print hex value of character

This is a discussion on print hex value of character within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; Hi everyone, Sorry for the noobish question, but I just started learning C++ (I learned C before) and got stuck ...

  1. #1
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    print hex value of character

    Hi everyone,
    Sorry for the noobish question, but I just started learning C++ (I learned C before) and got stuck on a really simple exercise:
    Write a program that prints out the letters a ..z and the digits 0 ..9 and their
    integer values. Do the same for other printable characters. Do the same again but use hexadecimal notation.

    Here's what I got so far:
    Code:
    int main()
    {
    	cout << "a\t" << int('a') << endl
    		<< "b\t" << int('b') << endl
    		<< "c\t" << int('c') << endl
    		<< "d\t" << int('d') << endl
    		<< "e\t" << int('e') << endl
    		<< "f\t" << int('f') << endl
    		<< "g\t" << int('g') << endl
    		<< "h\t" << int('h') << endl
    		<< "i\t" << int('i') << endl
    		<< "j\t" << int('j') << endl
    		<< "k\t" << int('k') << endl
    		<< "l\t" << int('l') << endl
    		<< "m\t" << int('m') << endl
    		<< "n\t" << int('n') << endl
    		<< "o\t" << int('o') << endl
    		<< "p\t" << int('p') << endl
    		<< "q\t" << int('q') << endl
    		<< "r\t" << int('r') << endl
    		<< "s\t" << int('s') << endl
    		<< "t\t" << int('t') << endl
    		<< "u\t" << int('u') << endl
    		<< "v\t" << int('v') << endl
    		<< "w\t" << int('w') << endl
    		<< "x\t" << int('x') << endl
    		<< "y\t" << int('y') << endl
    		<< "z\t" << int('z') << endl
    		<< "0\t" << int('0') << endl
    		<< "1\t" << int('1') << endl
    		<< "2\t" << int('2') << endl
    		<< "3\t" << int('3') << endl
    		<< "4\t" << int('4') << endl
    		<< "5\t" << int('5') << endl
    		<< "6\t" << int('6') << endl
    		<< "7\t" << int('7') << endl
    		<< "8\t" << int('8') << endl
    		<< "9\t" << int('9') << endl
    		<< "{\t" << int('{') << endl
    		<< ".\t" << int('.') << endl
    		<< "+\t" << int('+') << endl;
    
    	return 0;
    }
    I know I could easily use a few loops and make it much shorter, but since the book didn't cover loops yet I just kept it expanded.
    Now my problem is, I don't know how to output the character's hexadecimal value. Could someone point me out to the right direction? I searched google but I didn't find anything simple,
    I might not be a pro, but I'm usually right

  2. #2
    C++ Witch laserlight's Avatar
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    Read this page on format flags and you will find something useful.
    C + C++ Compiler: MinGW port of GCC
    Version Control System: Bazaar

    Look up a C++ Reference and learn How To Ask Questions The Smart Way

  3. #3
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    Thanks laserlight. Got it
    I might not be a pro, but I'm usually right

  4. #4
    Kernel hacker
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    And of course, you could quite easily do this with loops instead of listing all the characters on a line each. That would take the program from about 40 lines to about 10.

    --
    Mats
    Compilers can produce warnings - make the compiler programmers happy: Use them!
    Please don't PM me for help - and no, I don't do help over instant messengers.

  5. #5
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    Yes I know that. But I'm currently learning the language from "The C++ Programming Language", and I haven't reached loops yet (although I know already how to use them). In addition to that, the author of the book recommends you don't assume which character set your system uses.
    It is not safe to
    assume that there are no more than 127 characters in an 8bit
    character set (e.g., some sets provide
    255 characters), that there are no more alphabetic characters than English provides (most European languages provide more), that the alphabetic characters are contiguous (EBCDIC leaves a gap between &#180;i&#180; and &#180;j&#180...
    That's why I preferred to just keep it expanded with no loops
    I might not be a pro, but I'm usually right

  6. #6
    Kernel hacker
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    Good point. If you want a solution that works with loops, but doesn't rely on the character set used being in any particular order, then you could do this:
    Code:
    int main()
    {
       int i;
       char chars[] = "abcdefghijklmnoprstuvwxyz1234567890{+-.";
    
       for(i = 0; i < sizeof(chars)-1; i++)
       {
           std::cout << chars[i] << "\t" << static_cast<int>(chars[i]) << std::endl;
       }
       return 0;
    }
    --
    Mats
    Compilers can produce warnings - make the compiler programmers happy: Use them!
    Please don't PM me for help - and no, I don't do help over instant messengers.

  7. #7
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    Interesting.. You always amaze me! I never thought of anything like that.
    I might not be a pro, but I'm usually right

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