how is it possible to write/read in language other than english in a console app?

This is a discussion on how is it possible to write/read in language other than english in a console app? within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; Originally Posted by tabstop This is a library issue, not a gcc issue. wcout doesn't exist on my MinGW port, ...

  1. #16
    بابلی ریکا Masterx's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tabstop View Post
    This is a library issue, not a gcc issue. wcout doesn't exist on my MinGW port, but does on my Mac.
    so what should i do? !!
    ----
    and by the way , i appreciate your help on finding a way in determining the Platform in compilation time! any comments ?

  2. #17
    بابلی ریکا Masterx's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jwenting View Post
    never had a problem in producing Dutch console output, wide characters required.
    Same is true for Italian, French, Spanish, German, etc. etc. if you're willing to put up with loosing a few special characters (which has long been accepted way back in the days of typewriters).
    sorry i dind get you !would you explain it abit more again !

    tanx
    Last edited by Masterx; 10-29-2008 at 03:52 AM.

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    I think jwenting's coment refers to the fact that most european languages can be used with A-Za-z and a few others that are available in the ANSI character set (same as ISO-8859-1, I think?). However, I doubt that Arabic, Hebrew, Hindu, Urdu, Thai, Chinese, Japanese, Greek, and several other languages do not even use A-Z as representations of their native language, and in this case you NEED a wide character set. As to what you do to achieve that, my guess would be that if you want to make your life easy, you skip console applications, as support for multilingual console apps is very limited.

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    Please don't PM me for help - and no, I don't do help over instant messengers.

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by matsp View Post
    I think jwenting's coment refers to the fact that most european languages can be used with A-Za-z and a few others that are available in the ANSI character set (same as ISO-8859-1, I think?). However, I doubt that Arabic, Hebrew, Hindu, Urdu, Thai, Chinese, Japanese, Greek, and several other languages do not even use A-Z as representations of their native language, and in this case you NEED a wide character set. As to what you do to achieve that, my guess would be that if you want to make your life easy, you skip console applications, as support for multilingual console apps is very limited.


    --
    Mats
    tanx a milion dear Mats, as you ve just mentioned ,the asian langs are different and they dont use A,z etc stuff,i go along with it specialy on console application ,


    but the catch here is , i chose C++ because its chalenging! , and i chose console since it is again more chalenging!and it wants you to understand and make what you want in a hard wayconsidered to other programmming langs(full of experience and excitment for newbies like me).

    i want the job done! and im not gonna leave it alone before i test the current sulotions!and see the outcome.

    to tell you the truth, im working on the GUI version too, using wxwidgets, but first ive got to accomplish this task and then go for the other one.

    again many tanx .

  5. #20
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    It seems like the MS libraries do have a wcout, however, gcc-mingw uses a fairly old version of the MS C runtime, so it doesn't have that.

    Not sure what options you have here - using MS Visual Studio 2008 may be one choice.

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    Please don't PM me for help - and no, I don't do help over instant messengers.

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by matsp View Post
    It seems like the MS libraries do have a wcout, however, gcc-mingw uses a fairly old version of the MS C runtime, so it doesn't have that.

    Not sure what options you have here - using MS Visual Studio 2008 may be one choice.

    --
    Mats
    and thus , only one sulotion remains(to me!)!and that is doing it in a windows way! using a windows Api!
    there is an issue here! so to achive this, using a windows API in a expected cross platform application; i need a function which makes it clear that the code is being compiled under windows and thus would run in windows Os , then after that ,it will execute bunch of codes that does the job here! (manipulating unicode strings )and
    if not the function will skip that part and accroding to the platform( here usullay *nix platforms)in its compilition time,it would normaly act. and compiles!

    as far as i know ,unicode is farily implemented such platforms (rather than windows).and i will not face any problems in linux or Mac Os .

    how to write that function to determing whether is windows or not! in complition time!
    using size of() will do the trick?(ive heard wchar_t is 2 byte in windows and 4 bytes on *nix platforms! is it true ?)

    tanx

  7. #22
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    wcout is not a windows API. My point about using the Visual studio is that it HAS wcout, which is a standard function.

    As to OTHER poratibility problems, yes, they may well exist now and in the future.

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  8. #23
    C++まいる!Cをこわせ! Elysia's Avatar
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    The new C++ standard is supposed to fix all those multi-language problems... but it is still far away.
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.

  9. #24
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    so first ive gotta give it a try with VS 2008 compiler ( i think!?) and then continue on! solving the *nix specific problems !
    tanx .

  10. #25
    Registered User Codeplug's Avatar
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    I use STLport with MinGW - which does have wide iostreams.
    http://www.stlport.org/

    It's been explained already that wide streams do not support Unicode. Trying to do so in a cross-platform manner is even further complicated in that wchar_t and literal wide-string encodings are implementation defined.

    Having said all that - you can prevent the implicit wchar_t to char conversion in wide streams by using your own codecvt facet. This works ok for wide fstreams under most implementations, but still doesn't handle screen output for any windows compiler I have access to. However, starting with the VC++ 2008 CRT, you can use a new MS extension to enable Unicode (UTF16LE) output with wcout. Here's some code to play with:
    Code:
    #include <iostream>
    #include <iomanip>
    #include <fstream>
    #include <locale>
    #include <string>
    
    //------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    // null_wcodecvt is a codecvt facet that prevents the implicit conversion of 
    // whcar_t to char in wide streams
    
    typedef std::codecvt<wchar_t , char , mbstate_t> null_wcodecvt_base;
    
    class null_wcodecvt : public null_wcodecvt_base
    {
    public:
        explicit null_wcodecvt(size_t refs = 0) : null_wcodecvt_base(refs) {}
    
    protected:
        virtual result do_out(mbstate_t&,
                              const wchar_t* from,
                              const wchar_t* from_end,
                              const wchar_t*& from_next,
                              char* to,
                              char* to_end,
                              char*& to_next) const
        {
            size_t len = (from_end - from) * sizeof(wchar_t);
            memcpy(to, from, len);
            from_next = from_end;
            to_next = to + len;
            return ok;
        }//do_out
    
        virtual result do_in(mbstate_t&,
                             const char* from,
                             const char* from_end,
                             const char*& from_next,
                             wchar_t* to,
                             wchar_t* to_end,
                             wchar_t*& to_next) const
        {
            size_t len = (from_end - from);
            memcpy(to, from, len);
            from_next = from_end;
            to_next = to + (len / sizeof(wchar_t));
            return ok;
        }//do_in
    
        virtual result do_unshift(mbstate_t&, char* to, char*,
                                  char*& to_next) const
        {
            to_next = to;
            return noconv;
        }//do_unshift
    
        virtual int do_length(mbstate_t&, const char* from,
                              const char* end, size_t max) const
        {
            return (int)((max < (size_t)(end - from)) ? max : (end - from));
        }//do_length
    
        virtual bool do_always_noconv() const throw()
        {
            return true;
        }//do_always_noconv
    
        virtual int do_encoding() const throw()
        {
            return sizeof(wchar_t);
        }//do_encoding
    
        virtual int do_max_length() const throw()
        {
            return sizeof(wchar_t);
        }//do_max_length
    };//null_wcodecvt
    
    //------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    
    std::wostream& wendl(std::wostream& out)
    {
        // this is needed for files opened in binary mode under Windows in order
        // to retain Windows-style newline
    #if defined(_WIN32)
        out.put(L'\r');
    #endif
        out.put(L'\n');
        out.flush();
        return out;
    }//wendl
    
    //------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    
    const wchar_t UTF_BOM = 0xfeff;
    
    const wchar_t CHECK_SYM = L'\u221a';
    
    //------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    
    void file_test()
    {
        // create UTF16LE text file for windows, UTF32[BE|LE] for *nix
        std::wfstream file;
    
        null_wcodecvt wcodec(1);
        std::locale wloc(std::locale::classic(), &wcodec);
        file.imbue(wloc);
    
        file.open("data.txt", std::ios::out | std::ios::binary);
        if (!file)
        {
            std::cerr << "Failed to open data.txt for writting" << std::endl;
            return;
        }//if
    
        file << UTF_BOM << L"data = " << 42 << CHECK_SYM << wendl;
        file.close();
    }//file_test
    
    //------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    
    #if defined(_MSC_VER) && (_MSC_VER >= 1500)
    #   define HAVE_O_U16TEXT
    #   include <fcntl.h>
    #   include <io.h>
    #endif
    
    void wcout_test()
    {
    #if defined(HAVE_O_U16TEXT)
        // newest MS CRT supports UTF16 output using special mode
        int mode = _setmode(_fileno(stdout), _O_U16TEXT);
    #else
        // for everything else, use our codecvt facet - I haven't seen this work
        // for any windows compiler...may work for *nix but untested
        null_wcodecvt wcodec(1);
        std::locale wloc(std::locale::classic(), &wcodec);
        std::wcout.imbue(wloc);
    #endif
    
        std::wcout << L"U+221a - [" << wchar_t(0x221a) << L"]" << std::endl;
    
    #if defined(HAVE_O_U16TEXT)
        // revert to original mode
        _setmode(_fileno(stdout), mode);
    #endif
    
        std::cout << "Testing 1, 2, 3" << std::endl;
    }//wcout_test
    
    //------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    
    int main()
    {
        file_test();
        wcout_test();
        return 0;
    }//main
    I would interested in knowing if this works for anyone running *nix and a Unicode-enabled terminal.

    There's still the underlying problem that the wchar_t encoding is implementation defined - which means that using wchar_t as a cross-platform Unicode character is useless.

    "Forcing" wchar_t to do something useful with Unicode is really a platform and implementation dependent exercise.

    gg

  11. #26
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    many many tanx dear Codeplug, i will test it and i will tell what happens
    again tanx alot .
    i really appreciate your helps , all of you .
    tanx

  12. #27
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    At the risk of being assaulted by some of the others here, why not just use C standard functions instead of iostreams?

  13. #28
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    Because they're really no better in this department.
    All the buzzt!
    CornedBee

    "There is not now, nor has there ever been, nor will there ever be, any programming language in which it is the least bit difficult to write bad code."
    - Flon's Law

  14. #29
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    I have some insite that is only going to apply to OS specific situations. I googled and found a few libraries floating around that are more apt for doing localization.

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