A begginer's question

This is a discussion on A begginer's question within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; Hello, I started learning C++ about 2 weeks ago, I'm already in classes, but from strings to that part I ...

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    A begginer's question

    Hello, I started learning C++ about 2 weeks ago, I'm already in classes, but from strings to that part I feel like I don't understand it, I've already read strings twice, and still haven't mastered them?, how did you get to master c++ I mean how much did it take you and using what methods did you achieve that status in c++?

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    So, do you have any question about strings, or do you want to hear our experiences in learning C++?
    All the buzzt!
    CornedBee

    "There is not now, nor has there ever been, nor will there ever be, any programming language in which it is the least bit difficult to write bad code."
    - Flon's Law

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    experiences, and if you think that my case is a common one or a weird one

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    It sounds common to me. Two weeks is not very long at all. I'm surprised you're already on classes.

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    Programming is difficult, and C++ is a complex programming language. For example, there are no reference books that cover the entire C++ Standard Library! (There are a couple of complete online references, and of course the ANSI/ISO language standard itself is complete.) And as you may already know, the standard part of the language doesn't include graphics, color, sound, networking, etc. All of this is done with additional libraries.

    Quoting myself:
    Quote Originally Posted by DougDbug
    It's like learning to play the guitar, you can learn a few chords in a few days or a few weeks, but it's going to be about a year before you can impress your friends.
    Are you studying a programming book, or are you using online tutorials? If you don't have a book, I strongly recommend that you get one. A 300-700 page beginning C++ book will cover essentially the same information as the cprogramming.com tutorials, but with a lot more detail and explanation.

    The best way to learn is to take a class, especially if C++ is your first programming language. Most professional programmers have taken Computer Science in college. Many of the experts here have taken college-level computer programming. I would guess that it takes two college-semesters to cover the entire language standard.

    I've been programming off & on for many years. I've taken a few progamming classes (never a C++ class) and I'm still not an expert.

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    I'm 17, and next year I'm starting computer science,I'm learning c++ thorugh this page, cprogramming.com

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    It takes quite a while to learn C++, even the standards/basics. Doug is right about the guitar metaphor. I have been learning for about 2 years off and on, and I am finally to the point where I can make something that someone else can make use of (even if it's small). College computer science classes can be hard. Mainly because the subject of C++ is so broad, and the classes are so short in comparison. A book may or may not help you. If you have access to the internet almost all the time you might find yourself just googling or going to msdn for answers. A book is always a good reference to have, though.

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    If you're new to programming, I'd start with something like Python.

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    OK, I'll talk here because I'm 17 too and I started programming just a year ago with C. I bought myself "C All-in-one Desk Reference for Dummies", and took absolutely no classes. After finishing it, I bought "The C Programming Language" by K&R, because the for dummies book doesn't touch things like preprocessor directives, function pointers or other random stuff.

    The guitar metaphor is extremely true. I practiced a lot this last year, and I still feel like a n00b in these forums. I've written some random programs in C (which 2 of them have actually been useful), but I have to say I am a LOT better than when I was in my 2nd week and I could maybe "impress some friends" . Now, I'm learning C++ which in my opinion is a lot cooler, but it has a LOT of new stuff. I also know some python, but I'm gonna focus on C++ first.

    Just one small warning... to learn C I used up a lot of time. It is extremely time consuming to learn a programming language like this, and sometimes you may be weeks in the computer doing nothing but practicing and researching how to do particular things. Just remember to take usual breaks because it hurts and you don't want to get addicted . Is it worth it? I think yes. I haven't done anything that has payed me money, but I'm sure I could, because programming is essential, especially in languages like these.

    So overall, I just bought some books, allocated some time, researched, consumed a lot of google bandwith, downloaded many open source programs, and asked in these forums. I owe a lot of thanks to all the masters that are on these forums (they all know who they are). They are really big help. Just be considerate and don't make them give you classes or do your homework for you.

    If you dedicate 5 years to anything, you'll be the best at it. Just make sure you love it.

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    Hey, why do you recommend me pithon, is it easier?, do you think that I shouldn't start with c++ right off?, I mean, should I learn an easier language like python first?

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    Quote Originally Posted by santiman12 View Post
    Hey, why do you recommend me pithon, is it easier?, do you think that I shouldn't start with c++ right off?, I mean, should I learn an easier language like python first?
    It's mostly personal choice. I started learning C++ first without any prior programming knowledge. Depends on what you feel like doing/learning first.

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    And use a good book. See C++ Book Recommendations for some good ones.
    Thinking C++ from Bruce Eckel might be a good choice.

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    after finishin college, I wanna go to the guildhall and get a master in software development, what language would you recommend me to learn in order to enter Guildhall?

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    Quote Originally Posted by santiman12 View Post
    after finishin college, I wanna go to the guildhall and get a master in software development, what language would you recommend me to learn in order to enter Guildhall?
    I have no idea about Guildhall itself, but learning different languages is the easy part.

    The hard part is learning how to program, how to split a problem into manageable pieces, how to connect different functions/methods together, how to find bugs and how to fix them (without creating new ones, preferrably!). You may believe that those are the same things - but they are not. Learning to program is like learning to drive a car (but it is much, much harder for most people to learn to program, which is why a University degree in Software engineering takes a few years to complete, whilst most driving schools in England can teach most student to drive a car in a couple of weeks intensive course).

    Programming languages is like learning to drive a different model of car - as long as we stay away from large lorries/trucks, it's pretty much the same thing whichever one you go for - ok, the gearbox may be a bit different (automatic, manual, 4, 5 or 6 speeds, paddle-shift if you have a fancy sports car, etc, etc), and some are more powerful, bigger, smaller, etc, etc. But the overall method of how you go about driving is about the same.

    So in programming languages, some of the details are different - some are "automatic gearbox", that is, some of the work is done behind the scenes, you don't have to worry about it, just put it in D and off you go. Others give you more direct control, but this also makes it harder to work with, because there is more to keep your mind on. C and C++ falls in the latter category, whilst for example Basic or PHP are more on the "automatic" side of things.

    So for your Guildhall education, you would want to find out if there is any particular language that is a pre-requisite for the course (I expect not, if it's intended for students with no prior programming experience, which is what I'd expect for a course designed for 17-18 year old students). If there isn't a pre-requisite, then you are free to learn whatever you like. A good idea would be to try a language that is quite different. Lisp, Prolog, Forth are a few examples that come to mind.

    Python is a good beginners language for learning to program, because it is a bit on the "automatic" side, has object oriented concepts, enforces good layout/indentation (because the definition of what is in a block [loop body, if-statement, etc] is defined by the amount of indentation).

    --
    Mats
    Compilers can produce warnings - make the compiler programmers happy: Use them!
    Please don't PM me for help - and no, I don't do help over instant messengers.

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    Guildhall is a graduate degree, not an undergraduate.And, I think they require c++

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