Commercial applications?

This is a discussion on Commercial applications? within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; If I use MSVC++ 2005 Express, could I develop commercial applications? Btw, anybody know free/open-source C++ compilers that allow us ...

  1. #1
    Ugly C Lover audinue's Avatar
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    Commercial applications?

    If I use MSVC++ 2005 Express, could I develop commercial applications?

    Btw, anybody know free/open-source C++ compilers that allow us to develop commercial applications without any fee?

    As far I know there is:
    - GNU C++
    - Digital Mars C++ Compiler
    - Old Borland C++ Compiler

    Anything else?

  2. #2
    Cat without Hat CornedBee's Avatar
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    Yes, you can, so add VC++ Express to that list.
    All the buzzt!
    CornedBee

    "There is not now, nor has there ever been, nor will there ever be, any programming language in which it is the least bit difficult to write bad code."
    - Flon's Law

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    C++Pandit
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    Bloodshed Dev C++

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    Kernel hacker
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saimadhav View Post
    Bloodshed Dev C++
    Technically, Dev C++ is not a compiler. It uses gcc/g++ (Gnu C++), which is already in that list. So does Code::Blocks and probably one or two others.

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    Mats
    Compilers can produce warnings - make the compiler programmers happy: Use them!
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    Captain Crash brewbuck's Avatar
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    VS Express is okay for commercial use. It just lacks some features you might eventually want in your development environment. As far as I know the only Visual Studio with any sort of restrictions on commercial usage is the "Student Edition" which is sometimes handed out at seminars.

    I'd highly recommend actually paying for a complete copy if and when you can afford it. I understand not having a lot of money in the beginning, though.

    The other free options might work as far as compiling code, but commercial programs have needs beyond just compiling to a .EXE file. For one thing, you probably will need an installer.
    Code:
    //try
    //{
    	if (a) do { f( b); } while(1);
    	else   do { f(!b); } while(1);
    //}

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    fwiw borland put out a new IDE studio last year.

    it has a really nice feature that lets you collapse blocks of code between curly braces; so you ran read your implementation files more like header files.

    dunno if any of the others have that, but i thought that was a great feature.

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    Quote Originally Posted by m37h0d View Post
    fwiw borland put out a new IDE studio last year.

    it has a really nice feature that lets you collapse blocks of code between curly braces; so you ran read your implementation files more like header files.

    dunno if any of the others have that, but i thought that was a great feature.
    I'm pretty sure MS Visual Studio has it. I used an editor (forgot the name) at Ericsson some 12-15 years ago that did exactly that. I think Eclipse can do it too. I don't personally like that feature, but that's a different matter.

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    Mats
    Compilers can produce warnings - make the compiler programmers happy: Use them!
    Please don't PM me for help - and no, I don't do help over instant messengers.

  8. #8
    C++まいる!Cをこわせ!
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    VS does indeed have it, but VS has a very bad habit of expanding those collapsed blocks when you modify code that is in the proximity of the collpased block (just below).
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.

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    Registered User guesst's Avatar
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    Why hasn't anyone mentioned MinGW yet?
    Type-ins are back! Visit Cymon's Games at http://www.cymonsgames.com for a new game every week!

  10. #10
    Cat without Hat CornedBee's Avatar
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    Because that's what GNU C++ is.
    All the buzzt!
    CornedBee

    "There is not now, nor has there ever been, nor will there ever be, any programming language in which it is the least bit difficult to write bad code."
    - Flon's Law

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    Registered User guesst's Avatar
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    Dang it, first post. My bad-olio.
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