kestion about boost

This is a discussion on kestion about boost within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; The standardization is an open process. You're welcome to go here and read every bit that is published, including standard ...

  1. #16
    Cat without Hat CornedBee's Avatar
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    The standardization is an open process. You're welcome to go here and read every bit that is published, including standard drafts (n27something is the most recent), status reports, meeting minutes, and of course the individual proposals.
    All the buzzt!
    CornedBee

    "There is not now, nor has there ever been, nor will there ever be, any programming language in which it is the least bit difficult to write bad code."
    - Flon's Law

  2. #17
    Captain Crash brewbuck's Avatar
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    So long as Boost remains open and compatible with all major, modern compilers, I don't see it as any less a "standard" than the C++ library itself. I'd have no qualms using it on any major project where the target platforms are supportable by Boost.
    Code:
    //try
    //{
    	if (a) do { f( b); } while(1);
    	else   do { f(!b); } while(1);
    //}

  3. #18
    Cat without Hat CornedBee's Avatar
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    Unfortunately, not everyone - especially not companies - see it that way. There's something to be said for libraries that come with the compiler and just work out of the box.

    Also, there's a certain variation in the quality of the Boost libraries. Some even stop being maintained.
    All the buzzt!
    CornedBee

    "There is not now, nor has there ever been, nor will there ever be, any programming language in which it is the least bit difficult to write bad code."
    - Flon's Law

  4. #19
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    One of the biggest problems with committees is that they infringe upon the freedom of the end user to decide what stays and what goes. Its rather elitist, do you not concur?

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by c++0x View Post
    One of the biggest problems with committees is that they infringe upon the freedom of the end user to decide what stays and what goes. Its rather elitist, do you not concur?
    well, if you don't want to use it, don't #include it.

  6. #21
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    Which is why stuff from Boost should stay in boost and stuff from the STL should stay in the STL. Then you have the right to choose whether or not to use it instead of it being thrust upon you.

  7. #22
    Cat without Hat CornedBee's Avatar
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    Nonsense. Nothing in the standard library is forced on you.

    And this:
    One of the biggest problems with committees is that they infringe upon the freedom of the end user to decide what stays and what goes. Its rather elitist, do you not concur?
    is just aimless ranting without any reasoning behind it. The end use never has this freedom in the first place. That's what makes him the end user instead of the developer.
    All the buzzt!
    CornedBee

    "There is not now, nor has there ever been, nor will there ever be, any programming language in which it is the least bit difficult to write bad code."
    - Flon's Law

  8. #23
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    The end user of compilers is the developer, correct? But I suppose you are right. That is what makes us the end users and not the developers.

  9. #24
    The larch
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    At the same time you mention that you don't know what the smart pointer is. Don't you know that the elitist committee has already forced a std::auto_ptr on you
    I might be wrong.

    Thank you, anon. You sure know how to recognize different types of trees from quite a long way away.
    Quoted more than 1000 times (I hope).

  10. #25
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    They always force things I do not understand on me. Lyk look at std::iterator. What is that for anyway? And all of the algorithm header is greek to me.

  11. #26
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    I hope Greek is that easy...

    An iterator is just like a pointer wrapped in a pretty interface.

  12. #27
    The larch
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    Well, in a way. I guess as a C++ programmer you are supposed to be familiar with the standard library. The larger it gets the more things you are supposed to know. (It's the same with all other languages where the standard library is often a lot larger.)

    However, I guess many see the library as a tool, not a burden, and welcome useful additions.
    I might be wrong.

    Thank you, anon. You sure know how to recognize different types of trees from quite a long way away.
    Quoted more than 1000 times (I hope).

  13. #28
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    U r so rite anon you are so much more helpful than anyone else who posts here! Thank you so much.

  14. #29
    Registered User C_ntua's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyberfish View Post
    I hope Greek is that easy...

    An iterator is just like a pointer wrapped in a pretty interface.
    Rather ugly but functional interface. With the auto keyword (or using typedef) it becomes pretty as well

  15. #30
    Kiss the monkey. CodeMonkey's Avatar
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    Boost is on the cutting edge of C++, and aims to introduce libraries that facilitate often implementation-defined operations in a portable way. Of course, that's just one thing it's for, but that's what I like most about boost. Filesystem, thread, asio, etc allow me to write (albeit someways limited) portable code that does useful stuff. Sorry, had to throw in my two cents.
    "If you tell the truth, you don't have to remember anything"
    -Mark Twain

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