Posted by abachler View Post
    Petzold is the de facto standard for Win32 - ISBN 978-1-57231-995-0
    for MFC its Prosise - ISBN 1-57231-695-0

    Both sort of require you to already know C++ though, so for C++ I'm recommending 0-13-042888-4
    It's pre C99 standard but I don't know of any conflicts.
    Thanks abachler.


    Not for the book recommendation, but for not attaching picture proof.
    Warning: Have doubt in anything I post.

    GCC 4.5, Boost 1.40, Code::Blocks 8.02, Ubuntu 9.10 010001000110000101100101

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    Note that Microsoft has a free version of their most recent IDEs (which you should prefer over their older versions). I'm assuming you'd be using the old Borland IDE rather than the current, non-free stuff based off of it, and I wouldn't recommend the old Borland stuff at all for learning windows programming.

    Personally, for windows programming I might learn C#, but if you want to use C++ I'd prefer MFC over .NET. I'm not sure if the free version of the VC++ IDE comes with MFC, though.

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    Quote Originally Posted by abachler View Post
    Petzold is the de facto standard for Win32 - ISBN 978-1-57231-995-0
    for MFC its Prosise - ISBN 1-57231-695-0

    Both sort of require you to already know C++ though, so for C++ I'm recommending 0-13-042888-4
    It's pre C99 standard but I don't know of any conflicts.
    Actually, the Petzold book doesn't require any C++ knowledge. The entire book is in C if I remember correctly.
    bit∙hub [bit-huhb] n. A source and destination for information.

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    Cat without Hat CornedBee's Avatar
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    .Net requires you to program in C++/CLI, which is a nice language, but not really C++.
    MFC is just a horror to work with IMO.

    Go with Qt or wxWidgets.
    All the buzzt!
    CornedBee

    "There is not now, nor has there ever been, nor will there ever be, any programming language in which it is the least bit difficult to write bad code."
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    Malum in se abachler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bithub View Post
    Actually, the Petzold book doesn't require any C++ knowledge. The entire book is in C if I remember correctly.
    Well, a quick scan didn't reveal any C++ only stuff, so you are probably correct.
    Until you can build a working general purpose reprogrammable computer out of basic components from radio shack, you are not fit to call yourself a programmer in my presence. This is cwhizard, signing off.

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    Quote Originally Posted by abachler View Post
    roflmao
    Totally agreed! lol. Use whatever you find most effective. I like Visual Studio but it all comes down to a matter of preference (e.g., why would you like Linux over Windows and vice versa, PC over Mac and vice versa).

    The Visual Studio Express editions mentioned above do not include MFC (this might be it's most endearing quality) or ATL and they are streamlined (I use the term loosely) for non-professional programmers. Basically, they do what most non professional programmers need them to do. You have your debugger, IDE and a few tools to help you along the way. The interface is generally clean and the MSDN library is about as technical as you can get.

    I've used a number of IDE's and I can say without a doubt if you're going for something free and you're not concerned about developing cross-platform VSE is the IDE you should really consider.

    However, Code::Blocks is pretty good and the projects are compatible across all platforms for which Code::Blocks is available. It also uses GCC/MinGW compilers so you should see pretty similar results across platforms.

    I would highly highly highly recommend against dev-c++ as it hasn't been updated in, what, 10 years or so? So just don't even bother.

    I used Borland C++ 5 years ago. I can't say anything about its current usability/simplicity as I left BC++ long ago for GCC and MSVC.
    - Leeor

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    Quote Originally Posted by CornedBee View Post
    Qt or wxWidgets.
    I definitely agree with the wxWidgets. you can use qt, but if you want to develop any commercial software with it, you have to pay trolltech or risk legal action.

    I prefer ms visual studio on windows, with netbeans/mingw being a close second. if you're going to go the netbeans/mingw route, upgrade to the latest version of gcc for mingw, as the one that comes in the installer package is old and buggy.

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