New to C++, not coded in years, ex C64 6502 / Amiga MC6800 coder here!

This is a discussion on New to C++, not coded in years, ex C64 6502 / Amiga MC6800 coder here! within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; I have been doing a bit on C++ and it's good to see that it will come in usefull for ...

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    Wink New to C++, not coded in years, ex C64 6502 / Amiga MC6800 coder here!

    I have been doing a bit on C++ and it's good to see that it will come in usefull for when I need a particualr piece of code to run very fast. Of course things like line draws, vector faces and maybe even face sorting into draw order(though if it uses a bucket sort.... I can improve, but surely not after all these years....) are now handled by the hardware but I know theres always parts that could help a lot from some assembler, and it's easy to do with C++.

    When I started assembler I do admit to buying an all in one editor and assembler. When I got good, I used a Public Domain(free) util called Asm1. Never took to Seka.

    Whats the best(IYO) package or even seperate C++ editor, compiler/assembler. I hear Microsoft Visual Studio is good and free and I cannot find that, maybe I should look harder. Is there anything else or something good at picking up stupid newbie C++ syntax mistakes.

    Do all librarys come as a collection, how does that work? Do I need to buy a load of books of books and learn the functions of all these librarys or includes?

    C++ seems a piece of cake to how I remember it... the programming seems easy anyway(if you see what I mean). Really though, I don't see what the fuss is about. I am pretty excited but at the same time I know with the PC I have a **** load of system architecture to work with. I have to learn to A LOT about this and obviously a fair bit about working with Windows.

    On the Amiga, I used my own bootloader, wrote my own DMA loader(and private util to also write to tracks) to load other modules of code/sound/gfx/misc data, everything was in memory where I put it, I hardly wrote any reloacatable stuff or made any disk demo that could be read except by the any OS. No one was having my code!

    Still, I did know how to make use the pretty basic system programming librarys(2 Huge telephone books of them) and they were all in ROM! I can only imagine what it's going to be like on PC.... these librarys are not in ROM, right? and I guess don't guess that current and complete versions are being given away to anyone?

    My first project PC seemed pretty basic and in MC68000 would be basic, if I do it the 'engine' may be written in assembler as it will need to be fast. I wanted to write an application that upscales standard DVD disks, so I need to learn about .bup files, maybe how to turn them into standard bitmaps and work the assembler magic on the un up-scaled bitmap, of course it would be nice if it worked on AVI's, MP4's and so on, just a question I guess of converting them all into a humble bitmap(wow will be dealing with a few more planes than I was used to on a 256 colour machine.... or 4096 but please no HAM!)... Maybe I should start on something simpler!

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    well, for visual studio, you can download the express (free) edition from here. it comes with everything you'll need to get started, including all the system libraries for windows. if you're looking for something open-source instead of proprietary, you can go with MinGW, which is a port of the GCC compiler collection to windows, and Code Blocks or NetBeans for an IDE. I use NetBeans at work, and while it's not perfect, it's (in my opinion) the best ide out there that isn't proprietary.

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    C++まいる!Cをこわせ! Elysia's Avatar
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    I second Visual Studio because it's all you need in one package and is visually pleasing and nice to work with. Even has a debugger.
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.

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