most efficient way to write filestream objects?

This is a discussion on most efficient way to write filestream objects? within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; I have a program where I have to create many different file stream objects to create and write to files. ...

  1. #1
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    most efficient way to write filestream objects?

    I have a program where I have to create many different file stream objects to create and write to files. Is it more efficient/faster to create these objects in functions, where they will be created and closed when the functions are called? Or would it be better to find a way to create the file stream objects once and find a way to have functions call them?

    Or make a class to handle creating/closing file stream objects?

    Has anyone used managed C++ (.net)? What would be the most efficient way to create/close many file stream and stream writer objects?

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    I have no idea about managed C++, so if that CHANGES what I say, then so be it. Someone with actual managed C++ experience may be able to tell.

    Generally, opening and closing a file is the SAFEST method, but not the most efficient, as opening and closing files is generally fairly slow - having one filestream that is passed from one function to the next is a much better option - just open the file in one place, and then use it in many functions, and close it when you know it's finished with.

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  3. #3
    Kiss the monkey. CodeMonkey's Avatar
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    You could use <fstream>. All of the classes are there already.
    Is this an assignment where the idea is to manage your own file pointer or something?

    Anyway, along the <fstream> lines, you can use one stream to open many different files -- just one at a time. Or, you can have many fstream objects and maintain a container of pointers to them (like std::vector<std::fstream*>).

    *edit* it seems I misunderstood the question
    "If you tell the truth, you don't have to remember anything"
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    Thanks. So I'll try to open file streams maybe when the program is initialized, and then call them when needed (I have to figure out how to do this). Or make a class to take care of things, if I have the time. Sigh. So many things to do, so little time.

    Managed C++ steals a lot of stuff from C++, so it should work basically the same way. I hope.

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