hi i new in this

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  1. #1
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    hi i new in this

    I'm new I want to learn how to program, and I want to learn programming for cell phones

    someone knows how this is transformed to 39F19032541F0DD0 this 73002000xxxxxx

  2. #2
    Banned master5001's Avatar
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    Yep. Its called hexidecimal. It is a base 16 number. Since I have written programs that do what you do, I should point out what you are wanting to do is probably illegal and your service provider reserves the right to suspend your account. (I know... harsh for something that I said I have done before--but I did it in the name of science not theft)

  3. #3
    Dae
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    Not illegal, but probably against their terms. Lame, I know. Not all though, give him a chance to say the brand and goal.
    Warning: Have doubt in anything I post.

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  4. #4
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    As I work in a related area, can I give you some advice:
    1. You need to learn how to program, very thoroughly, before you approach embedded programming, as things can go wrong much more in an embedded system [1] than in a PC.
    2. I have a fair understanding of mobile phones and how they work, but I have absolutely no idea what "39F19032541F0DD0 this 73002000xxxxxx " represents. Are you referring to the phone ID (such as IMEI) to telephone number - then it's kind of complex and depends a bit on what the system is [e.g. GSM, CDMA, WCDMA or whatever], (I don't know of any country where mobile phone numbers look like that, but that's not to sa that they don't look like that in some corner of the world - I only know what phone numbers look like in roughly half a dozen countries).

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  5. #5
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    But the hex sequence (no I didn't check this first) translates to 4175276875383246288, which looks nothing like the number given above...

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    Mats
    Compilers can produce warnings - make the compiler programmers happy: Use them!
    Please don't PM me for help - and no, I don't do help over instant messengers.

  6. #6
    Banned master5001's Avatar
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    I would imagine the hex value is probably not the hex value of the IMEI. Or perhaps the other is not the decimal value of the IMEI. It could be one of the proprietary ID numbers certain providers embed into their systems for alternate purposes--i.e. Push-to-talk as done in the Nextel methodology.

    Matsp, you upped your interesting points by like 5. I only mess with phone programming as a hobby. I may eventually post a question directly to you on one of the hidden boards sometime.

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