Compiling Error in Visual Studio 2005

This is a discussion on Compiling Error in Visual Studio 2005 within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; Hi all, I'm a newbie to using VS 2005 and recently I'm trying to compile some codes but I'm encountering ...

  1. #1
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    Compiling Error in Visual Studio 2005

    Hi all,

    I'm a newbie to using VS 2005 and recently I'm trying to compile some codes but I'm encountering some difficulties. Will appreciate it if you guys could help me out here. Thanks in advance.

    Basically the error I'm encountering is as below,

    error C2664: 'PhyCalcEtieln' : cannot convert parameter 4 from 'double [14][3]' to 'double *'

    For the rest of the codes, it's inside the attached file.

    Thanks again!
    Attached Files Attached Files

  2. #2
    the hat of redundancy hat nvoigt's Avatar
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    You are passing a double** where only a double* is expected. You need to change either the function or the parameter to something that matches.
    hth
    -nv

    She was so Blonde, she spent 20 minutes looking at the orange juice can because it said "Concentrate."

    When in doubt, read the FAQ.
    Then ask a smart question.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by nvoigt View Post
    You are passing a double** where only a double* is expected. You need to change either the function or the parameter to something that matches.
    Which is one reason why I never use multi-dimensional arrays in C or C++. I always use flat arrays and indexing functions or macros to get the same effect. The other reason has to do with the formats commonly used in numeric software such as BLAS or FFT libraries. Flat arrays are the norm.


    My recommendation is to change your array format to be a flat array of the type,
    Code:
    double x1e[ND * 3]={
    		0.0500,  0.0,     0.950  ,0.04293, 0.04503, 0.91204,
    		0.06206, 0.08990, 0.84803,0.07537, 0.12649, 0.79814,
                0.09640, 0.17191, 0.73169,0.12475, 0.20078, 0.67447,
    		0.17126, 0.25278, 0.57596,0.20346, 0.27928, 0.51726,
    		0.25974, 0.32027, 0.41999,0.33525, 0.35067, 0.31408,
    		0.40969, 0.35607, 0.23424,0.48556, 0.34552, 0.16893,
    		0.54515, 0.32321, 0.13163,0.61497, 0.29044, 0.09459  };
    Then create an indexing macro of the sort,
    Code:
    #define ixptr(val, i, j)  ((val)+(j) + (i)*3)
    Code is not checked for correctness.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by nvoigt View Post
    You are passing a double** where only a double* is expected. You need to change either the function or the parameter to something that matches.
    Actually, a 2D array is not a double ** either.

    --
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  5. #5
    C++まいる!Cをこわせ! Elysia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SevenThunders View Post
    Which is one reason why I never use multi-dimensional arrays in C or C++. I always use flat arrays and indexing functions or macros to get the same effect. The other reason has to do with the formats commonly used in numeric software such as BLAS or FFT libraries. Flat arrays are the norm.


    My recommendation is to change your array format to be a flat array of the type,
    Code:
    double x1e[ND * 3]={
    		0.0500,  0.0,     0.950  ,0.04293, 0.04503, 0.91204,
    		0.06206, 0.08990, 0.84803,0.07537, 0.12649, 0.79814,
                0.09640, 0.17191, 0.73169,0.12475, 0.20078, 0.67447,
    		0.17126, 0.25278, 0.57596,0.20346, 0.27928, 0.51726,
    		0.25974, 0.32027, 0.41999,0.33525, 0.35067, 0.31408,
    		0.40969, 0.35607, 0.23424,0.48556, 0.34552, 0.16893,
    		0.54515, 0.32321, 0.13163,0.61497, 0.29044, 0.09459  };
    Then create an indexing macro of the sort,
    Code:
    #define ixptr(val, i, j)  ((val)+(j) + (i)*3)
    Code is not checked for correctness.
    I would rather use true 2D arrays instead of macro trickery.
    They are not as difficult as you let them out to be.
    But without any context, I cannot say where or how you are going wrong. Same goes for OP.
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.

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