I like C and C++, i just dont like my teacher teaching it...

This is a discussion on I like C and C++, i just dont like my teacher teaching it... within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; to be honest hes not even teaching a damn thing, hes there giving questions or an activity every meeting then ...

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    I like C and C++, i just dont like my teacher teaching it...

    to be honest hes not even teaching a damn thing, hes there giving questions or an activity every meeting then grade us on what progress we made.

    I ask him 1 time out loud... sir!? can you give us a simple class where you teach us and not giving out lots of stuff that only waste our time cuz we never ever tackled the lesson before!?

    he replied, you have tackled the lesson before, but it was on C and you must transpose you ideas from C to C++... the class went silent and i sat down angry.

    i love C and C++ but the thing is my teacher wont give a damn, i was planning to ask someone to teach me well in C++.

    my previous teacher who was teaching C was a female and comparing to my new male teacher they are a whole lot different... my female teacher cares for us willing to take time for us all to understand, but even without effort, by teaching us in the black white board alone we were able to understand very clearly.

    i really like for her to be my teacher, but she moved away cuz she was going to get married. Congrats for her. Too bad for us.

    I really would like for someone in here who is willing to lend some time to teach me the basics of C++, i really want to know about C++.

    I read books, useless... i tried the internet, still useless. its a lot different if you have someone to talk to and have something to come up with. other than my new teacher who is not even trying hard to teach us anything just make an activity for us to code...

    come on... i beg people in here please teach me C++... because of my new teacher i'm beginning to hate C++ and C again...

    would anyone help me please?

    ~ Jazzglenn

  2. #2
    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jazzglenn421 View Post
    I read books, useless...
    What are you talking about? Probably the one best way to learn.

    There's a sticky thread in here with all sorts of book recommendations. Personally I can see no better than C++ Primer by Lippman et all (do not confuse with C++ Primer Plus).
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

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    This isn't really a place to find tutors. There is a book recommendation thread, perhaps it has better books than you found yourself.
    It is too clear and so it is hard to see.
    A dunce once searched for fire with a lighted lantern.
    Had he known what fire was,
    He could have cooked his rice much sooner.

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    Guest Sebastiani's Avatar
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    Why rely on others? If you really want to learn C++ (or anything, really) you should first "learn" to be your own teacher. Collect all of the reference materials you can find on the subject. Study and practice constantly. Challenge yourself regularly.

    I've never taken a programming class. I started with a single book and read it front to back several times. Once I had enough confidence I tried out a few things and just kept at it. Little by little you gain proficiency and expertise.

    I'm not saying there's no value in learning from others, mind you, just that your first aim should always be self-sufficiency.

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    i guess a really good book is the only way to know much better... tnx guys really... i think i should go and take a very good book at the library and start reading...

    from what i learned for today, you cant depend on teachers alone, sometimes a good book can take you a long shot.

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    Registered User bobbinator's Avatar
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    I can be your tutor, only for the very basic c++, up to object orientated stuff
    Im already teaching someone else, how much do you know?

    (ps, my ICQ number is 575-481-100. ICQ is a good program for instant chats)

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    Dae
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    I know where you're coming from jazzglenn421. If it's college and you aren't on scholarship, if it's possible, I'd skip most of the classes (flames?), pick up the coursework, and ace the exams.

    Books are great for learning. Trying to practically apply what you've learned is the best lesson. Teaching itself teaches you a lot. Once you've learned enough, working with someone else on a project could be good practice. Hence work groups.

    You might find some more applicable webcasts/lectures online.. PM me if you bookmarks.

    Good luck..
    Warning: Have doubt in anything I post.

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    The larch
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    I'm not sure. If you find everything so useless (and are essentially searching for another noob to tutor you, because who else would do that? ), may-be you are the problem, and you will not ace the exams.

    You mostly learn by doing. Your teacher should be giving some guidance, but you should also be able to figure out answers to your particular problems from other sources.
    I might be wrong.

    Thank you, anon. You sure know how to recognize different types of trees from quite a long way away.
    Quoted more than 1000 times (I hope).

  9. #9
    Malum in se abachler's Avatar
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    Until you can build a working general purpose reprogrammable computer out of basic components from radio shack, you are not fit to call yourself a programmer in my presence. This is cwhizard, signing off.

  10. #10
    i've lost my mind
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    I learned C++ on this website and cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/ many years ago. Now I'm incredibly comfortable with C and C++ and have moved on to use it to study math and physics.

    You don't need anything other than this website's resources and forum.

    The only thing that kept me in to it however was not just having the resources but goals to achieve. I wanted to understand network programming better back when I was a lot younger, from there I wanted to understand GPU programming, so I was constantly developing better and better games. The most important things were the most subtle, truly appreciating and understanding design patterns and various data structures.

    Actually, if you pick up discrete mathematics while you're at it you will learn to develop such an objective view of computer programming that the differences and intentions of languages begin to really make sense, suddenly every language looks the same with a different dialect.

    blablablabla...
    Last edited by gltiich; 09-09-2009 at 11:21 AM.

  11. #11
    Malum in se abachler's Avatar
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    I've noticed that people that learn C/C++ so they can be programmers tend to have a much harder time of it than 'hobbyist's' that learn C/C++ so they can solve some particular need.
    Until you can build a working general purpose reprogrammable computer out of basic components from radio shack, you are not fit to call yourself a programmer in my presence. This is cwhizard, signing off.

  12. #12
    C++まいる!Cをこわせ!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sebastiani View Post
    Why rely on others? If you really want to learn C++ (or anything, really) you should first "learn" to be your own teacher. Collect all of the reference materials you can find on the subject. Study and practice constantly. Challenge yourself regularly.

    I've never taken a programming class. I started with a single book and read it front to back several times. Once I had enough confidence I tried out a few things and just kept at it. Little by little you gain proficiency and expertise.

    I'm not saying there's no value in learning from others, mind you, just that your first aim should always be self-sufficiency.
    While they "may" be an ideal approach, it may not work for all. First of all, it discourages people. It's not easy and often no fun. I know myself.
    Generally, a class is basically a book + somewhere to ask questions + get a grade. So if you pick up a good book, use this forum to ask questions (and do some homework!), you'll learn it in no time.
    The people are are incredibly knowledgeable about C/C++, often more so than professors/teachers.

    Another book that I've found very good and that lets you get started quickly is Accelerated C++.
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.

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